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  1.  10
    Sciences and the Global: On Methods, Questions, and Theory.Sujit Sivasundaram - 2010 - Isis 101 (1):146-158.
  2.  13
    Introduction.Sujit Sivasundaram - 2010 - Isis 101 (1):95-97.
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  3.  82
    Towards a New History of Science and Religion.Sujit Sivasundaram - 2005 - Metascience 14 (3):431-434.
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  4.  19
    Race, Empire, and Biology Before Darwinism.Sujit Sivasundaram - 2010 - In Denis Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.), Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins. University of Chicago Press.
    In the first half of the nineteenth century, race and science were interconnected. The emergence of a science of race has been mistakenly aligned with the spread of Darwinism across the imperial realms. The sciences were central to the identification of racial and national types and thus were an important part of the framework that upheld empire. Biology showed how races and peoples could be “improved,” providing a justification for rule by the supposedly superior colonizers and neutralizing the question of (...)
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  5.  18
    Felix Driver and Luciana Martins Tropical Visions in an Age of Empire. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2005. Pp. Xii+279. ISBN 0-226-16472-1. $25.00, £16.00 .David Arnold, The Tropics and the Traveling Gaze: India, Landscape, and Science, 1800–1856. Seattle and London: University of Washington Press, 2006. Pp. Xiv+298. ISBN 0-295-98581-X. $50.00, £32.95. [REVIEW]Sujit Sivasundaram - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Science 41 (3).
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  6.  14
    Helaine Selin , Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures, Second Edition. 2 Vols. Berlin, Heidelberg and New York: Springer, 2008. Pp. Xix+2416. ISBN 978-1-4020-4559-2. £355.00. [REVIEW]Sujit Sivasundaram - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Science 43 (2):284-285.
  7.  8
    Epilogue.Pablo F. Gómez & Sujit Sivasundaram - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Science 51 (4):679-686.
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  8.  11
    Kapil Raj. Relocating Modern Science: Circulation and the Construction of Knowledge in South Asia and Europe, 1650–1900. Xiii + 285 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. $74.95. [REVIEW]Sujit Sivasundaram - 2008 - Isis 99 (2):384-385.
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  9.  6
    Tony Ballantyne , Science, Empire and the European Exploration of the Pacific.The Pacific World: Lands, Peoples and History of the Pacific, 1500–1900. Vol. 6. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004. Pp. XXXV+367. Isbn 0-7546-3562-7. £75.00. [REVIEW]Sujit Sivasundaram - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Science 39 (4):591-593.
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  10.  3
    Harry Liebersohn. The Travelers’ World: Europe to the Pacific. Xiii + 380 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: Harvard University Press, 2005. $29.95. [REVIEW]Sujit Sivasundaram - 2007 - Isis 98 (4):850-851.
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  11.  7
    Natural History Spiritualized: Civilizing Islanders, Cultivating Breadfruit, and Collecting Souls.Sujit Sivasundaram - 2001 - History of Science 39 (4):417-443.
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  12.  5
    Introduction (FOCUS: GLOBAL HISTORIES OF SCIENCE).Sujit Sivasundaram - 2010 - Isis 101:95-97.
    An interest in global histories of science is not new. Yet the project envisioned by this Focus section is different from that pursued by natural historians and natural philosophers in the early modern age. Instead of tracing universal patterns, there is value in attending to the connections and disconnections of science on the global stage. Instead of assuming the precision of science's boundaries, historians might consider the categories of “science” and “indigenous knowledge” to have emerged from globalization. New global histories (...)
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