Results for 'Suzannah Clark'

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  1.  8
    Music theory and natural order from the Renaissance to the early twentieth century.Suzannah Clark & Alexander Rehding (eds.) - 2001 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Music theorists of almost all ages employ a concept of "Nature" to justify observations or statements about music. The understanding of what "Nature" is, however, is subject to cultural and historical differences. In tracing these explanatory strategies and their changes in music theories between c. 1600 and 1900, these essays explore (for the first time in a book-length study) how the multifarious conceptions of nature, located variously between scientific reason and divine power, are brought to bear on music theory and (...)
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  2.  17
    Patrice Bailhache. Une histoire de l'acoustique musicale. 199 pp., illus., figs., bibl., index. Paris: CNRS Editions, 2001. Fr 150 .Suzannah Clark;, Alexander Rehding . Music Theory and Natural Order from the Renaissance to the Early Twentieth Century. xii + 243 pp., illus., figs., bibl., index. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. $64.95. [REVIEW]Penelope Gouk - 2002 - Isis 93 (2):293-294.
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  3. Supersizing the mind: embodiment, action, and cognitive extension.Andy Clark (ed.) - 2008 - New York: Oxford University Press.
  4. The excellent 11: an award-winning teacher's guide to motivate, inspire, and educate kids.Ron Clark - 2023 - New York: Hachette.
    From the Disney 'Teacher of the Year' and New York Times bestselling author comes a road map to enrich students' learning experiences, revised and updated for today's teachers and parents. After publishing the New York Times bestseller The Essential 55 (over 1 million copies sold), award-winning teacher Ron Clark took his rules on the road and traveled to schools and districts in 50 states. He met amazing teachers, administrators, students, parents, and all kinds of people involved in bringing up (...)
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  5.  9
    Sight and embodiment in the Middle Ages.Suzannah Biernoff - 2002 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Sight and Embodiment in the Middle Ages breaks new ground by bringing postmodern writings on vision and embodiment into dialogue with medieval texts and images: an interdisciplinary strategy that illuminates and complicates both cultures. This is an invaluable reference work for anyone interested in the history and theory of visuality, and it is essential reading or scholars of art, science, or spirituality in the medieval period.
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  6.  2
    Sight and embodiment in the Middle Ages.Suzannah Biernoff - 2002 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This book breaks new ground by bringing postmodern writings on vision and embodiment into dialogue with medieval texts and images: an interdisciplinary strategy that illuminates and complicates both cultures. This is an invaluable reference work for anyone interested in the history and theory of visuality, and it is essential reading for scholars of art, science or spirituality in the medieval period.
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  7.  24
    Toward a physical biology.Suzannah Rutherford - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (6):397-397.
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  8. Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.Suzannah Bliss Tieman & Helmut Vb Hirsch - 1985 - In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: Wiley.
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  9. Debunking and Dispensability.Justin Clarke-Doane - 2016 - In Uri D. Leibowitz & Neil Sinclair (eds.), Explanation in Ethics and Mathematics: Debunking and Dispensability. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press UK.
    In his précis of a recent book, Richard Joyce writes, “My contention…is that…any epistemological benefit-of-the-doubt that might have been extended to moral beliefs…will be neutralized by the availability of an empirically confirmed moral genealogy that nowhere…presupposes their truth.” Such reasoning – falling under the heading “Genealogical Debunking Arguments” – is now commonplace. But how might “the availability of an empirically confirmed moral genealogy that nowhere… presupposes” the truth of our moral beliefs “neutralize” whatever “epistemological benefit-of-the-doubt that might have been extended (...)
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  10. Nietzsche and moral objectivity : the development of Nietzsche's metaethics.Maudemarie Clark & David Dudrick - 2007 - In Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (eds.), Nietzsche and morality. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 192--226.
  11. Modal Objectivity.Clarke-Doane Justin - 2019 - Noûs 53:266-295.
    It is widely agreed that the intelligibility of modal metaphysics has been vindicated. Quine's arguments to the contrary supposedly confused analyticity with metaphysical necessity, and rigid with non-rigid designators.2 But even if modal metaphysics is intelligible, it could be misconceived. It could be that metaphysical necessity is not absolute necessity – the strictest real notion of necessity – and that no proposition of traditional metaphysical interest is necessary in every real sense. If there were nothing otherwise “uniquely metaphysically significant” about (...)
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  12. What is an omission?Randolph Clarke - 2012 - Philosophical Issues 22 (1):127-143.
    This paper examines three views of what an omission or an instance of refraining is. The view advanced is that in many cases, an omission is simply an absence of an action of some type. However, generally one’s not doing a certain thing counts as an omission only if there is some norm, standard, or ideal that calls for one’s doing that thing.
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  13. Border Disputes: Recent Debates along the Perception–Cognition Border.Sam Clarke & Jacob Beck - 2023 - Philosophy Compass 18 (8):e12936.
    The distinction between perception and cognition frames countless debates in philosophy and cognitive science. But what, if anything, does this distinction actually amount to? In this introductory article, we summarize recent work on this question. We first briefly consider the possibility that a perception-cognition border should be eliminated from our scientific ontology, and then introduce and critically examine five positive approaches to marking a perception–cognition border, framed in terms of phenomenology, revisability, modularity, format, and stimulus-dependence.
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  14.  17
    Priyadarśikā, a Sanskrit Drama by HarshaPriyadarsika, a Sanskrit Drama by Harsha.Walter E. Clark, G. K. Nariman, A. V. Williams Jackson, Charles J. Ogden & Harsha - 1926 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 46:77.
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  15. A demonstration of the being and attributes of God.Samuel Clarke - 2007 - In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late modern philosophy: essential readings with commentary. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
  16. What is Logical Monism?Justin Clarke-Doane - forthcoming - In Christopher Peacocke & Paul Boghossian (eds.), Normative Realism.
    Logical monism is the view that there is ‘One True Logic’. This is the default position, against which pluralists react. If there were not ‘One True Logic’, it is hard to see how there could be one true theory of anything. A theory is closed under a logic! But what is logical monism? In this article, I consider semantic, logical, modal, scientific, and metaphysical proposals. I argue that, on no ‘factualist’ analysis (according to which ‘there is One True Logic’ expresses (...)
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  17.  12
    Occult powers and hypotheses: Cartesian natural philosophy under Louis XIV.Desmond M. Clarke - 1989 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This book analyses the concept of scientific explanation developed by French disciples of Descartes in the period 1660-1700. Clarke examines the views of authors such as Malebranche and Rohault, as well as those of less well-known authors such as Cordemoy, Gadroys, Poisson and R'egis. These Cartesian natural philosophers developed an understanding of scientific explanation as necessarily hypothetical, and, while they contributed little to new scientific discoveries, they made a lasting contribution to our concept of explanation--generations of scientists in subsequent centuries (...)
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  18.  31
    A demonstration of the being and attributes of God and other writings.Samuel Clarke (ed.) - 1998 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Samuel Clarke was by far the most gifted and influential Newtonian philosopher of his generation, and A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God, which constituted the 1704 Boyle Lectures, was one of the most important works of the first half of the eighteenth century, generating a great deal of controversy about the relation between space and God, the nature of divine necessary existence, the adequacy of the Cosmological Argument, agent causation, and the immateriality of the soul. Together with (...)
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  19. Microfunctionalism: Connectionism and the Scientific Explanation of Mental States.Andy Clark - 1989 - In Microcognition: Philosophy, Cognitive Science, and Parallel Distributed Processing. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    This is an amended version of material that first appeared in A. Clark, Microcognition: Philosophy, Cognitive Science, and Parallel Distributed Processing (MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1989), Ch. 1, 2, and 6. It appears in German translation in Metzinger,T (Ed) DAS LEIB-SEELE-PROBLEM IN DER ZWEITEN HELFTE DES 20 JAHRHUNDERTS (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp. 1999).
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  20.  59
    Paradoxes from A to Z.Michael Clark - 2002 - New York: Routledge.
    This essential guide to paradoxes takes the reader on a lively tour of puzzles that have taxed thinkers from Zeno to Galileo and Lewis Carroll to Bertrand Russell. Michael Clark uncovers an array of conundrums, such as Achilles and the Tortoise, Theseus' Ship, Hempel's Raven, and the Prisoners' Dilemma, taking in subjects as diverse as knowledge, ethics, science, art and politics. Clark discusses each paradox in non-technical terms, considering its significance and looking at likely solutions.
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  21.  5
    Jail break: Tallis and the prison of nature.Thomas W. Clark - 2022 - Human Affairs 32 (4):403-412.
    In Freedom: An Impossible Reality, Ray Tallis argues that we escape imprisonment by causal determinism, and thus gain free will, by the virtual distance from natural laws afforded us by intentionality, a human capacity that he claims cannot be naturalized. I respond that we can’t know in advance that intentionality will never be subsumed by science, and that our capacities to entertain possibilities and decide among them are natural cognitive endowments that supervene on generally reliable neural processes. Moreover, any disconnection (...)
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  22. Objectivity and Evaluation.Justin Clarke-Doane - forthcoming - In Christopher Cowie & Richard Rowland (eds.), Companions in Guilt: Arguments in Metaethics.
    I this article, I introduce the notion of pluralism about an area, and use it to argue that the questions at the center of our normative lives are not settled by the facts -- even the normative facts. One upshot of the discussion is that the concepts of realism and objectivity, which are widely identified, are actually in tension. Another is that the concept of objectivity, not realism, should take center stage.
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  23.  60
    The theory of your dreams.Clark Glymour - 1983 - In Robert S. Cohen & Larry Laudan (eds.), Physics, Philosophy and Psychoanalysis: Essays in Honor of Adolf Grünbaum. D. Reidel. pp. 57--71.
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  24. Discourse concerning the unchangeable obligations of natural religion.Samuel Clarke - 2007 - In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late modern philosophy: essential readings with commentary. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
  25.  27
    Making time for the past: local history and the polis.Katherine Clarke - 2008 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This book has two main and connected themes - the conception and articulation of time in the Greek world and the creation of history, especially in the context of the Greek city. Both how time is expressed and how the past is presented have often been seen as reflections of society. By looking at the construction of the past through the medium of local historiography, where we can view these issues in the relatively restricted world of individual city-states, we can (...)
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  26. That Special Something: Dennett on the Making of Minds and Selves.Andy Clark - 2002 - In Andrew Brook & Don Ross (eds.), Daniel Dennett. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 187--205.
    Dennett depicts human minds as both deeply different from, yet profoundly continuous with, the minds of other animals and simple agents. His treatments of mind, consciousness, free will and human agency all reflect this distinctive dual perspective. There is, on the one hand, the (in)famous Intentional Stance, relative to which humans, dogs, insects and even the lowly thermostat (e.g. Dennett (1998) p.327) are all pronounced capable of believing and desiring in essentially the same theoretical sense. And there is, on the (...)
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  27.  47
    Religious Commitment and Secular Reason.S. R. L. Clark - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):134-137.
    Many religious people are alarmed about features of the current age - violence in the media, a pervasive hedonism, a marginalization of religion, and widespread abortion. These concerns influence politics, but just as there should be a separation between church and state, so should there be a balance between religious commitments and secular arguments calling for social reforms. Robert Audi offers a principle of secular rationale, which does not exclude religious grounds for action but which rules out restricting freedom except (...)
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  28. Nietzsche's Doctrines of the Will to Power.Maudemarie Clark - 2001 - In John Richardson & Brian Leiter (eds.), Nietzsche. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  29. Leibniz'Theorie des Raums und die Existenz von Vakua: Uberlegungen zum Briefwechsel mit Clarke.Uberlegungen zum Briefwechsel mit Clarke - 2000 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 3:119.
  30.  53
    Explaining Behaviour: Reasons in a World of Causes.Andy Clark - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (158):95-102.
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  31. Vector space models of lexical meaning.Stephen Clark - 1996 - In Shalom Lappin & Chris Fox (eds.), Handbook of Contemporary Semantic Theory. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  32. The Leibniz-Clarke correspondence.Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz & Samuel Clarke - 2007 - In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late modern philosophy: essential readings with commentary. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
  33.  24
    Institutional Work and Complicit Decoupling across the U.S. Capital Markets: The Work of Rating Agencies.Cynthia E. Clark & Sue Newell - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):1-30.
    ABSTRACT:We focus on the core institution of the capital market and the institutional work of professional service firms that provide ratings on corporate issuers, initially in a bid to maintain this institution, which suffered when those involved relied solely on information from the issuers themselves. Through our analysis we identify a new type of decoupling—complicit decoupling. Complicit decoupling evolves over time, beginning with the creation of a new practice, here corporate ratings as a form of policing work, which emerges to (...)
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  34.  15
    Institutional Work and Complicit Decoupling across the U.S. Capital Markets: The Work of Rating Agencies.Cynthia E. Clark & Sue Newell - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):1-30.
    ABSTRACT:We focus on the core institution of the capital market and the institutional work of professional service firms that provide ratings on corporate issuers, initially in a bid to maintain this institution, which suffered when those involved relied solely on information from the issuers themselves. Through our analysis we identify a new type of decoupling—complicit decoupling. Complicit decoupling evolves over time, beginning with the creation of a new practice, here corporate ratings as a form of policing work, which emerges to (...)
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  35.  9
    Jung and Eastern thought: a dialogue with the Orient.John James Clarke - 1994 - New York: Routledge.
    Jung was fascinated by the east. Through his commentaries on such texts as the I Ching and The Tibetan Book of the Dead, and through his essays on such topics as Zen, meditation and the symbolism of the mandala, Jung attempted to build a bridge of understanding between western psychology and the ancient ideas and practices of eastern religion. By doing so he hoped to relate traditional eastern thought to modern western concerns. John Clarke's latest book seeks to uncover Jung's (...)
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  36. Dealing in futures: Folk psychology and the role of representations in cognitive science.Andy Clark - 1996 - In Robert N. McCauley (ed.), The Churchlands and their critics. Cambridge: Blackwell.
  37. Happy couplings: Emergence and explanatory interlock.Andy Clark - 1996 - In Margaret A. Boden (ed.), The philosophy of artificial life. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 262--281.
     
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  38. Observation and Intuition.Justin Clarke-Doane & Avner Ash - forthcoming - In Carolin Antos, Neil Barton & Venturi Giorgio (eds.), Palgrave Companion to the Philosophy of Set Theory.
    The motivating question of this paper is: ‘How are our beliefs in the theorems of mathematics justified?’ This is distinguished from the question ‘How are our mathematical beliefs reliably true?’ We examine an influential answer, outlined by Russell, championed by Gödel, and developed by those searching for new axioms to settle undecidables, that our mathematical beliefs are justified by ‘intuitions’, as our scientific beliefs are justified by observations. On this view, axioms are analogous to laws of nature. They are postulated (...)
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  39.  43
    Vanities of the eye: vision in early modern European culture.Stuart Clark - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Species : visions and values -- Fantasies : seeing without what was within -- Prestiges : illusions in magic and art -- Glamours : demons and virtual worlds -- Images : the reformation of the eyes -- Apparitions : the discernment of spirits -- Sights : King Saul and King Macbeth -- Seemings : philosophical scepticism -- Dreams : the epistemology of sleep -- Signs : vision and the new philosophy.
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  40. The Thomism of Norris Clarke. Rosario & Norris Clarke - 1999 - Philosophy and Theology 11 (2):265-285.
    William Norris Clarke, S.J., one of the leading Thomist scholars in the United States, came to the Philippines recently and delivered a series of lectures in the Ateneo de Manila University and the University of Santo Tomas on various philosophical topics inspired by the thought of St. Thomas. Fr. Clarke is now a Professor Emeritus of Philosophy in Fordham University. He was co-founder and editor (l961-85) of the International Philosophical Quarterly and is the author of some 60 articles, plus the (...)
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  41.  95
    A calculus of individuals based on "connection".Bowman L. Clarke - 1981 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 22 (3):204-218.
    Although Aristotle (Metaphysics, Book IV, Chapter 2) was perhaps the first person to consider the part-whole relationship to be a proper subject matter for philosophic inquiry, the Polish logician Stanislow Lesniewski [15] is generally given credit for the first formal treatment of the subject matter in his Mereology.1 Woodger [30] and Tarski [24] made use of a specific adaptation of Lesniewski's work as a basis for a formal theory of physical things and their parts. The term 'calculus of individuals' was (...)
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  42. Toward a credible agent-causal account of free will.Randolphe Clarke - 1995 - In Timothy O'Connor (ed.), Agents, Causes, and Events: Essays on Indeterminism and Free Will. Oxford University Press USA.
     
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  43.  12
    Metaphors and Realities.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2023 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 32 (1):30-44.
    The notion that metaphorical statements are strictly false suggests that all statements, even those that seemed ‘literal’, are false, as none can ‘literally’ reflect reality. Statements about what we perceive or could perceive rely on evoking sensory images of such ‘visibles’, even though we have no direct access to what others, may perceive. In addition to what is visible, we must also deal with ‘invisibilia’ (both the fantasms that respectable moderns now reject and the realities that lie beyond or before (...)
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  44.  15
    Iamblichus, De mysteriis. Iamblichus, Emma C. Clarke, John M. Dillon & Jackson P. Hershbell - 2004 - Boston: Brill. Edited by Emma C. Clarke, John M. Dillon & Jackson P. Hershbell.
    On the text and translation of the De mysteriis -- Iamblichus the man -- The De mysteriis : a defence of theurgy, and an answer to Porphyry's letter to Anebo -- Iamblichus's knowledge of Egyptian religion and mythology -- The nature and contents of De mysteriis -- Iamblichus, De mysteriis : text and translation.
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  45.  8
    “I am in favour of organ donation, but I feel you should opt-in”—qualitative analysis of the #options 2020 survey free-text responses from NHS staff toward opt-out organ donation legislation in England.Natalie L. Clark, Dorothy Coe, Natasha Newell, Mark N. A. Jones, Matthew Robb, David Reaich & Caroline Wroe - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-10.
    Background In May 2020, England moved to an opt-out organ donation system, meaning adults are presumed to be an organ donor unless within an excluded group or have opted-out. This change aims to improve organ donation rates following brain or circulatory death. Healthcare staff in the UK are supportive of organ donation, however, both healthcare staff and the public have raised concerns and ethical issues regarding the change. The #options survey was completed by NHS organisations with the aim of understanding (...)
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  46.  90
    Panpsychism and the religious attitude.D. S. Clarke - 2003 - Albany: State University of New York Press.
    In this bold, challenging book, D. S. Clarke outlines reasons for accepting panpsychism and defends the doctrine against its critics.
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  47.  8
    Marx, Marginalism and Modern Sociology: From Adam Smith to Max Weber.Simon Clarke - 1991 - London: Macmillan.
    Develops an interpretation of Marx's work as the basis of a critique of both orthodox Marxism and of both modern economics and sociology. The core of this book is an analysis of Marx's theory of alienated labour as the basis of Marx's critique of liberal social theory. This leads to both an original interpretation of Marx's work and to the liberal foundations of the subjects of economics and sociology. This critique is developed through an account of revolution, and of the (...)
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  48.  44
    Individuals and points.Bowman L. Clark - 1985 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 26 (1):61-75.
  49.  8
    The mysteries of religion: an introduction to philosophy through religion.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1986 - New York, NY, USA: Blackwell.
  50.  53
    Blameworthiness and Dependence.Randolph Clarke & Piers Rawling - 2024 - Philosophical Quarterly 74 (1):110-124.
    Some recent accounts of blameworthiness present this property as response-dependent: an agent is blameworthy, they say, if and only if, and (if so) in virtue of the fact that, it is fitting to respond to her with a certain blaming emotion. Given the explanatory aim of these views, the selected emotion cannot be said simply to appraise its object as blameworthy. We argue that articulation of the appraisal in other terms suggested by proponents yields a failure of the coextension required (...)
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