Results for 'Susan Staiger Gooding'

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  1.  14
    Susan Futrell: Good apples: behind every bite: University of Iowa Press, Iowa City, IA, 2017, 252 pp.Carol Pierce Colfer - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (3):735-736.
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  2. Good-for-nothings.Susan Wolf - 2010 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 85 (2):47-64.
    Many academic works as well as many works of art are such that if they had never been produced, no one would be worse off. Yet it is hard to resist the judgment that some such works are good nonetheless. We are rightly grateful that these works were created; we rightly admire them, appreciate them, and take pains to preserve them. And the authors and artists who produced them have reason to be proud. This should lead us to question the (...)
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  3. How good is the linguistic analogy?Susan Dwyer - 2006 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. Oxford University Press. pp. 145--167.
    A nativist moral psychology, modeled on the successes of theoretical linguistics, provides the best framework for explaining the acquisition of moral capacities and the diversity of moral judgment across the species. After a brief presentation of a poverty of the moral stimulus argument, this chapter sketches a view according to which a so-called Universal Moral Grammar provides a set of parameterizable principles whose specific values are set by the child's environment, resulting in the acquisition of a moral idiolect. The principles (...)
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  4. On Susan Wolf’s “Good-for-Nothings".Ben Bramble - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):1071-1081.
    According to welfarism about value, something is good simpliciter just in case it is good for some being or beings. In her recent Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, “Good-For-Nothings”, Susan Wolf argues against welfarism by appeal to great works of art, literature, music, and philosophy. Wolf provides three main arguments against this view, which I call The Superfluity Argument, The Explanation of Benefit Argument, and The Welfarist’s Mistake. In this paper, I reconstruct these arguments and explain where, (...)
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  5.  14
    Good work: its nature, its nurture.Susan Verducci & D. Gardner - 2005 - In Felicia A. Huppert, Nick Baylis & Barry Keverne (eds.), The Science of Well-Being. Oxford University Press. pp. 343--359.
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  6. Good work: its nature, its nurture.Susan Verducci & Gardner & Howard - 2005 - In Felicia A. Huppert, Nick Baylis & Barry Keverne (eds.), The Science of Well-Being. Oxford University Press.
     
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  7.  17
    Democracy and the good life in Spinoza's philosophy.Susan James - 2008 - In Charles Huenemann (ed.), Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
  8.  19
    Review: A World of Goods. [REVIEW]Susan Wolf - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):467 - 474.
    Contemporary moral philosophers often divide moral theories into three main types: consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics. In Finite and Infinite Goods, Robert Merrihew Adams presents an ethical framework that fits none of these categories. It is founded on a fundamental commitment to the idea that there is a Transcendent Good, to be understood philosophically in realist, non-naturalist terms. As I prefer to put it, Adams starts with a conviction that we live in a World of Goods. In developing and elaborating (...)
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  9.  9
    A World of Goods.Susan Wolf - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):467-474.
    Contemporary moral philosophers often divide moral theories into three main types: consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics. In Finite and Infinite Goods, Robert Merrihew Adams presents an ethical framework that fits none of these categories. It is founded on a fundamental commitment to the idea that there is a Transcendent Good, to be understood philosophically in realist, non-naturalist terms. As I prefer to put it, Adams starts with a conviction that we live in a World of Goods. In developing and elaborating (...)
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  10. The good, the bad and the ugly. Eliminating Quine's naturalism.Susan Haack - 2009 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 64 (1):75 - +.
  11. Meaningfulness: A Third Dimension of the Good Life.Susan Wolf - 2016 - Foundations of Science 21 (2):253-269.
    This paper argues that an adequate conception of a good life should recognize, in addition to happiness and morality, a third dimension of meaningfulness. It further proposes that we understand meaningfulness as involving both a subjective and an objective condition, suitably linked. Meaning arises when subjective attraction meets objective attractiveness. In other words one’s life is meaningful insofar as one is gripped or excited by things worthy of one’s love, and one is able to do something positive about it. The (...)
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  12. Happiness and Meaning: Two Aspects of the Good Life.Susan Wolf - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):207.
    The topic of self-interest raises large and intractable philosophical questions–most obviously, the question “In what does self-interest consist?” The concept, as opposed to the content of self-interest, however, seems clear enough. Self-interest is interest in one's own good. To act self-interestedly is to act on the motive of advancing one's own good. Whether what one does actually is in one's self-interest depends on whether it actually does advance, or at least, minimize the decline of, one's own good. Though it may (...)
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  13.  1
    1. Front Matter Front Matter.Jim Good, Jim Garrison, Leemon McHenry, Corey McCall, Susan Dunston, Zach VanderVeen, Melvin L. Rogers, James A. Dunson Iii, Mary Magada-Ward & Michael Sullivan - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2):158-170.
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  14. Happiness and meaning: Two aspects of the good life.Susan Wolf - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):207-225.
    The topic of self-interest raises large and intractable philosophical questions–most obviously, the question “In what does self-interest consist?” The concept, as opposed to the content of self-interest, however, seems clear enough. Self-interest is interest in one's own good. To act self-interestedly is to act on the motive of advancing one's own good. Whether what one does actually is in one's self-interest depends on whether it actually does advance, or at least, minimize the decline of, one's own good. Though it may (...)
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  15.  79
    Is meditation good for you?Susan Blackmore - unknown
    Are you tempted by the prospect of a reversal of ageing, increased intelligence, improved relationships or irreversible world peace? These are just some of the benefits of meditation promised by the Transcendental Meditation organisation. Admittedly, it doesn't seem very plausible. Such claims imply that sitting still silently repeating a phrase - one form of meditation practiced by the followers of the TM movement - can have profound physical, psychological and even sociological effects. Indeed, it sounds so implausible that many people (...)
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  16.  13
    Susan Lanzoni, Empathy: A History. New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 2018. Pp. ix + 392. ISBN 978-0-3002-2268-5. $30.00 . - Cathy Gere, Pain, Pleasure, and the Greater Good: From the Panopticon to the Skinner Box and Beyond. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2017. Pp. 282. ISBN 978-0-2265-0185-7. $30.00. [REVIEW]Rob Boddice - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (3):534-535.
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  17.  72
    A world of goods. [REVIEW]Susan Wolf - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):467–474.
    Contemporary moral philosophers often divide moral theories into three main types: consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics. In Finite and Infinite Goods, Robert Merrihew Adams presents an ethical framework that fits none of these categories. It is founded on a fundamental commitment to the idea that there is a Transcendent Good, to be understood philosophically in realist, non-naturalist terms. As I prefer to put it, Adams starts with a conviction that we live in a World of Goods. In developing and elaborating (...)
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  18. Firms find long-term rewards in doing good.Susan Vaughn - 1999 - Business Ethics 99:198-199.
     
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  19.  3
    Is God really good to the upright? Theological educators exploring Psalm 73 through the Jungian lenses of sensing, intuition, feeling and thinking.Leslie J. Francis, Susan H. Jones & Christopher F. Ross - 2020 - HTS Theological Studies 76 (1).
    Psalm 73 is a challenging Psalm in which the Psalmist draws on rich imagery to juxtapose doctrine and experience and to juxtapose the goodness of God with divine retribution. Drawing on data provided by 15 theological educators within the Anglican Diocese of Cyprus and the Gulf, this study tests the thesis that the imagery of Psalm 73 will be perceived differently by sensing types and by intuitive types and that the issue ‘Is God really good to the upright?’ will be (...)
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  20.  18
    Skinny Women and Good Mothers: The Rhetoric of Risk, Control, and Culpability in the Production of Knowledge about Breast Cancer.Susan Yadlon - 1997 - Feminist Studies 23 (3):645.
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  21. Knowledge for the good of the individual and society: linking philosophy, disciplinary goals, theory, and practice.Mary K. McCurry, Susan M. Hunter Revell & Callista Roy Sr - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (1):42-52.
    Nursing as a profession has a social mandate to contribute to the good of society through knowledge-based practice. Knowledge is built upon theories, and theories, together with their philosophical bases and disciplinary goals, are the guiding frameworks for practice. This article explores a philosophical perspective of nursing's social mandate, the disciplinary goals for the good of the individual and society, and one approach for translating knowledge into practice through the use of a middle-range theory. It is anticipated that the integration (...)
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  22.  11
    What Is Good Public Deliberation?Susan Dorr Goold, Michael A. Neblo, Scott Y. H. Kim, Raymond de Vries, Gene Rowe & Peter Muhlberger - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (2):24-26.
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  23.  9
    How should assent to research be sought in low income settings? Perspectives from parents and children in Southern Malawi.Helen Mangochi, Kate Gooding, Aisleen Bennett, Michael Parker, Nicola Desmond & Susan Bull - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):32.
    Paediatric research in low-income countries is essential to tackle high childhood mortality. As with all research, consent is an essential part of ethical practice for paediatric studies. Ethics guidelines recommend that parents or another proxy provide legal consent for children to participate, but that children should be involved in the decision through providing assent. However, there remain uncertainties about how to judge when children are ready to give assent and about appropriate assent processes. Malawi does not yet have detailed guidelines (...)
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  24.  6
    The natural goodness of man: On the system of Rousseau's thought.Susan M. Shell - 1994 - History of European Ideas 18 (4):623-624.
  25.  5
    Savant skills in autism: Psychometric approaches and parental reports.Patricia Howlin, Susan Goode, Jane Hutton & Michael Rutter - 2010 - In Francesca Happé & Uta Frith (eds.), Autism and Talent. Oup/the Royal Society.
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  26.  15
    Genetic research involving human biological materials: a need to tailor current consent forms.Sara Chandros Hull, Holly Gooding, Alison P. Klein, Esther Warshauer-Baker, Susan Metosky & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2004 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 26 (3):1.
  27.  10
    What do Schools Think Makes a Good Mathematics Teacher?Susan E. Sanders - 2002 - Educational Studies 28 (2):181-191.
    This paper describes the attributes of good mathematics teachers in the UK. These are derived from the material provided by 80 schools to applicants for mathematics teaching posts in the UK. The assumption is made that schools are trying to recruit the very best teacher and hence will have listed those attributes that they believe good teachers to have. Many of the attributes sought are not specifically about the teaching of mathematics. Indeed much about competency in the teaching of mathematics (...)
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  28.  2
    Health Care as a Social Good: Religious Values and American Democracy by David M. Craig.Susan I. Belanger - 2022 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 22 (2):393-396.
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  29.  6
    The red tape waltz. Where multi-centre ethical and research governance review can step on the toes of good research practice.Susan M. Webster & M. Temple-Smit - 2013 - Monash Bioethics Review 31 (1):77-98.
    How could it happen that the very processes intended to assure ethical research in Australia might, themselves, undermine good research practice?This paper describes one PhD candidate’s recent experiences of multicentre review for a Human Research Ethics Committee approved, low/negligible risk, qualitative study, at the crossroad of health services research and organisational research.A retrospective review of international literature about multi-centre review processes revealed that many of these experiences were not unique and might have been expected, notwithstanding Australian efforts at harmonisation of (...)
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  30.  13
    Goods, causes and intentions: problems with applying the doctrine of double effect to palliative sedation.Michel C. F. Shamy, Susan Lamb, Ainsley Matthewson, David G. Dick, Claire Dyason, Brian Dewar & Hannah Faris - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundPalliative sedation and analgesia are employed in patients with refractory and intractable symptoms at the end of life to reduce their suffering by lowering their level of consciousness. The doctrine of double effect, a philosophical principle that justifies doing a “good action” with a potentially “bad effect,” is frequently employed to provide an ethical justification for this practice. Main textWe argue that palliative sedation and analgesia do not fulfill the conditions required to apply the doctrine of double effect, and therefore (...)
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  31.  64
    Meaning in Life and Why It Matters.Susan Wolf - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    Most people, including philosophers, tend to classify human motives as falling into one of two categories: the egoistic or the altruistic, the self-interested or the moral. According to Susan Wolf, however, much of what motivates us does not comfortably fit into this scheme. Often we act neither for our own sake nor out of duty or an impersonal concern for the world. Rather, we act out of love for objects that we rightly perceive as worthy of love--and it is (...)
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  32.  75
    Book Review: Aquinas, Feminism and the Common Good. [REVIEW]Susan F. Parsons - 2005 - Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (2):113-115.
  33. DeCrane, Aquinas, Feminism and the Common Good.Susan F. Parsons - 2005 - Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (2):113.
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  34. Meaning in Life and Why It Matters (Markus Rüther).Susan Wolf - 2011 - Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 64 (3):308.
    Most people, including philosophers, tend to classify human motives as falling into one of two categories: the egoistic or the altruistic, the self-interested or the moral. According to Susan Wolf, however, much of what motivates us does not comfortably fit into this scheme. Often we act neither for our own sake nor out of duty or an impersonal concern for the world. Rather, we act out of love for objects that we rightly perceive as worthy of love--and it is (...)
     
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  35.  16
    An Ethical Marketing Approach to Wicked Problems: Macromarketing for the Common Good.Thomas G. Pittz, Susan D. Steiner & Julia R. Pennington - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (2):301-310.
    Macromarketing attempts to address issues that engage marketing and society and previous ethical scholarship has focused on distributive justice and on exchanges that occur in conventional markets. As our research highlights, however, the distributive justice approach alone is insufficient for managing the complexities, ethical paradoxes, and out-of-market conditions associated with wicked, cross-national social concerns. In this article, we integrate macromarketing with the theory of the common good in order to provide a foundation for framing societal change that can encompass nonmarket (...)
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  36.  3
    “Are we getting the biometric bioethics right?” – the use of biometrics within the healthcare system in Malawi.Mphatso Mwapasa, Kate Gooding, Moses Kumwenda, Marriott Nliwasa, Kruger Kaswaswa, Rodrick Sambakunsi, Michael Parker, Susan Bull & Nicola Desmond - 2020 - Global Bioethics 31 (1):67-80.
    Biometrics is the science of establishing the identity of an individual based on their physical attributes. Ethical concerns surrounding the appropriate use of biometrics have been raised, especial...
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  37.  18
    Can Businesses Be Too Good? Applying Susan Wolf's “Moral Saints” to Businesses.Earl Spurgin - 2011 - Business and Society Review 116 (3):355-373.
    ABSTRACTSusan Wolf famously argues that moral sainthood is not an ideal for which persons should aim because it requires one to cultivate moral virtues to the exclusion of significant, nonmoral interests, and skills. I find Wolf's argument compelling in her context of persons, and seek to demonstrate that it remains so when the context is expanded to businesses. I argue that just as moral perfection precludes individuals from challenging societal norms and traditions in ways that benefit us, moral perfection prevents (...)
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  38.  7
    Moral Clarity: A Guide for Grown-Up Idealists.Susan Neiman - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    For years, moral language has been the province of the Right, as the Left has consoled itself with rudderless pragmatism. In this profound and powerful book, Susan Neiman reclaims the vocabulary of morality--good and evil, heroism and nobility--as a lingua franca for the twenty-first century. In constructing a framework for taking responsible action on today's urgent questions, Neiman reaches back to the eighteenth century, retrieving a series of values--happiness, reason, reverence, and hope--held high by Enlightenment thinkers. In this thoroughly (...)
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  39.  2
    Artless Integrity: Moral Imagination, Agency, and Stories.Susan E. Babbitt - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Susan Babbitt dissects a common moral perspective for judging importance which she calls 'moral imagination.' In order to explain ourselves, and to recognize in others, what we often already perceive intuitively to be right or good, we instinctively create a story as a framework. She argues that we intentionally create stories which appear artless or chaotic, something capable of imperfection. This allows the story-maker to eventually deviate if he or she chooses, without a loss of hope, even if that (...)
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  40. Aristotle and the Rediscovery of Citizenship.Susan D. Collins - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle and the Rediscovery of Citizenship confronts a question that is central to Aristotle's political philosophy as well as to contemporary political theory: what is a citizen? Answers prove to be elusive, in part because late twentieth-century critiques of the Enlightenment called into doubt fundamental tenets that once guided us. Engaging the two major works of Aristotle's political philosophy, his Nicomachean Ethics and his Politics, Susan D. Collins poses questions that current discussions of liberal citizenship do not adequately address. (...)
     
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  41.  19
    Evil in Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy.Susan Neiman - 2015 - Princeton University Press.
    A compelling look at the problem of evil in modern thought, from the Inquisition to global terrorism Evil threatens human reason, for it challenges our hope that the world makes sense. For eighteenth-century Europeans, the Lisbon earthquake was manifest evil. Today we view evil as a matter of human cruelty, and Auschwitz as its extreme incarnation. Examining our understanding of evil from the Inquisition to contemporary terrorism, Susan Neiman explores who we have become in the three centuries that separate (...)
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  42.  68
    Impartiality in Moral and Political Philosophy.Susan Mendus - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    The debate between impartialists and their critics has dominated both moral and political philosophy for over a decade. Characteristically, impartialists argue that any sensible form of impartialism can accommodate the partial concerns we have for others. By contrast, partialists deny that this is so. They see the division as one which runs exceedingly deep and argue that, at the limit, impartialist thinking requires that we marginalise those concerns and commitments that make our lives meaningful. This book attempts to show both (...)
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  43.  2
    Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate: Unfashionable Essays.Susan Haack - 1998 - University of Chicago Press.
    Forthright and wryly humorous, philosopher Susan Haack deploys her penetrating analytic skills on some of the most highly charged cultural and social debates of recent years. Relativism, multiculturalism, feminism, affirmative action, pragmatisms old and new, science, literature, the future of the academy and of philosophy itself—all come under her keen scrutiny in _Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate_. "The virtue of Haack's book, and I mean _virtue_ in the ethical sense, is that it embodies the attitude that it exalts... Haack's (...)
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  44.  15
    The Professions: Public Interest and Common Good.Bruce Jennings, Daniel Callahan & Susan M. Wolf - 1987 - Hastings Center Report 17 (1):3-10.
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  45.  4
    The Politics of Toleration in Modern Life.Susan Mendus (ed.) - 2000 - Duke University Press.
    In _The Politics of Toleration in Modern Life _Susan Mendus gathers a group of distinguished public figures—philosophers, historians, lawyers, and religious leaders—to reflect on a core issue within contemporary political debate. At the close of a century that will be remembered for its two world wars and its eruptions of genocide, the contributors examine the importance of an insistence on tolerance and the dangers of its lack, both historically and in the present day. How can toleration be fostered in a (...)
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  46.  49
    Listening and Normative Entanglement: A Pragmatic Foundation for Conversational Ethics.Susan Notess - 2021 - Dissertation, Durham University
    People care very much about being listened to. In everyday talk, we make moral-sounding judgements of people as listeners: praising a doctor who listens well even if she does not have a ready solution, or blaming a boss who does not listen even if the employee manages to get her situation addressed. In this sense, listening is a normative behaviour: that is, we ought to be good listeners. Whilst several disciplines have addressed the normative importance of interpersonal listening—particularly in sociology, (...)
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  47.  65
    Evil in Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy.Susan Neiman - 2002 - Princeton University Press.
    The book is written with grace and wit; again and again, Neiman writes the kind of sentences we dream of uttering in the perfect conversation: where every mot is bon. This is exemplary philosophy.
  48. Brentano's Theodicy.Susan Lufkin Krantz - 1980 - Dissertation, Brown University
    Franz Brentano's remarks on theodicy presuppose both his ethical and his metaphysical views. But he does not tell us precisely how his ethics and his metaphysics are supposed to relate to one another. Indeed, the two appear to be irreconcilable. So I try to show how Brentano's solution to the problem of evil can disclose to us the relation between his ethics and his metaphysics. First I discuss those of his ethical principles which I take to be relevant to theodicy, (...)
     
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  49. Hegel or Spinoza.Susan M. Ruddick (ed.) - 2011 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    _Hegel or Spinoza_ is the first English-language translation of the modern classic _Hegel ou Spinoza._ Published in French in 1979, it has been widely influential, particularly in the work of the philosophers Alain Badiou, Antonio Negri, and Gilles Deleuze. _Hegel or Spinoza_ is a surgically precise interrogation of the points of misreading of Spinoza by Hegel. Pierre Macherey explains the necessity of Hegel’s misreading in the kernel of thought that is “indigestible” for Hegel, which makes the Spinozist system move in (...)
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  50.  12
    Being Morally Responsible for an Action Versus Acting Responsibly or Irresponsibly.Susan Leigh Anderson - 1995 - Journal of Philosophical Research 20:451-462.
    In her article “Asymmetrical Freedom,” and more recently in her book Freedom Within Reason, Susan Wolf claims to have given us a new theory to account for when we can be held morally responsible for our actions. I believe that she has confused “being morally responsible for an action” with “acting responsibly or irresponsibly.” I will argue that Wolf has given us a nice analysis of the latter concepts, but not of the former one as she intended. I do (...)
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