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Susanna Priest [4]Susanna Hornig Priest [3]
  1.  1
    Critical Science Literacy: What Citizens and Journalists Need to Know to Make Sense of Science.Susanna Priest - 2013 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 33 (5-6):138-145.
    Increasing public knowledge of science is a widely recognized goal, but what that knowledge might consist of is rarely unpacked. Existing measures of science literacy tend to focus on textbook knowledge of science. Yet constructing a meaningful list of facts, even facts in application, is not only difficult but less than satisfying as an indicator of what people actually know—or need to know—as citizens. Revisiting this concept from a more sociological perspective yields a rather different concept that is here termed (...)
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  2.  1
    Risk Communication for Nanobiotechnology: To Whom, About What, and Why?Susanna Hornig Priest - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):759-769.
    Regulatory oversight and public communication are intimately intertwined. Oversight failures quickly galvanize media and public attention. In addition, regulations sometimes require that risks and uncertainties be included in communication efforts aimed at non-experts outside of the regulatory and policy communities — whether in obtaining informed consent for novel medical treatments; by including risk information on drug labels, in drug advertisements, or on chemicals used in the workplace; in providing nutritional information on food packages; or by opening environmental impact assessments to (...)
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    Risk Communication for Nanobiotechnology: To Whom, about What, and Why?Susanna Hornig Priest - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):759-769.
    Regulatory oversight and public communication are intimately intertwined. Oversight failures, both actual and perceived, quickly galvanize attention from both the media and the public, as has occasionally happened in all of the historical cases with which this symposium is concerned — gene therapy, workplace chemicals, drugs and devices, and genetically modified organisms, especially those used as foods. Some developments, such as GMOs, seem to have more cultural significance or “cultural resonance” than others and are especially likely to garner public attention. (...)
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  4.  4
    Reading Hurricane Katrina: Information Sources and Decision‐making in Response to a Natural Disaster.Kenneth Campbell, Stephen Banning, Hilary Fussell Sisco, Susanna Priest & Karen Taylor - 2009 - Social Epistemology 23 (3):361-380.
    In this paper we analyze results from 114 face-to-face qualitative interviews of people who had evacuated from the New Orleans area in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, interviews that were completed within weeks of the 2005 storm in most cases. Our goal was to understand the role information and knowledge played in people's decisions to leave the area. Contrary to the conventional wisdom underlying many disaster communication studies, we found that our interviewees almost always had extensive storm-related information from a (...)
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  5. Biotechnology, nanotechnology, media, and public opinion.Susanna Priest - 2008 - In Kenneth H. David & Paul B. Thompson (eds.), What Can Nanotechnology Learn From Biotechnology?: Social and Ethical Lessons for Nanoscience From the Debate Over Agrifood Biotechnology and Gmos. Elsevier/Academic Press.
     
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  6.  4
    Reading Hurricane Katrina: Information Sources and Decision‐making in Response to a Natural Disaster.Karen Taylor, Susanna Priest, Hilary Fussell Sisco, Stephen Banning & Kenneth Campbell - 2009 - Social Epistemology 23 (3):361-380.
    In this paper we analyze results from 114 face-to-face qualitative interviews of people who had evacuated from the New Orleans area in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, interviews that were completed within weeks of the 2005 storm in most cases. Our goal was to understand the role information and knowledge played in people's decisions to leave the area. Contrary to the conventional wisdom underlying many disaster communication studies, we found that our interviewees almost always had extensive storm-related information from a (...)
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  7.  5
    Seeds of discontent: Expert opinion, mass media messages, and the public image of agricultural biotechnology. [REVIEW]Susanna Hornig Priest & Allen W. Gillespie - 2000 - Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):529-539.
    Survey data are presented on opinions about agricultural biotechnology and its applications held by agricultural science faculty at highly ranked programs in the United States with and without personal involvement in biotechnology-oriented research. Respondents believed biotech holds much promise, but policy positions vary. These results underscore the relationship between opinion and stakeholder interests in this research, even among scientific experts. Media accounts are often seen as causes, rather than artifacts, of the existence of public controversy; European and now U.S. opposition (...)
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