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  1.  47
    Such stuff as dreams are made on? Elaborative encoding, the ancient art of memory, and the hippocampus.Sue Llewellyn - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):589-607.
    This article argues that rapid eye movement (REM) dreaming is elaborative encoding for episodic memories. Elaborative encoding in REM can, at least partially, be understood through ancient art of memory (AAOM) principles: visualization, bizarre association, organization, narration, embodiment, and location. These principles render recent memories more distinctive through novel and meaningful association with emotionally salient, remote memories. The AAOM optimizes memory performance, suggesting that its principles may predict aspects of how episodic memory is configured in the brain. Integration and segregation (...)
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  2.  61
    If waking and dreaming consciousness became de-differentiated, would schizophrenia result?Sue Llewellyn - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1059-1083.
    If both waking and dreaming consciousness are functional, their de-differentiation would be doubly detrimental. Differentiation between waking and dreaming is achieved through neuromodulation. During dreaming, without external sensory data and with mesolimbic dopaminergic input, hyper-cholinergic input almost totally suppresses the aminergic system. During waking, with sensory gates open, aminergic modulation inhibits cholinergic and mesocortical dopaminergic suppresses mesolimbic. These neuromodulatory systems are reciprocally interactive and self-organizing. As a consequence of neuromodulatory reciprocity, phenomenologically, the self and the world that appear during dreaming (...)
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  3.  32
    Crossing the invisible line: De-differentiation of wake, sleep and dreaming may engender both creative insight and psychopathology.Sue Llewellyn - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 46:127-147.
  4.  39
    Dream to Predict? REM Dreaming as Prospective Coding.Sue Llewellyn - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  5.  25
    Such stuff as REM and NREM dreams are made on? An elaboration.Sue Llewellyn - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):634-659.
    I argued that rapid eye movement dreaming is elaborative emotional encoding for episodic memories, sharing many features with the ancient art of memory. In this framework, during non–rapid eye movement, dream scenes enable junctions between episodic networks in the cortex and are retained by the hippocampus as indices for retrieval. The commentaries, which varied in tone from patent enthusiasm to edgy scepticism, fall into seven natural groups: debate over the contribution of the illustrative dream and disputes over the nature of (...)
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  6.  5
    Editorial: Cognition During Sleep: Hyperassociativity, Associativity and New Connections.Caroline L. Horton & Sue Llewellyn - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  7.  3
    “Never Land”: Where do imaginary worlds come from?Sue Llewellyn - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45:e287.
    We assume “Imaginary worlds” to be unreal and unfamiliar: high fantasy. I argue they are real and familiar to authors because they comprise memory elements, which blend experience, knowledge, beliefs and pre-occupations. These “bits and pieces” from memories can generate a world, which readers experience as pure imagination. I illustrate using J.M. Barrie's “Never Land” and J.R.R. Tolkien's “Middle-Earth.”.
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  8.  11
    Reconsolidation or re-association?Sue Llewellyn - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
    The target article argues memory reconsolidation demonstrates how therapeutic change occurs, grounding psychotherapy in brain science. However, consolidation has become an ambiguous term, a disadvantage applying also to its derivative – reconsolidation. The concept of re-association brings greater specificity and explanatory power to the possible brain correlates of therapeutic change.
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  9.  4
    Editorial: Fragmentation in Sleep and Mind: Linking Dissociative Symptoms, Sleep, and Memory.Dalena van Heugten - van der Kloet & Sue Llewellyn - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8:327459.
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