Results for 'Susan Lang'

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  1.  97
    Vulnerability in Research Ethics: A Way Forward.Margaret Meek Lange, Wendy Rogers & Susan Dodds - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (6):333-340.
    Several foundational documents of bioethics mention the special obligation researchers have to vulnerable research participants. However, the treatment of vulnerability offered by these documents often relies on enumeration of vulnerable groups rather than an analysis of the features that make such groups vulnerable. Recent attempts in the scholarly literature to lend philosophical weight to the concept of vulnerability are offered by Luna and Hurst. Luna suggests that vulnerability is irreducibly contextual and that Institutional Review Boards (Research Ethics Committees) can only (...)
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  2.  12
    Converging (or Colliding) Traditions: Integrating Hypertext Into Literary Studies.Susan Lang - 1997 - In Philip G. Cohen (ed.), Texts and Textuality: Textual Instability, Theory, and Interpretation. Garland. pp. 1891--291.
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  3.  37
    How Interesting is the “Boring Problem” for Luck Egalitarianism?Gerald Lang - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (3):698-722.
    Imagine a two-person distributive case in which Ernest's choices yield X and Bertie's choices yield X + Y, producing an income gap between them of Y. Neither Ernest nor Bertie is responsible for this gap of Y, since neither of them has any control over what the other agent chooses. This is what Susan Hurley calls the “Boring Problem” for luck egalitarianism. Contrary to Hurley's relatively dismissive treatment of it, it is contended that the Boring Problem poses a deep (...)
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  4.  8
    Horst H. Freyhofer. The Nuremberg Medical Trial: The Holocaust and the Origin of the Nuremberg Medical Code. Viii + 209 Pp., Illus., Index. New York: Peter Lang, 2004. $35.95 .Paul Julian Weindling. Nazi Medicine and the Nuremberg Trials: From Medical War Crimes to Informed Consent. Xii + 482 Pp., Illus., Index. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. $80. [REVIEW]Susan E. Lederer - 2007 - Isis 98 (2):424-425.
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  5. Past, Present, and Future Research on Teacher Induction: An Anthology for Researchers, Policy Makers, and Practitioners.Betty Achinstein, Krista Adams, Steven Z. Athanases, EunJin Bang, Martha Bleeker, Cynthia L. Carver, Yu-Ming Cheng, Renée T. Clift, Nancy Clouse, Kristen A. Corbell, Sarah Dolfin, Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Maida Finch, Jonah Firestone, Steven Glazerman, MariaAssunção Flores, Susan Hanson, Lara Hebert, Richard Holdgreve-Resendez, Erin T. Horne, Leslie Huling, Eric Isenberg, Amy Johnson, Richard Lange, Julie A. Luft, Pearl Mack, Julia Moore, Jennifer Neakrase, Lynn W. Paine, Edward G. Pultorak, Hong Qian, Alan J. Reiman, Virginia Resta, John R. Schwille, Sharon A. Schwille, Thomas M. Smith, Randi Stanulis, Michael Strong, Dina Walker-DeVose, Ann L. Wood & Peter Youngs - 2010 - R&L Education.
    This book's importance is derived from three sources: careful conceptualization of teacher induction from historical, methodological, and international perspectives; systematic reviews of research literature relevant to various aspects of teacher induction including its social, cultural, and political contexts, program components and forms, and the range of its effects; substantial empirical studies on the important issues of teacher induction with different kinds of methodologies that exemplify future directions and approaches to the research in teacher induction.
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  6.  22
    Rubens, Corsets and Taxonomies: A Response to Meek Lange, Rogers and Dodds.Florencia Luna - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (6):448-450.
    This short article is a commentary to ‘Vulnerability in Research Ethics: A way forward’ from Margaret Meek Lange, Wendy Rogers and Susan Dodds. In their article they describe and accept my criticisms of the subpopulation approach to vulnerability and my analysis of vulnerability based on layers, but they suggest going beyond it using a taxonomy to classify layers of vulnerabilty. I argue that a) we do not need a taxonomy to classify vulnerabilities, b) the authors do not provide an (...)
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  7.  30
    Values and Planning: The Argument From Renaissance Utopianism.Roger Paden - 2001 - Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (1):5 – 30.
    This paper seeks to discover if urban planning has any 'internal values' which might help guide its practitioners and provide standards with which to judge their works, thereby providing for some disciplinary autonomy. After arguing that such values can best be discovered through an examination of the history of utopian urban planning, I examine one period in that history, the early Renaissance and, in particular, the work of Leon Battista Alberti. Against Susan Lang's thesis that Alberti's work was (...)
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  8.  5
    Susan Bordo. Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1993. - Judith Butler. Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of Sex. New York, Routledge, 1993.Susan Heckman - 1995 - Hypatia 10 (4):151-157.
  9. I—Susan James: Creating Rational Understanding: Spinoza as a Social Epistemologist.Susan James - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):181-199.
    Does Spinoza present philosophy as the preserve of an elite, while condemning the uneducated to a false though palliative form of ‘true religion’? Some commentators have thought so, but this contribution aims to show that they are mistaken. The form of religious life that Spinoza recommends creates the political and epistemological conditions for a gradual transition to philosophical understanding, so that true religion and philosophy are in practice inseparable.
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  10. Luck and Equality: Susan Hurley.Susan Hurley - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):51–72.
    [ Susan Hurley] I argue that the aim to neutralize the influence of luck on distribution cannot provide a basis for egalitarianism: it can neither specify nor justify an egalitarian distribution. Luck and responsibility can play a role in determining what justice requires to be redistributed, but from this we cannot derive how to distribute: we cannot derive a pattern of distribution from the 'currency' of distributive justice. I argue that the contrary view faces a dilemma, according to whether (...)
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  11.  21
    Susan Dodds' Reply.Susan Dodds - 2002 - Monash Bioethics Review 21 (3):S43-S48.
    In Australia, Human Research Ethics Committees have a vital role to play—as the primary institutional mechanism for ethical review of research—in protecting research participants, and promoting ethical research. Their ability to act effectively in this role is currently threatened by the limited support they receive and their burgeoning workloads. In this discussion paper, I trace some of the factors contributing to what I describe as a resource crisis in human research ethics. I suggest a review of the working of HRECs (...)
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  12.  28
    Susan," Local, Global, Regional: Women's Studies in Australia".Susan& Sheridan Magarey - 2002 - Feminist Studies 28:1.
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  13.  22
    Luck And Equality: Susan Hurley.Susan Hurley - 2001 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 75 (1):51-72.
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  14.  39
    XIII. Passion and Politics1: Susan James.Susan James - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:221-234.
    The sudden resurgence of interest in the emotions that has recently overtaken analytical philosophy has raised a range of questions about the place of the passions in established explanatory schemes. How, for example, do the emotions fit into theories of action organized around beliefs and desires? How can they be included in analyses of the mind developed to account for other mental states and capacities? Questions of this general form also arise within political philosophy, and the wish to acknowledge their (...)
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  15.  52
    Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization.Maria Kronfeldner (ed.) - 2021 - London, New York: Routledge.
    A striking feature of atrocities, as seen in genocides, civil wars or violence against certain racial and ethnic groups, is the attempt to dehumanize – to deny and strip human beings of their humanity. Yet the very nature of dehumanization remains relatively poorly understood. The Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization is the first comprehensive and multidisciplinary reference source on the subject and an outstanding survey of the key concepts, issues and debates within dehumanization studies. Organized into four parts, the Handbook covers (...)
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  16.  23
    The Green Ray.Andrew Hunt - unknown
    This title sees the re-emergence of the seminal 1970s magazine Curtains edited by Paul Buck. With its early promotion of French writers such as Georges Bataille, Maurice Blanchot, Jacques Derrida, Jean-Pierre Faye and Edmond Jabès, Curtains’ re-appearance in 2016 arrives after an exhibition at Focal Point Gallery in 2012 that was recreated from an earlier 1992 work at Cabinet Gallery around the concept of ‘disappearing’. The invited contributions come from thirteen artists with whom the editor has engaged over the years. (...)
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  17.  96
    Speech, Harm, and the Mind-Body Problem in First Amendment Jurisprudence: Susan J. Brison.Susan J. Brison - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (1):39-61.
    “Sucks and stones will break my bones,” Justice Scalia pronounced from the bench in oral arguments in Schenck v. Pro-Choice Network, “but words can never hurt me. That's the First Amendment,” he added. Jay Alan Sekulow, the lawyer for the petitioners, anti-abortion protesters who had been enjoined from moving closer than fifteen feet away from those entering an abortion facility, was obviously pleased by this characterization of the right to free speech, replying, “That's certainly our position on it, and that (...)
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  18. Counterfactuals All the Way Down?: Marc Lange: Laws and Lawmakers: Science, Metaphysics, and the Laws of Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, 280 Pp, $99 HB, $24.95 PB.Jim Woodward, Barry Loewer, John W. Carroll & Marc Lange - 2011 - Metascience 20 (1):27-52.
    Counterfactuals all the way down? Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9437-9 Authors Jim Woodward, History and Philosophy of Science, 1017 Cathedral of Learning, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA Barry Loewer, Department of Philosophy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA John W. Carroll, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8103, USA Marc Lange, Department of Philosophy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB#3125—Caldwell Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3125, USA Journal Metascience Online (...)
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  19. The Origin of Concepts.Susan Carey - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Only human beings have a rich conceptual repertoire with concepts like tort, entropy, Abelian group, mannerism, icon and deconstruction. How have humans constructed these concepts? And once they have been constructed by adults, how do children acquire them? While primarily focusing on the second question, in The Origin of Concepts , Susan Carey shows that the answers to both overlap substantially. Carey begins by characterizing the innate starting point for conceptual development, namely systems of core cognition. Representations of core (...)
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  20. What Makes a Scientific Explanation Distinctively Mathematical?Marc Lange - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (3):485-511.
    Certain scientific explanations of physical facts have recently been characterized as distinctively mathematical –that is, as mathematical in a different way from ordinary explanations that employ mathematics. This article identifies what it is that makes some scientific explanations distinctively mathematical and how such explanations work. These explanations are non-causal, but this does not mean that they fail to cite the explanandum’s causes, that they abstract away from detailed causal histories, or that they cite no natural laws. Rather, in these explanations, (...)
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  21.  33
    The Varieties of Emotional Experience: A Meditation on James-Lange Theory.Peter J. Lang - 1994 - Psychological Review 101 (2):211-221.
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  22. Consciousness in Action.Susan L. Hurley - 1998 - Harvard University Press.
    In this important book, Susan Hurley sheds new light on consciousness by examining its relationships to action from various angles. She assesses the role of agency in the unity of a conscious perspective, and argues that perception and action are more deeply interdependent than we usually assume. A standard view conceives perception as input from world to mind and action as output from mind to world, with the serious business of thought in between. Hurley criticizes this picture, and considers (...)
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  23.  22
    Lange and Nietzsche.George J. Stack - 1983 - W. De Gruyter.
    Introduction Friedrich Albert Lange has sometimes been mentioned in relation to the pyrotechnical writings of Nietzsche and, on occasion, has been said to ...
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  24. Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech.Susan Hurley - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):165-218.
  25.  43
    C. I. Lewis: Susan Haack.Susan Haack - 1985 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 19:215-238.
    Lewis, according to Kuklick, was ‘a private person’, of ‘unsparing honesty and … utter dedication to the rational pursuit of truth’. He was, Kuklick continues, ‘equally uncompromising in what he expected of his readers, and as a result wrote for and lectured to a tiny group of scholars’. I hope that—since I occasionally find myself borrowing from him and frequently find myself arguing with him—I may count myself as one of the ‘tiny group of scholars’ for whom Lewis wrote. And (...)
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  26. Natural Laws in Scientific Practice.Marc Lange - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    It is often presumed that the laws of nature have special significance for scientific reasoning. But the laws' distinctive roles have proven notoriously difficult to identify--leading some philosophers to question if they hold such roles at all. This study offers original accounts of the roles that natural laws play in connection with counterfactual conditionals, inductive projections, and scientific explanations, and of what the laws must be in order for them to be capable of playing these roles. Particular attention is given (...)
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  27. Aspects of Mathematical Explanation: Symmetry, Unity, and Salience.Marc Lange - 2014 - Philosophical Review 123 (4):485-531.
    Unlike explanation in science, explanation in mathematics has received relatively scant attention from philosophers. Whereas there are canonical examples of scientific explanations, there are few examples that have become widely accepted as exhibiting the distinction between mathematical proofs that explain why some mathematical theorem holds and proofs that merely prove that the theorem holds without revealing the reason why it holds. This essay offers some examples of proofs that mathematicians have considered explanatory, and it argues that these examples suggest a (...)
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  28. Freedom Within Reason.Susan Wolf - 1990 - Oup Usa.
    In Freedom Within Reason, Susan Wolf charts a course between incompatibilism, or the notion that freedom and responsibility require causal and metaphysical independence from the impersonal forces of nature, and compatibilism, or the notion that people are free and responsible as long as their actions are governed by their desires. Wolf argues that some of the forces which are beyond our control are friends to freedom rather than enemies of it, enabling us to see the world for what it (...)
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  29.  7
    Evil in Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy.Susan Neiman - 2015 - Princeton University Press.
    A compelling look at the problem of evil in modern thought, from the Inquisition to global terrorism Evil threatens human reason, for it challenges our hope that the world makes sense. For eighteenth-century Europeans, the Lisbon earthquake was manifest evil. Today we view evil as a matter of human cruelty, and Auschwitz as its extreme incarnation. Examining our understanding of evil from the Inquisition to contemporary terrorism, Susan Neiman explores who we have become in the three centuries that separate (...)
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  30.  62
    Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo.Susan E. Bernick - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  31. Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body.Susan Bordo - 1993 - University of California Press.
    In this provocative book, Susan Bordo untangles the myths, ideologies, and pathologies of the modern female body. Bordo explores our tortured fascination with food, hunger, desire, and control, and its effects on women's lives.
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  32. Lange’s Challenge: Accounting for Meta-Laws.Zanja Yudell - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (2):347-369.
    Lange issues a novel challenge to philosophical accounts of laws of nature. He notes that the laws of nature seem to be themselves governed by laws analogous to the way that the laws govern particular facts. These higher order laws are the meta-laws of nature. He claims that if a philosophical account of laws aims to accurately characterize the laws, it should be able to account for these meta-laws. To generalize this challenge, I introduce the notion of roles played by (...)
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  33. Natural Laws and the Problem of Provisos.Marc Lange - 1993 - Erkenntnis 38 (2):233Ð248.
    Hempel and Giere contend that the existence of provisos poses grave difficulties for any regularity account of physical law. However, Hempel and Giere rely upon a mistaken conception of the way in which statements acquire their content. By correcting this mistake, I remove the problem Hempel and Giere identify but reveal a different problem that provisos pose for a regularity account — indeed, for any account of physical law according to which the state of affairs described by a law-statement presupposes (...)
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  34.  43
    Reply to My Critics: On Explanations by Constraint: Marc Lange: Because Without Cause: Non-Causal Explanation in Science and Mathematics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, Xxii+489pp, $74.00 HB.Marc Lange - 2018 - Metascience 27 (1):27-36.
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  35. Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women?Susan Moller Okin (ed.) - 1999 - Princeton University Press.
    Polygamy, forced marriage, female genital mutilation, punishing women for being raped, differential access for men and women to health care and education, unequal rights of ownership, assembly, and political participation, unequal vulnerability to violence. These practices and conditions are standard in some parts of the world. Do demands for multiculturalism — and certain minority group rights in particular — make them more likely to continue and to spread to liberal democracies? Are there fundamental conflicts between our commitment to gender equity (...)
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  36.  20
    Meaning in Life and Why It Matters.Susan Wolf - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    Most people, including philosophers, tend to classify human motives as falling into one of two categories: the egoistic or the altruistic, the self-interested or the moral. According to Susan Wolf, however, much of what motivates us does not comfortably fit into this scheme. Often we act neither for our own sake nor out of duty or an impersonal concern for the world. Rather, we act out of love for objects that we rightly perceive as worthy of love--and it is (...)
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  37. What Are Mathematical Coincidences ?M. Lange - 2010 - Mind 119 (474):307-340.
    Although all mathematical truths are necessary, mathematicians take certain combinations of mathematical truths to be ‘coincidental’, ‘accidental’, or ‘fortuitous’. The notion of a ‘ mathematical coincidence’ has so far failed to receive sufficient attention from philosophers. I argue that a mathematical coincidence is not merely an unforeseen or surprising mathematical result, and that being a misleading combination of mathematical facts is neither necessary nor sufficient for qualifying as a mathematical coincidence. I argue that although the components of a mathematical coincidence (...)
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  38.  27
    The Material of Knowledge: Feminist Disclosures.Susan Hekman (ed.) - 2010 - Indiana University Press.
    Susan Hekman believes we are witnessing an intellectual sea change. The main features of this change are found in dichotomies between language and reality, discourse and materiality. Hekman proposes that it is possible to find a more intimate connection between these pairs, one that does not privilege one over the other. By grounding her work in feminist thought and employing analytic philosophy, scientific theory, and linguistic theory, Hekman shows how language and reality can be understood as an indissoluble unit. (...)
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  39. Yi Xiang Zhao Liang Ren Sheng: Ye Lang Zi Xuan Ji.Lang Ye - 2011 - Shou du Shi Fan da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  40. Meaning in Life and Why It Matters (Markus Rüther).Susan Wolf - 2011 - Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 64 (3):308.
    Most people, including philosophers, tend to classify human motives as falling into one of two categories: the egoistic or the altruistic, the self-interested or the moral. According to Susan Wolf, however, much of what motivates us does not comfortably fit into this scheme. Often we act neither for our own sake nor out of duty or an impersonal concern for the world. Rather, we act out of love for objects that we rightly perceive as worthy of love--and it is (...)
     
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  41.  80
    How Can Instantaneous Velocity Fulfill its Causal Role?Marc Lange - 2005 - Philosophical Review 114 (4):433-468.
  42. "Justifying Toleration", Ed. Susan Mendus. [REVIEW]Susan James - 1989 - Ratio 2 (2):196.
  43.  77
    Women in Western Political Thought.Susan Moller Okin - 1980 - Princeton University Press.
    Susan Moller Okin. AFTERWORD or greater weighting of these over “masculine" values. For how are women to continue to assume all of the nurturing activities that allegedly both follow from and reinforce their “naturally” superior virtues, and  ...
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  44. Neural Plasticity and Consciousness: Reply to Block.Susan Hurley & Alva Noë - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):342.
    Susan Hurley Susan Hurley Susan Hurley Susan Hurley1111 andAlva Noë andAlva Noë andAlva Noë andAlva Noë2222.
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  45.  79
    Depth and Explanation in Mathematics.Marc Lange - 2015 - Philosophia Mathematica 23 (2):196-214.
    This paper argues that in at least some cases, one proof of a given theorem is deeper than another by virtue of supplying a deeper explanation of the theorem — that is, a deeper account of why the theorem holds. There are cases of scientific depth that also involve a common abstract structure explaining a similarity between two otherwise unrelated phenomena, making their similarity no coincidence and purchasing depth by answering why questions that separate, dissimilar explanations of the two phenomena (...)
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  46. Kites, Models and Logic: Susan Sterrett Investigates Models in Wittgenstein's World.Susan G. Sterrett - 2008/9 - Interview About Book for SimplyCharly.Com.
    This is the text of Dr. Sterrett's replies to an interviewer's questions for simplycharly.com, a website with interviews by academics on various authors, philosophers, and scientists.
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  47.  24
    How Do Expectations Shape Perception?Floris P. de Lange, Micha Heilbron & Peter Kok - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (9):764-779.
  48. Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.Susan James - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Passion and Action is an exploration of the role of the passions in seventeenth-century thought. Susan James offers fresh readings of a broad range of thinkers, including such canonical figures as Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke, and shows that a full understanding of their philosophies must take account of their interpretations of our affective life. This ground-breaking study throws new light upon the shaping of our ideas about the mind, knowledge, and action, and provides a historical context (...)
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  49.  4
    Aftermath: Violence and the Remaking of a Self.Susan J. Brison - 2003 - Princeton University Press.
    On July 4, 1990, while on a morning walk in southern France, Susan Brison was attacked from behind, severely beaten, sexually assaulted, strangled to unconsciousness, and left for dead. She survived, but her world was destroyed. Her training as a philosopher could not help her make sense of things, and many of her fundamental assumptions about the nature of the self and the world it inhabits were shattered.At once a personal narrative of recovery and a philosophical exploration of trauma, (...)
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  50.  29
    Marxism and Literature.Berel Lang - 1978 - Philosophical Review 87 (4):642-644.
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