Results for 'Subject Darwall���S.'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  21
    Darwall on Welfare as Rational Care.Subject Darwall’S. - 2006 - Utilitas 18 (4).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  10
    Naturalizing Darwall's Second Person Standpoint.Carme Isern-Mas & Antoni Gomila - forthcoming - Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Scienc.
    In this paper, we take Darwall’s analytical project of the second-person standpoint as the starting point for a naturalistic project about our moral psychology. In his project, Darwall contends that our moral notions constitutively imply the perspective of second-personal interaction, i.e. the interaction of two mutually recognized agents who make and acknowledge claims on one another. This allows him to explain the distinctive purported authority of morality. Yet a naturalized interpretation of it has potential as an account of our moral (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  19
    Darwall's Kantian Argument.George Terzis - 1988 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):99 - 114.
    In Impartial Reason, Stephen Darwall presents an account of rational agency in which reasons to act are both motivational and normative in nature. On the one hand, they are facts about an action reflective awareness of which can genuinely influence preference and conduct. On the other hand, they are also capable of justifying action, of showing in an all-things-considered sense that a particular action is at least as choiceworthy as are alternatives to it. Furthermore, these two aspects of reasons to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Darwall on Rational Care.Joseph Raz - 2006 - Utilitas 18 (4):400-414.
    Stephen Darwall's understanding of what kind of life is a good life, good for the person whose life it is, belongs in the same family as, among others, Scanlon's and mine. It is a family of views about well-being which descends from Aristotle, and Darwall has much of interest to say about the good life, and particularly about Aristotle's views on the subject. Many of the observations central to his position seem to me cogent, and are shared by other (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5. Darwall on Welfare as Rational Care.James Griffin - 2006 - Utilitas 18 (4):427-433.
    Darwall's subject is a person's welfare – or to use his synonyms, a person's ‘good’, ‘interest’, ‘well-being’, ‘benefit’, or ‘eudaimonia’. Darwall is satisfied that there is a univocal notion here. I am unsure and shall come back to that question at the end.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6.  26
    On Darwall’s Case Against the Normal Justification Thesis.Ezequiel Horacio Monti - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):432-445.
    In a series of recent papers, Darwall has argued that Raz’s Normal Justification Thesis ought to be rejected. Here I shall argue that Darwall’s criticisms are unsuccessful. First, I argue that, contrary to what Darwall suggests, the NJT does not rely on an inference from the fact that B has a reason to treat A’s directives as protected reasons to the conclusion that A’s directives are protected reasons for B. Second, I argue that Darwall’s arguments to the effect that the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Darwall, S.-The British Moralists and the Internal'Ought': 1640 1740.T. Mautner - 1997 - Philosophical Books 38:102-103.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  89
    Comment on Stephen Darwall's The Second Person Standpoint: Morality, Respect and Accountability.Gideon Yaffe - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (1):246-252.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  75
    Précis of Welfare and Rational Care.S. Darwall - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 130 (3):579-584.
  10. Autonomy and the Second Person Within: A Commentary on Stephen Darwall’s The Second‐Person Standpoint.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2007 - Ethics 118 (1):8-23.
  11. Morality as Equal Accountability: Comments on Stephen Darwall’s The Second‐Person Standpoint.Gary Watson - 2007 - Ethics 118 (1):37-51.
  12. Rights and the Second-Person Standpoint: A Challenge to Darwall's Account.Kelly Heuer - manuscript
    Stephen Darwall’s The Second Person Standpoint is built around an analysis of the “second-person standpoint,” which he argues builds in a series of presuppositions which help shape (and perhaps even give content to) morality. This paper argues that there is a kind of paradox tied up in the two central claims at the heart of this project – that second-personal address directs one practically rather than epistemically by giving reasons for action one otherwise would not have had, and that all (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Deconstructing Welfare: Reflections on Stephen Darwall's Welfare and Rational Care.Susan Wolf - 2006 - Utilitas 18 (4):415-426.
    In his book Welfare and Rational Care, Stephen Darwall proposes to give an account of human welfare. Or rather, he offers two accounts, a metaethical and a normative account. The two accounts, he suggests, are somewhat supportive of each other though they are logically independent.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14.  13
    Logic of Subjection: Butler’s Symptomatic Reading of Hegel and Lacan on the Symbolic.Cláudio Alexandre S. Carvalho - 2008 - Revista Filosófica de Coimbra 17 (33):509-521.
  15.  81
    What is the Rational Care Theory of Welfare?: A Comment on Stephen Darwall’s Welfare and Rational Care.Fred Feldman - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 130 (3):585-601.
  16.  1
    From Affectivity to Subjectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited.Christian Lotz - 2007 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Christian Lotz shows in this book that Husserl's Phenomenology and its key concept--subjectivity--is based on a concrete anthropological structure, such as self-affection and the bodily experience of the other. The analysis of the sensual sphere and the lived Body forces Husserl to an ongoing correction of his strong methodological assumptions. Subjectivity turns out to be an ambivalent phenomenon, as the subject is unable to fully present itself to itself, and therefore is forced to allow for a fundamental non-transparency in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17.  7
    The Feminist Citizen-Subject: It’s Not About Choice, It’s About Changing It All.Alexander Kondakov - 2017 - Feminist Legal Studies 25 (1):47-69.
    This article ties together two different sources related to the Trial of Pussy Riot in Russia in 2012. On the one hand, I consider legal documents, such as court proceedings, police reports, and the sentence. On the other, I analyse a life-history interview with one of the accused, thus giving her a voice that is not mediated by juridical institutions within criminal law procedure. This allows an analysis of two different subject positions produced by these texts: a conformist citizen (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  16
    Critique of Subjectivity: Herder’s Foundation of the Human Sciences.Robert S. Leventhal - 1990 - In Kurt Mueller-Vollmer (ed.), Herder Today: Contributions From the International Herder Conference, November 5–8, 1987, Stanford, California. De Gruyter. pp. 173-189.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Beyond Subjectivity: Spinoza's Cognitivism of the Emotions.Gideon Segal - 2000 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (1):1 – 19.
    In what follows I try to show that Spinoza modelled his project of rational psychology, in some of its major respects, upon Descartes's metaphysics of matter. I argue further that, like Descartes, who paid for the rationalization of the science of matter the price of having to leave out of his description non-quantifiable qualities, so Spinoza left out of his psychology the non-rationalizable aspects of emotions, i.e. whatever in them could not be subsumed under common notions. He therefore was left (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20.  53
    What is the Rational Care Theory of Welfare? A Comment on Stephen Darwall's Welfare and Rational Care.Fred Feldman - 2006
    When we speak of a “good life” there are several different things we might mean. We might mean a morally good life. We might mean a life good for others, or good for the world in general. We might mean a life good in itself for the one who lives it. This last may also be described as the life high in individual welfare.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  7
    The Logic of Subjectivity: Kierkegaard's Philosophy of Religion.L. P. POJMAN - 1985 - Noûs 19 (4):633.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  22. Changing the Subject: Women's Discourses and Feminist Theology.Mary McClintock Fulkerson - 1994
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  23. Ego-Splitting and the Transcendental Subject. Kant’s Original Insight and Husserl’s Reappraisal.Marco Cavallaro - 2020 - In Iulian Apostolescu (ed.), The Subject(s) of Phenomenology. Rereading Husserl. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 107-133.
    In this paper, I contend that there are at least two essential traits that commonly define being an I: self-identity and self-consciousness. I argue that they bear quite an odd relation to each other in the sense that self-consciousness seems to jeopardize self-identity. My main concern is to elucidate this issue within the range of the transcendental philosophies of Immanuel Kant and Edmund Husserl. In the first section, I shall briefly consider Kant’s own rendition of the problem of the Egosplitting. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  24
    Outside the Subject: Levinas’s Jewish Perspective on Time.Alfred Tauber - 1998 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 20 (2/1):439-459.
  25.  32
    Becoming Subjective: Kierkegaard’s Existential Revolution.Michael J. Matthis - 2006 - Philosophy Today 50 (3):272-283.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  7
    Becoming Subjective: Kierkegaard’s Existential Revolution.Michael J. Matthis - 2006 - Philosophy Today 50 (3):272-283.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. The Poetic Subject: Foucault's Genealogy of Philosophy.Edward F. Mcgushin - 2002 - Dissertation, Boston College
    This dissertation explores the problematic of "care of the self" in the unpublished later work of Michel Foucault. In his major published works, Foucault studied how subjects are fabricated within relations of power and knowledge. He revealed that modern political power is a "bio-power." Its legitimacy derives from its capacity to nurture individual life. It does this by forging individuals whose bodies, capacities, pleasures, comforts, desires, etc., are intrinsically integrated into the state's productive force. One of the main techniques for (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  29
    The Logic of Subjectivity: Kierkegaard's Philosophy of Religion.Gordon D. Marino - 1985 - Review of Metaphysics 39 (2):372-374.
    The penultimate sentence of The Logic of Subjectivity reads, "Kierkegaard is not the sort of thinker who can easily be captured for all time in a series of syllogisms". This may be true, but let it never be said that the author of this book has not tried. In an appendix that really ought to have come first, Louis Pojman treats the how and why of Kierkegaard's method of indirect communication. With these essential pages always ahead and reservations scattered around, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. The Logic of Subjectivity: Kierkegaard’s Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW]Robert L. Perkins - 1985 - Faith and Philosophy 2 (2):209-211.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  29
    The Logic of Subjectivity: Kierkegaard’s Philosophy of Religion.Robert L. Perkins - 1985 - Faith and Philosophy 2 (2):209-211.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. After the Subject: Meillassoux's Ontology of 'What May Be'.Peter Gratton - 2009 - Pli (20):55-80.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  23
    The Logic of Subjectivity: Kierkegaard's Philosophy of Religion. By Louis P. Pojman.Richard J. Westley - 1987 - Modern Schoolman 64 (4):300-301.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Escape From the Subject : Heidegger's Das Man and Being-in-the-World.Jill Hargis - 2007 - In Mark Bevir, Jill Hargis & Sara Rushing (eds.), Histories of Postmodernism. Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Event and Subjectivity. Heidegger’s Phenomenology of Ereignis and its Relationship with Psychopathological Phenomena.Francesca Brencio & Anastasios Dimopoulos - manuscript
  35.  15
    The Logic of Subjectivity: Kierkegaard's Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW]John Donnelly - 1985 - Noûs 19 (4):633-641.
  36.  7
    Ego-Splitting and the Transcendental Subject. Kant’s Original Insight and Husserl’s Reappraisal.Marco Cavallaro - 2020 - In Iulian Apostolescu (ed.), The Subject of Phenomenology. Rereading Husserl. Springer. pp. 107-133.
    In this paper, I contend that there are at least two essential traits that commonly define being an I: self-identity and self-consciousness. I argue that they bear quite an odd relation to each other in the sense that self-consciousness seems to jeopardize self-identity. My main concern is to elucidate this issue within the range of the transcendental philosophies of Immanuel Kant and Edmund Husserl. In the first section, I shall briefly consider Kant’s own rendition of the problem of the Ego-splitting. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  27
    The Self-Overcoming Subject: Freud's Challenge to the Cartesian Ontology.Steven Fowler - 2004 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 35 (1):97-109.
    Two strands of enlightenment rationality—the mechanistic/deterministic and the self-overcoming—are distinguished, and the presence of the later in the work of Sigmund Freud is delineated. Beginning with Freud's investigations of hysteria, Freud's view of the person as a self-overcoming entity is spelled out in his theory of the unconscious and his theory of sexuality. It is argued that Freud provides, in the realm of empirical science, evidence that converges with the ontological conception of the person as a "being-in-the-world" developed by Heidegger (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  12
    Melancholia Becomes the Subject: Kristeva's Invisible ‘Thing’ and the Making of Culture.Lawrence D. Kritzman - 1991 - Paragraph 14 (2):144-150.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  20
    Embracing the Subject: Harsa's Play Within a Play. [REVIEW]David Shulman - 1997 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 25 (1):69-89.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  54
    Review: Darwall on Welfare and Rational Care. [REVIEW]Connie S. Rosati - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 130 (3):619 - 635.
  41. Normativity and Projection in Hobbes’s Leviathan.Stephen Darwall - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (3):313-347.
    A perennial problem in interpreting Hobbes’s moral and political thought in Leviathan has been to square the apparently irreducible normativity of central Hobbesian concepts and premises with his materialism and empiricism. Thus, Hobbes defines a “law of nature” as a “precept or general rule, found out by reason, by which a man is forbidden to do that which is destructive of his life” and the “right of nature” as “the liberty each man hath to use his own power, as he (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42.  15
    The Style of the Speaking Subject: Irigaray's Empirical Studies of Language Production.Marjorie Hass - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (1):64-89.
    I argue that Irigaray's linguistic research is not merely supplementary to her theoretical writing, but, in its depiction of sexed linguistic “styles,” illuminates Irigaray's call for a new syntax. I show the effect of this research on her analysis of the unconscious meaning of interrogative expressions. 1 address the question of Irigaray's standing as a social scientist and argue that attention to her method reveals her positive program in this domain.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  43.  11
    What Does It Mean to Be a ‘Subject’? Malabou’s Plasticity and Going Beyond the Question of the Inhuman, Posthuman, and Nonhuman.Sevket Benhur Oral - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (10):998-1010.
    What it means to be human is inherently incomplete or in a state of permanent mutability. This is excellent for it opens the way to the questions of the inhuman, posthuman, and nonhuman to take center stage in the analysis of what it means to be a subject, which is a core question for education. The question of the inhuman at the core of the human is brought into focus in the work of the Slovenian School of Psychoanalysis, whose (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  20
    Nature and Subjectivity: Fichte’s Role in the Pippin/McDowell Debate in the Light of His Neo-Kantian Reception.Peter Dews - 2010 - Fichte-Studien 35:227-242.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  15
    Darwall on Welfare and Rational Care.Connie S. Rosati - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 130 (3):619-635.
  46.  7
    Nature and Subjectivity: Fichte’s Role in the Pippin/McDowell Debate in the Light of His Neo-Kantian Reception.Peter Dews - 2010 - Fichte-Studien 35:227-242.
  47.  51
    The Style of the Speaking Subject: Irigaray's Empirical Studies of Language Production.Marjorie Hass - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (1):64-89.
    : I argue that Irigaray's linguistic research is not merely supplementary to her theoretical writing, but, in its depiction of sexed linguistic "styles," illuminates Irigaray's call for a new syntax. I show the effect of this research on her analysis of the unconscious meaning of interrogative expressions. I address the question of Irigaray's standing as a social scientist and argue that attention to her method reveals her positive program in this domain.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  48. Sympathetic Liberalism: Recent Work on Adam Smith.Stephen Darwall - 1999 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (2):139-164.
    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http: //www.jstor.org/about/terms. html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  49.  18
    Human Morality's Authority.Review author[S.]: Stephen Darwall - 1995 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (4):941-948.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  1
    Outside the Subject: Levinas’s Jewish Perspective on Time.Alfred Tauber - 1998 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 20 (2/1):439-459.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000