Results for 'Synaesthesia'

296 found
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  1. Synesthesia as (Multimodal) Mental Imagery.Bence Nanay - 2021 - Multisensory Research 34:281-296.
    It has been repeatedly suggested that synesthesia is intricately connected with unusual ways of exercising one’s mental imagery, although it is not always entirely clear what the exact connection is. My aim is to show that all forms of synesthesia are forms of (often very different kinds of) mental imagery and, further, if we consider synesthesia to be a form of mental imagery, we get significant explanatory benefits, especially concerning less central cases of synesthesia where the inducer is not sensory (...)
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  2. Synaesthesia: A Window Into Perception, Thought and Language.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (12):3-34.
    (1) The induced colours led to perceptual grouping and pop-out, (2) a grapheme rendered invisible through ‘crowding’ or lateral masking induced synaesthetic colours — a form of blindsight — and (3) peripherally presented graphemes did not induce colours even when they were clearly visible. Taken collectively, these and other experiments prove conclusively that synaesthesia is a genuine percep- tual phenomenon, not an effect based on memory associations from childhood or on vague metaphorical speech. We identify different subtypes of number–colour (...)
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  3. Synesthesia Vs. Crossmodal Illusions.Casey O'Callaghan - 2017 - In Ophelia Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blendings: New Essays on Synaesthesia. Oxford, UK: pp. 45-58.
    We can discern two opposing viewpoints regarding synesthesia. According to the first, it is an oddity, an outlier, or a disordered condition. According to the second, synesthesia is pervasive, driving creativity, metaphor, or language itself. Which is it? Ultimately, I favor the first perspective, according to which cross-sensory synesthesia is an outlying condition. But the second perspective is not wholly misguided. My discussion has three lessons. First, synesthesia is just one of a variety of effects in which one sense modality (...)
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  4.  3
    Linguistic Synesthesia in Turkish: A Corpus-Based Study of Crossmodal Directionality.Alper Kumcu - 2021 - Metaphor and Symbol 36 (4):241-255.
    Linguistic synesthesia (or synesthetic/intrafield/crossmodal metaphor) refers to crossmodal instances in which expressions in different sensory modalities are combined as in the case of sweet (taste) melody (hearing). Ullmann was among the first to show that synesthetic transfers seem to follow a potentially universal hierarchy that goes from the so-called “lower” (i.e., touch, taste and smell) to “higher” senses (i.e., hearing and sight). Several studies across languages, cultures, domains and text types seem to support the hierarchy in linguistic synesthesia despite some (...)
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  5.  49
    Synesthesia, Sensory-Motor Contingency, and Semantic Emulation: How Swimming Style-Color Synesthesia Challenges the Traditional View of Synesthesia.Aleksandra Mroczko-Wąsowicz & Markus Werning - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology / Research Topic Linking Perception and Cognition in Frontiers in Cognition 3 (279):1-12.
    Synesthesia is a phenomenon in which an additional nonstandard perceptual experience occurs consistently in response to ordinary stimulation applied to the same or another modality. Recent studies suggest an important role of semantic representations in the induction of synesthesia. In the present proposal we try to link the empirically grounded theory of sensory-motor contingency and mirror system based embodied simulation to newly discovered cases of swimming-style color synesthesia. In the latter color experiences are evoked only by showing the synesthetes a (...)
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  6.  55
    Synaesthesia is Associated with Enhanced, Self-Rated Visual Imagery.Kylie J. Barnett & Fiona N. Newell - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):1032-1039.
    Although the condition known as synaesthesia is currently undergoing a scientific resurgence, to date the literature has largely focused on the heterogeneous nature of synaesthesia across individuals. In order to provide a better understanding of synaesthesia, however, general characteristics need to be investigated. Synaesthetic experiences are often described as occurring ‘internally’ or in the ‘mind’s eye’, which is remarkably similar to how we would describe our experience of visual mental imagery. We assessed the role of visual imagery (...)
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  7. Synaesthesia.Fiona Macpherson - 2007 - In Mario de Caro, Francesco Ferretti & Massimo Marraffa (eds.), Cartography of the Mind: Philosophy and Psychology in Intersection. Kleuwer.
    Synaesthesia is most often characterised as a union or mixing of the senses. i Richard Cytowic describes it thus: “It denotes the rare capacity to hear colours, taste shapes or experience other equally startling sensory blendings whose quality seems difficult for most of us to imagine” ([1995] 1997, 7). One famous example is of a man who “tasted shapes”. When he experienced flavours he also experienced shapes rubbing against his face or hands. ii Such popular characterisations are rough and (...)
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  8. Rethinking Synesthesia.Michael Sollberger - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (2):171 - 187.
    Synesthetes are people who report having perceptual experiences that are very unusual, such as ?seeing? sounds as colors or ?smelling? colors as odors. It is commonly assumed these days that such synesthetic experiences must be instances of misperceptions. Against this widespread assumption, I will highlight that there is reason to think that at least some synesthetic experiences can be viewed as truly veridical perceptions, and not as illusions or hallucinations. On this view, which I will back up by conceptual arguments (...)
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  9. Synaesthesia: The Prevalence of Atypical Cross-Modal Experiences.J. Simner, C. Mulvenna, N. Sagiv, E. Tsakanikos, S. A. Witherby, C. Fraser, K. Scott & J. Ward - 2006 - Perception 35 (8):1024-33.
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  10. Synesthesia, Hallucination, and Autism.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2021 - Frontiers in Bioscience 26:797-809.
    Synesthesia literally means a “union of the senses” whereby two or more of the five senses that are normally experienced separately are involuntarily and automatically joined together in experience. For example, some synesthetes experience a color when they hear a sound, although many instances of synesthesia also occur entirely within the visual sense. In this paper, I first mainly engage critically with Sollberger’s view that there is reason to think that at least some synesthetic experiences can be viewed as truly (...)
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  11. Synesthesia, Experiential Parts, and Conscious Unity.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2012 - Philosophy Study 2 (2):73-80.
    Synesthesia is the “union of the senses” whereby two or more of the five senses that are normally experienced separately are involuntarily and automatically joined together in experience. For example, some synesthetes experience a color when they hear a sound or see a letter. In this paper, I examine two cases of synesthesia in light of the notions of “experiential parts” and “conscious unity.” I first provide some background on the unity of consciousness and the question of experiential parts. I (...)
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  12. Synaesthesia in Phantom Limbs Induced with Mirrors.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Diane Rogers-Ramachandran - 1996 - Proceedings of the Royal Society of London 263:377-386.
  13. Synesthesia: Implications for Attention, Binding, and Consciousness--A Commentary.Anne Treisman - 2005 - In Lynn C. Robertson & Noam Sagiv (eds.), Synesthesia: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. pp. 239-254.
     
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  14.  4
    Synesthesia in Contemporary Music.María Luz Rivera Fernández - 2022 - Human Review. International Humanities Review / Revista Internacional de Humanidades 11 (2).
    In this work we present the complex relationship between sound and color in musical creation throughout history that continues to be fruitful in current musical composition. Synesthesia in music establishes a correspondence between sound and color and has been a constant debate since the 17th century. The complex nature of sound appears from ancient Greece in the school of Pythagoras in which the number becomes the configurator of harmony. Since then, different aesthetic attempts have arisen to relate color and sound (...)
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  15.  6
    Synesthesia in Children with Difficulties in Written Language Learning.Anahita Basirat & Jean-Michel Hupé - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 82:102951.
  16. Can Synaesthesia Be Cultivated?: Indications From Surveys of Meditators.Roger Walsh - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (4-5):5-17.
    Synaesthesia is considered a rare perceptual capacity, and one that is not capable of cultivation. However, meditators report the experience quite commonly, and in questionnaire surveys, respondents claimed to experience synaesthesia in 35% of meditation retreatants, in 63% of a group of regular meditators, and in 86% of advanced teachers. These rates were significantly higher than in nonmeditator controls, and displayed significant correlations with measures of amount of meditation experience. A review of ancient texts found reports suggestive of (...)
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  17. What Can Synesthesia Teach Us About Higher Order Theories of Consciousness?Fred Adams & Charlotte Shreve - 2016 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (3):251-257.
    In this article, we will describe higher order thought theories of consciousness. Then we will describe some examples from synesthesia. Finally, we will explain why the latter may be relevant to the former.
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  18. Synesthesia and Consciousness.Noam Sagiv & Chris D. Frith - 2013 - In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. pp. 924--940.
    In this chapter we examine the role of synaesthesia research within the broader context of the science of the mind and in particular the scientific study of consciousness. We argue that synaesthesia could be used as a model problem for the scientific study of consciousness, offering a novel perspective on perception, awareness and even social cognition. We highlight some of the lessons we have learnt from studying synaesthesia and areas in which we see synaesthesia research generating (...)
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  19.  52
    Synthetic Synaesthesia and Sensory Substitution.Michael J. Proulx - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):501-503.
    Visual information can be provided to blind users through sensory substitution devices that convert images into sound. Through extensive use to develop expertise, some blind users have reported visual experiences when using such a device. These blind expert users have also reported visual phenomenology to other sounds even when not using the device. The blind users acquired synthetic synaesthesia, with visual experience evoked by sounds only after gaining such expertise. Sensorimotor learning may facilitate and perhaps even be required to (...)
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  20.  1
    Synaesthesia and the Ancient Senses.Shane Butler & Alex C. Purves (eds.) - 2013 - Acumen Publishing.
    A path-breaking collection launching a new series of books on the senses in antiquity. Synaesthesia and the Ancient Senses presents a radical reappraisal of antiquity's textures, flavours, and aromas, sounds and sights. It offers both a fresh look at society in the ancient world and an opportunity to deepen the reading of classical literature. The book will appeal to readers in classical society and literature, philosophy and cultural history. All Greek and Latin is translated and technical matters are explained (...)
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  21. Synaesthesia and Kinaesthetics.Joerg Fingerhut, Sabine Flach & Jan Söffner - 2011 - Peter Lang.
    A myriad of sensations inform and direct us when we engage with the environment. To understand their influence on the development of our habitus it is important to focus on unifying processes in sensing. This approach allows us to include phenomena that elude a rather narrow view that focuses on each of the five discrete senses in isolation. One of the central questions addressed in this volume is whether there is something like a sensual habitus, and if there is, how (...)
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  22. Color Synesthesia.Berit Brogaard, Dimitria Gatzia & Jennifer J. Matey - 2019 - In Renzo Shamey (ed.), Encyclopedia of Color Science and Technology 2nd Edition. Springer. pp. 1-7.
    Encyclopedia entry on color synesthesia with cognitive/neurscientific focus.
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  23.  65
    Can Synaesthesia Research Inform Cognitive Science?Roi Cohen Kadosh & Avishai Henik - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):177-184.
  24. Color Synesthesia.Berit Brogaard - forthcoming - In Kimberly A. Jameson (ed.), Cognition & Language, Encyclopedia of Color Science and Technology. Springer.
  25. Does Synesthesia Undermine Representationalism?Torin Alter - 2006 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 12.
    Does synesthesia undermine representationalism? Gregg Rosenberg (2004) argues that it does. On his view, synesthesia illustrates how phenomenal properties can vary independently of representational properties. So, for example, he argues that sound/color synesthetic experiences show that visual experiences do not always represent spatial properties. I will argue that the representationalist can plausibly answer Rosenberg.
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  26.  20
    Synesthesia and Learning: A Critical Review and Novel Theory.Marcus R. Watson, Kathleen A. Akins, Chris Spiker, Lyle Crawford & James T. Enns - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  27.  23
    Synesthesia, Incongruence, and Emotionality.Alicia Callejas & Juan Lupiáñez - 2013 - In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. pp. 347.
    Synaesthesia has an emotional side. Many synaesthetes have a sense of certainty about the reality and accuracy of their experiences. Consequently, when their synaesthesia is mimicked in real life these synaeshtetes report a positive emotion whereas when the opposite is true, they experience discomfort. Synaesthesia can also be induced by emotions, and emotions can also be the synaesthetic experience. Here we review the research on these types of synaesthesia and study the current evidence for the true (...)
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  28.  38
    Synaesthesia in Chinese Characters: The Role of Radical Function and Position.Wan-Yu Hung, Julia Simner, Richard Shillcock & David M. Eagleman - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 24:38-48.
    Grapheme-colour synaesthetes experience unusual colour percepts when they encounter letters and/or digits. Studies of English-speaking grapheme-colour synaesthetes have shown that synaesthetic colours are sometimes triggered by rule-based linguistic mechanisms . In contrast, little is known about synaesthesia in logographic languages such as Chinese. The current study shows the mechanisms by which synaesthetic speakers of Chinese colour their language. One hypothesis is that Chinese characters might be coloured by their constituent morphological units, known as radicals, and we tested this by (...)
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  29. Synesthesia.Sean Allen-Hermanson & Jennifer Matey - 2012 - In J. Feiser & B. Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is an encyclopedia entry on Synesthesia. It provides a summary of our current knowledge about the condition and it reviews the philosophical implications that have been drawn from considerations about synesthesia. It's import for debates about consciousness, perception, modular theories of mind, creativity and aesthetics are discussed.
     
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  30.  40
    Synesthesia, Sensory-Motor Contingency, and Semantic Emulation: How Swimming Style-Color Synesthesia Challenges the Traditional View of Synesthesia.Aleksandra Mroczko-Wąsowicz & Markus Werning - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
  31. Synesthesia: A Window on the Hard Problem of Consciousness.Jeffrey A. Gray - 2005 - In Lynn C. Robertson & Noam Sagiv (eds.), Synesthesia: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. pp. 127-146.
  32.  53
    Synesthesia in Infants and Very Young Children.Daphne Maurer, Laura C. Gibson & Ferrinne Spector - 2013 - In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. pp. 46--63.
    This chapter provides a review of the hypothesis that synesthetic-like perception is present in infants and toddlers. Infants and very young children exhibit evidence of functional hyperconnectivity between the senses, much of which is reminiscent of the cross-sensory associations observed in synaesthetic adults. As most of these cross-sensory correspondances cannot be easily explained by learning, it is likely that these represent natural associations between the senses. In average adults, these 'natural associations' are felt only intuitively rather than explicitly. These observations (...)
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  33. What Synaesthesia Really Tells Us About Functionalism.Richard Gray - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (9):64-69.
    J. A. Gray et al. have recently argued that synaesthesia can be used as a counterexample to functionalism. They provide empirical evidence which they hold supports two anti-functionalist claims: disparate functions share the same types of qualia and the effects of synaesthetic qualia are, contrary to what one would expect from evolutionary considerations, adverse to those functions with which those types of qualia are normally linked. I argue that the empirical evidence they cite does not rule out functionalism, rather (...)
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  34. Synaesthesia, Metaphor and Consciousness: A Cognitive-Developmental Perspective.Harry T. Hunt - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (12):26-45.
    A cognitive-developmental theory of synaesthesias - those subjective states fusing separate perceptual modalities - is supported by research indicating their neocortical basis and first appearance as part of the semantic learning of words, letters, numbers, and time in the early grade school years. It contrasts with models of a primitive, anomalous holdover from an earlier neural hyperconnectivity, widely assumed in recent neuroscience approaches. Classical synaesthesias, occurring most vividly in high 'fantasy proneness' children, as well as the more normative and less (...)
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  35.  27
    Synesthesia and Binding.Bryan D. Alvarez & Lynn C. Robertson - 2013 - In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. pp. 317.
    Synaesthesia is an excellent model for understanding perceptual binding in the human brain. Current evidence suggests that if synaesthetic colour is bound, it is through the same attention-dependent integration of feature maps that occurs in other forms of binding. synaesthetic colour arises after the point that separate wavelengths blend in normal colour vision, which creates a perceptual paradox where synaesthetic and print colour can appear bound to a single location without blending. If a letter is printed in a colour (...)
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  36.  26
    Music-Colour Synaesthesia: Concept, Context and Qualia.Caroline Curwen - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 61:94-106.
    This review provides a commentary on coloured-hearing arising on hearing music: music-colour synaesthesia. Although traditionally explained by the hyperconnectivity theory (Ramachandran & Hubbard, 2001a) and the disinhibited feedback theory (Grossenbacher & Lovelace, 2001) as a purely perceptual phenomenon, the review of eight coloured-hearing neuroimaging studies shows that it may not be assumed that these explanations are directly translatable to music-colour synaesthesia. The concept of 'ideaesthesia' (Nikolić, 2009) and the role of conceptual and semantic inducers challenge the likelihood of (...)
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  37.  75
    Synaesthesia: Supernormal Integration?C. Mulvenna & V. Walsh - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (8):350-352.
  38.  22
    Numbers, Synesthesia, and Directionality.Roi Cohen Kadosh & Avishai Henik - 2013 - In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press.
    Numbers are fundamental to our understanding of, and survival in, the environment. Not surprisingly, numbers represent an important psychological dimension in triggering synaesthetic experiences, such as in digit-colour synaesthesia, or number-space synaesthesia. Another important consideration is directionality in synaesthesia, in that we might ask whether the stimulus and response in any given synaesthetic variant can also work on the opposite way. Most studies have documented the typical direction of the synaesthetic experience from the inducer to the concurrent. (...)
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  39.  19
    Synesthesia and Number Cognition in Children.Jennifer A. K. Green & Usha Goswami - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):463-473.
  40.  46
    Synaesthesia in a Logographic Language: The Colouring of Chinese Characters and Pinyin/Bopomo Spellings.Julia Simner, Wan-Yu Hung & Richard Shillcock - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1376-1392.
    Studies of linguistic synaesthesias in English have shown a range of fine-grained language mechanisms governing the associations between colours on the one hand, and graphemes, phonemes and words on the other. However, virtually nothing is known about how synaesthetic colouring might operate in non-alphabetic systems. The current study shows how synaesthetic speakers of Mandarin Chinese come to colour the logographic units of their language. Both native and non-native Chinese speakers experienced synaesthetic colours for characters, and for words spelled in the (...)
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  41.  17
    Mirror Synesthesia and the Limits of Misidentification.Michael Young - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (3):169-172.
    In Possibilities of Misidentification, Ashwell contends that the immunity principle developed and defended in my Pathologies of Thought and First Person Authority "doesn't show us anything about introspection or the first person—which should make us wonder whether it really captures that's at stake in discussions of IEM". Ashwell's argument hinges on two claims: IP turns on features that are not unique to introspection, to the first person, or to "subject matter that is thought to have IEM", and IP does not (...)
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  42. Synaesthesia and the Relevance of Phenomenal Structures in Perception.Michael Sollberger - 2009 - Abstracta 5 (2):139-153.
    The aim of the present paper is to sketch a new structural version of the Representative Theory of Perception which is supported both by conceptual and empirical arguments. To this end, I will discuss, in a first step, the structural approach to representation and show how it can be applied to perceptual consciousness. This discussion will demonstrate that perceptual experiences possess representational as well as purely sensational properties. In a second step, the focus will switch to empirical cases of (...). In particular, I will stress that certain synaesthetic experiences are well-suited to corroborating a structural account of the perceptual mind. The overall picture that emerges in this paper prompts a new view of perceptual consciousness that is ruthlessly structural. (shrink)
     
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  43.  33
    Synaesthesia: An Essay in Philosophical Psychology.Richard Gray - 2001 - Dissertation, University of Edinburgh
    We are sometimes led to a different picture of things when something unexpected occurs which needs explaining. The aim of this thesis is to examine a series of related issues in the philosophy of mind in the light of the unusual condition known to psychologists as ‘synaesthesia’. Although the emphasis will be on the philosophical issues a view of synaesthesia itself will also emerge. Synaesthesia is a distinct type of cross-modal association: stimulation of one sensory modality automatically (...)
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  44.  33
    Synesthesia in the Twentieth Century.Richard E. Cytowic - 2013 - In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. pp. 399.
    Synaesthesia's Renaissance comments on attitudes and developments in synaesthesia research during the 20th century, focusing in particular on the last three decades when the greatest change took place. During the last century, reaction to the phenomenon varied by group. Synesthetes were gratified to learn that their experience was bona fide and had a scientific name. Laypersons were fascinated and clamored to know more. Well-known psychologists published on it early in the century, but then academia became hostile. After 1940 (...)
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  45. Synesthesia: A Neurological and Cultural Revolution.Hervé-Pierre Lambert - 2015 - Iris 36:63-83.
    À partir des années 1980 eut lieu une véritable révolution dans la connaissance du phénomène neurologique de la synesthésie, qui s’est accompagnée d’une révolution culturelle avec l’apparition de témoignages personnels de synesthètes. Cette représentation littéraire et plastique des perceptions synesthésiques fait partie du mouvement contemporain de représentations autobiographiques de différentes conditions neurologiques. Carol Steen, Patricia Lynne Duffy et Marcia Smilack sont des acteurs pionniers de la représentation des perceptions synesthésiques. From the 1980s, a revolution took place in the knowledge of (...)
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  46.  21
    Social Synaesthesia: Expressive Bodies, Embodied Charisma.Peter Es Freund - 2009 - Body and Society 15 (4):21-31.
    This article introduces the notion of social synaesthesia as a means of theorizing about mindbody—society relationships. Following a brief discussion of synaesthesia, the concept of social synaesthesia is developed. This concept is then illustrated using photic experiences among devotees in a religious group. It is argued that these experiences illustrate the materialization or embodiment of the experience of charisma in a leader’s presence. It is also suggested that such experiences are more intense and vivid forms of the (...)
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  47.  56
    Mechanisms of Synesthesia: Cognitive and Physiological Constraints.Peter G. Grossenbacher & Christopher T. Lovelace - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):36-41.
  48.  11
    Sensory Blending: On Synaesthesia and Related Phenomena.Ophelia Deroy (ed.) - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    Synaesthesia is a strange sensory blending: synaesthetes report experiences of colours or tastes associated with particular sounds or words. This volume presents new essays by scientists and philosophers exploring what such cases can tell us about the nature of perception and its boundaries with illusion and imagination.
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  49.  17
    Synesthesia, Sequences, and Space.Clare Jonas & Michelle Jarick - 2013 - In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. pp. 123.
    In sequence-space synaesthesia, members of linguistic sequences such as numbers, days of the week and letters of the alphabet are perceived to occupy spatial positions, either in the mind's eye or as locations in space around the body. In this chapter, we begin by considering the possible sequences that can induce this type of synaesthesia, with the focus on numbers, time-units and letters. We evaluate the various methods used to test the genuineness of self-reports of this type of (...)
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  50.  69
    Synaesthesia and Misrepresentation: A Reply to Wager.Richard Gray - 2001 - Philosophical Psychology 14 (3):339-46.
    Wager has argued that synaesthesia provides material for a counterexample to representational theories of the phenomenal character of experience. He gives a series of three cases based on synaesthesia; he requires the second and third cases to bolster the doubtfulness of the first. Here I further endorse the problematic nature of the first case and then show why the other two cases do not save his argument. I claim that whenever synaesthesia is a credible possibility its phenomenal (...)
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