Results for 'Stoicism'

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  1.  60
    Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations.Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.) - 2004 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Stoicism is now widely recognised as one of the most important philosophical schools of ancient Greece and Rome. But how did it influence Western thought after Greek and Roman antiquity? The question is a difficult one to answer because the most important Stoic texts have been lost since the end of the classical period, though not before early Christian thinkers had borrowed their ideas and applied them to discussions ranging from dialectic to moral theology. Later philosophers became familiar with (...)
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  2.  97
    Stoicism.Sellars John - 2017 - Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy.
    An overview of Stoicism in the Renaissance, c. 1350 to c. 1650.
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  3. Stoicism.Dirk Baltzly - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stoicism was one of the new philosophical movements of the Hellenistic period. The name derives from the porch (stoa poikilê) in the Agora at Athens decorated with mural paintings, where the members of the school congregated, and their lectures were held. Unlike ‘epicurean,’ the sense of the English adjective ‘stoical’ is not utterly misleading with regard to its philosophical origins. The Stoics did, in fact, hold that emotions like fear or envy (or impassioned sexual attachments, or passionate love of (...)
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  4.  9
    From Stoicism to Platonism: The Development of Philosophy, 100 Bce–100 Ce.Troels Engberg-Pedersen (ed.) - 2017 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    From Stoicism to Platonism describes the change in philosophy from around 100 BCE, when monistic Stoicism was the strongest dogmatic school in philosophy, to around 100 CE, when dualistic Platonism began to gain the upper hand - with huge consequences for all later Western philosophy and for Christianity. It is distinguished by querying traditional categories like 'eclecticism' and 'harmonization' as means of describing the period. Instead, it highlights different strategies of 'appropriation' of one school's doctrines by philosophers from (...)
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  5.  26
    Stoicism and its Telos.Robin Weiss - 2020 - Metaphilosophy 51 (2-3):335-354.
    This essay concerns the disputed nature of the telos in Stoicism and argues that Michel Foucault’s description of the Stoic telos plausibly constitutes an accurate characterization, despite the frequent criticism it has received and the fact that it apparently neglects the important role of nature or physics in Stoicism. To advance this claim, the essay draws upon a neglected set of observations made by Foucault in The Hermeneutics of the Subject, in which the telos is characterized in terms (...)
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  6. Stoicism (as Emotional Compression) Is Emotional Labor.Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò - 2020 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 6 (2).
    The criticism of “traditional,” “toxic,” or “patriarchal” masculinity in both academic and popular venues recognizes that there is some sense in which the character traits and tendencies that are associated with masculinity are structurally connected to oppressive, gendered social practices and patriarchal social structures. One important theme of criticism centers on the gender distribution of emotional labor, generally speaking, but this criticism is also particularly meaningful in the context of heterosexual romantic relationships. I begin with the premise that there is (...)
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  7.  20
    Stoicism and Roman Example: Seneca and Tacitus in Jacobean England.John H. M. Salmon - 1989 - Journal of the History of Ideas 50 (2):199-225.
  8. Stoicism at war: From Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius to James Stockdale.Konrad Banicki - 2015 - In Tadeusz Marian Ostrowski, Iwona Sikorska & Krzysztof Gerc (eds.), Resilience and Health in a Fast-Changing World. Jagiellonian University Press. pp. 47-58.
    The chapter is devoted to the analysis of ancient Stoic philosophy as a source of resilience for soldiers. At first, some historical cases are investigated, from a Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius to more recent instances from Vietnam and Iraq. Secondly, in turn, the Epictetus' distinction between the controllable and the uncontrollable is introduced with the focus on the prescription to assign value only to the former as the Stoic source of resilience. Finally, some further questions are briefly addressed including the (...)
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  9. Stoicism.Massimo Pigliucci - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stoicism Stoicism originated as a Hellenistic philosophy, founded in Athens by Zeno of Citium, c. 300 B.C.E. It was influenced by Socrates and the Cynics, and it engaged in vigorous debates with the Skeptics, the Academics, and the Epicureans. It moved to Rome where it flourished during the period of the Empire, … Continue reading Stoicism →.
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  10.  14
    Roman Stoicism.Edward Vernon Arnold - 1911 - Freeport, N.Y.,: Books for Libraries Press.
    _Roman Stoicism_, first published in 1911, offers an authoritative introduction to this fascinating chapter in the history of Western philosophy, which throughout the 20 th century has been rediscovered and rehabilitated among philosophers, theologians and intellectual historians. Stoicism played a significant part in Roman history via the public figures who were its adherents ; and, as it became more widely accepted, it assumed the features of a religion. The Stoic approach to physics, the universe, divine providence, ethics, law and (...)
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  11. Grotius, Stoicism and 'Oikeiosis'.Christopher Brooke - 2001 - Grotiana 29 (1):25-50.
    For thirty years now there has been considerable debate concerning the foundations of modern natural law theory, with Richard Tuck emphasising the role self-preservation plays in anchoring Grotius's system and his critics pointing to the contribution of a principle of sociability. With reference to recent contributions in the literature on Stoicism from Julia Annas, A. A. Long and Tad Brennan, I argue that Grotius's use of the outline of Stoic ethics from Book III of Cicero's De finibus is crucial (...)
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  12. Scepticism, Stoicism and Subjectivity: Reappraising Montaigne's Influence on Descartes.Jesús Navarro - 2010 - Contrastes: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 15 (1-2):243-260.
    According to the standard view, Montaigne’s Pyrrhonian doubts would be in the origin of Descartes’ radical Sceptical challenges and his cogito argument. Although this paper does not deny this influence, its aim is to reconsider it from a different perspective, by acknowledging that it was not Montaigne’s Scepticism, but his Stoicism, which played the decisive role in the birth of the modern internalist conception of subjectivity. Cartesian need for certitude is to be better understood as an effect of the (...)
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  13.  17
    Stoicism Today Selected Essays volume 3.Gregory B. Sadler & Leah Goldrick (eds.) - 2021 - Independently published.
    Stoicism, a philosophy and set of practices developed in ancient times, commands ever-growing interest. Its present day, students, practitioners, teachers, and scholars adapt it to the challenges of modern life. This third volume brings together fifty pieces previously published in the Stoicism Today blog, ranging from personal essays to conference presentations, from bits of practical advice to history and interpretation, from polemics to symposia grappling with controversies, key issues, and central concepts. There is something for everyone in this (...)
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  14.  52
    Stoicism in Descartes, Pascal, and Spinoza: Examining Neostoicism’s Influence in the Seventeenth Century.Daniel Collette - unknown
    My dissertation focuses on the moral philosophy of Descartes, Pascal, and Spinoza in the context of the revival of Stoicism within the seventeenth century. There are many misinterpretations about early modern ethical theories due to a lack of proper awareness of Stoicism in the early modern period. My project rectifies this by highlighting understated Stoic themes in these early modern texts that offer new clarity to their morality. Although these three philosophers hold very different metaphysical commitments, each embraces (...)
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  15.  33
    Stoicism unbound: Cicero’s Academica in Toland’s Pantheisticon.Ian Leask - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):223-243.
    This article shows how and why John Toland’s Pantheisticon presents a version of Stoicism that locates Stoic ethics in terms of its ‘original’, naturalistic, foundation and devoid of any reconciliation with Christianity. As the article demonstrates, Toland’s account – based on Cicero’s Academica – stands opposed to the Christianized version of Stoicism that had dominated so much seventeenth-century discourse: in effect, Toland restores the materialism that was incompatible with neo-Stoicism. Furthermore, the article also suggests that this ‘restoration’ (...)
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  16. Nietzsche contra Stoicism: Naturalism and Value, Suffering and Amor Fati.James A. Mollison - 2019 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 62 (1):93-115.
    Nietzsche criticizes Stoicism for overstating the significance of its ethical ideal of rational self-sufficiency and for undervaluing pain and passion when pursuing an unconditional acceptance of fate. Apparent affinities between Stoicism and Nietzsche’s philosophy, especially his celebration of self-mastery and his pursuit of amor fati, lead some scholars to conclude that Nietzsche cannot advance these criticisms without contradicting himself. In this article, I narrow the target and scope of Nietzsche’s complaints against Stoicism before showing how they follow (...)
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  17.  55
    Stoicism and Modern Virtue Ethics.Christopher Gill - 2021 - In Christoph Halbig & Felix Timmermann (eds.), Handbuch Tugend Und Tugendethik. Wiesbaden: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. pp. 165-176.
    This chapter discusses distinctive features of Stoic ethical thought and their potential contribution to modern moral theory, especially virtue ethics. These features include Stoic ideas on the virtue-happiness relationship, theory of value, ethics and nature, ethical development and relationships to other people. The main claim is that, on these topics, Stoicism can contribute to modern virtue ethics more effectively than Aristotle, despite Aristotle’s well-known role as a stimulus for modern virtue ethics.
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  18.  31
    Political Correctness between Wise Stoicism and Violent Hypocrisy.Lorenzo Magnani - 2016 - Philosophies 1 (3):261--274.
    This article aims at commenting in a novel way on the concept of political correctness, by showing that, even if adopting a politically-correct behavior aims at promoting a precise moral outcome, violence can be still perpetrated, despite good intentions. To afford in a novel way the problem of political correctness, I will adopt a theoretical strategy that adheres to moral stoicism, the problem of “silence”, the “fascist state of the mind” and the concept of “overmorality”, which I have introduced (...)
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  19.  13
    Stoicism and its Telos.Robin Weiss - 2021 - In James M. Ambury, Tushar Irani & Kathleen Wallace (eds.), Philosophy as a way of life: historical, contemporary, and pedagogical perspectives. Malden, MA: Wiley. pp. 173–192.
    This essay concerns the disputed nature of the telos in Stoicism and argues that Michel Foucault’s description of the Stoic telos plausibly constitutes an accurate characterization, despite the frequent criticism it has received and the fact that it apparently neglects the important role of nature or physics in Stoicism. To advance this claim, the essay draws upon a neglected set of observations made by Foucault in The Hermeneutics of the Subject, in which the telos is characterized in terms (...)
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  20. Stoicism & emotion.Margaret Graver - 2007 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Stoicism and Emotion shows that they did not simply advocate an across-the-board suppression of feeling, as stoicism implies in today’s English, but instead conducted a searching examination of these powerful psychological responses, seeking to understand what attitude toward (...)
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  21. Midwest Stoicism, Agrarianism, and Environmental Virtue Ethics: Interdisciplinary Approaches.William O. Stephens - 2022 - In Ian Smith & Matt Ferkany (eds.), Environmental Ethics in the Midwest: Interdisciplinary Approaches. Michigan State University Press. pp. 1-42.
    First, the thorny problem of locating the Midwest is treated. Second, the ancient Stoics’ understanding of nature is proposed as a fertile field of ecological wisdom. The significance of nature in Stoicism is explained. Stoic philosophers (big-S Stoics) are distinguished from stoical non-philosophers (small-s stoics). Nature’s lessons for living a good Stoic life are drawn. Are such lessons too theoretical to provide practical guidance? This worry is addressed by examining the examples of Cincinnatus and Cato the Elder—ancient Romans lauded (...)
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  22. Stoicism.Author unknown - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  23.  24
    The influence of classical Stoicism on Walt Whitman’s thought and work.Mahendra Chitrarasu & Lisa Hill - 2024 - History of European Ideas 50 (2):249-265.
    Although scholars have long recognized that classical Stoicism affected Walt Whitman’s work, a full account of the extent of this debt has yet to be produced. Although he drew inspiration from many sources, we argue that Whitman’s “spinal ideas”—the ontological, moral, metaphysical and political threads of order in his thinking—are most consistently Stoic in origin. We do so by examining Whitman’s poetry, prose, correspondence, manuscripts, notebooks, and autobiography in the context of the primary and secondary Stoic material with which (...)
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  24. Stoicism: A Very Short Introduction.Brad Inwood - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Stoicism is two things: a long past philosophical school of ancient Greece and Rome, and an enduring philosophical movement that still inspires people in the twenty-first century to re-think and re-organize their lives in order to achieve personal satisfaction. Brad Inwood presents the long history that connects these.
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  25.  26
    Introduction: Stoicism in Modern German Philosophy.Kurt W. Lampe & Andrew Benjamin - 2020 - In Kurt Lampe & Andrew E. Benjamin (eds.), German Stoicisms: From Hegel to Sloterdijk. New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Though this chapter is co-authored, I was responsible for eight of its nine sections. Rather than foreshadowing the chapters to come in this edited volume, I have attempted to synthesize and supplement them in order to present an initial picture of the significance of Stoicism for German philosophy roughly since the late 19th century. With the exception of Friedrich Nietzsche, this vast field of Stoic reception has received almost no attention before. Particularly noteworthy elements in this chapter include sections (...)
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  26.  35
    Kristeva, Stoicism, and the "True Life of Interpretations".Kurt Lampe - 2016 - Substance 45 (1):22-43.
    The repertory of theories, practices, and stories associated with Greek and Roman Stoicism fills a significant compartment in the Western philosophical archive, the meaning and value of which are ceaselessly reconfigured by each generation’s archivists. In the recent decades, it is not only specialists who have browsed, rearranged, and relabeled these shelves; following Foucault’s Hermeneutics of the Subject as well as a powerful synergy between Anglophone scholars and cognitive-behavioral therapists, there is now a wave of enthusiasm, inquiry, and experimentation.1 (...)
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  27.  46
    The art of retrieval: Stoicism?C. Kavin Rowe - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):706-719.
    ABSTRACTThis essay argues that retrieving insights from the ancient Stoic philosophers for Christian ethics is much more difficult than is often assumed and, further, that the “ethics of retrieval” is itself something worth prolonged reflection. The central problem is that in their ancient sense both Christianity and Stoicism are practically dense patterns of reasoning and mutually incompatible forms of life. Coming to see this clearly requires the realization that the encounter between Stoicism and Christianity is a conflict of (...)
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  28. Stoicism in Berkeley's Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2011 - In Timo Airaksinen & Bertil Belfrage (eds.), Berkeley's lasting legacy: 300 years later. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 121-34.
    Commentators have not said much regarding Berkeley and Stoicism. Even when they do, they generally limit their remarks to Berkeley’s Siris (1744) where he invokes characteristically Stoic themes about the World Soul, “seminal reasons,” and the animating fire of the universe. The Stoic heritage of other Berkeleian doctrines (e.g., about mind or the semiotic character of nature) is seldom recognized, and when it is, little is made of it in explaining his other doctrines (e.g., immaterialism). None of this is (...)
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  29. Stoicism: The Education Of Man.Robert R. Sherman - 1973 - Journal of Thought 8 (3):215-23.
  30.  18
    Stoicism, Evil, and the Possibility of Morality.Claudia Card - 2018-04-18 - In Criticism and Compassion. Oxford, UK: Wiley. pp. 31–39.
    Martha Nussbaum's work on attitudes toward fortune helps the author explore limits of ethical ideals that give prominence to resisting evil or that are motivated by desires to resist, reduce, prevent, and alleviate evils. Utilitarianism is one ethic so motivated. Kant's reduction of virtues to the sense of duty and with that strain of his thought that regards emotions primarily as stumbling blocks to virtue. It may explain his early paradoxical advice concerning friendship, which he finds consists at its best (...)
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  31. The stoicism of the New Academy.Pierre Couissin - 1983 - In Myles Burnyeat (ed.), The Skeptical Tradition. University of California Press. pp. 31--63.
     
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  32.  15
    Stoic Minimalism: ‘Just Enough Stoicism’ for Modern Practitioners.Chuck Chakrapani - forthcoming - Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences.
    Chuck Chakrapani ABSTRACT: Stoic Minimalism may be described as ‘just enough Stoicism.’ Just enough for what? Just enough to lead the good life. Just enough to cope with the stress of modern life. Just enough to not be rattled by the constant changes that characterize the times we live in. Just enough to be resilient ….
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  33.  14
    Stoicism on the Best Regime.Francis Edward Devine - 1970 - Journal of the History of Ideas 31 (3):323.
  34. Shaftesbury, Stoicism, and Philosophy as a Way of Life.John Sellars - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):395-408.
    This paper examines Shaftesbury’s reflections on the nature of philosophy in his Askêmata notebooks, which draw heavily on the Roman Stoics Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. In what follows, I introduce the notebooks, outline Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy therein, compare it with his discussions of the nature of philosophy in his published works, and conclude by suggesting that Pierre Hadot’s conception of ‘philosophy as a way of life’ offers a helpful framework for thinking about Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy.
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  35.  92
    Stoicism, Evil, and the Possibility of Morality.Claudia Card - 1998 - Metaphilosophy 29 (4):245-253.
    Martha Nussbaum's work has been characterized by a sustained critique of Stoic ethics, insofar as that ethics denies the validity and importance of our valuing things that elude our control. This essay explores the idea that the very possibility of morality, understood as social or interpersonal ethics, presupposes that we do value such things. If my argument is right, Stoic ethics is unable to recognize the validity of morality (so understood) but can at most acknowledge duties to oneself. A further (...)
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  36.  6
    Marrying Stoicism with Platonism? Pseudo-Plutarch's Use of the Circe Episode.Mikolaj Domaradzki - 2020 - American Journal of Philology 141 (2):211-239.
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  37. Between stoicism and platonism-the concept of philosophy and the ultimate aim of man in the works of seneca-the-younger.M. Natali - 1994 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 86 (3):427-447.
  38. Stoicism.Gisela Striker - 1992 - In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Ethics. New York: Garland Publishing.
  39. Stoicism, Feminism and Autonomy.Scott Aikin & Emily McGill-Rutherford - 2014 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 1 (1):9-22.
    The ancient Stoics had an uneven track record with regard to women’s standing. On the one hand, they recognized women as fully capable of rationality and virtue. On the other hand, they continued to hold that women’s roles were in the home. These views are consistent, given Stoic value theory, but are unacceptable on liberal feminist grounds. Stoic value theory, given different emphasis on the ethical role of choice, is shown to be capable of satisfying the liberal feminist requirement that (...)
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  40.  23
    Stoicism.Phillip Mitsis - 2003 - In Christopher Shields (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ancient Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 253–267.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introductions Stoic Approach to Philosophy: Importance of Systematicity Stoic Sources Stoic Ethics Stoic Psychology and Physics Stoic Logic Conclusion Notes References and Recommended Reading.
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  41.  27
    Studies in Stoicism.P. A. Brunt & Michael Crawford - 2013 - Oxford: Oxford University Press. Edited by Michael H. Crawford, Miriam T. Griffin & Alison Samuels.
    Studies in Stoicism contains six unpublished and seven republished essays, the latter incorporating additions and changes which Brunt wished to be made. The papers have been integrated and arranged in chronological order by subject matter, with an accessible lecture to the Oxford Philological Society serving as Brunt's own introduction.
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  42. Stoicism and Food.William O. Stephens - 2018 - Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics.
    The ancient Stoics believed that virtue is the only true good and as such both necessary and sufficient for happiness. Accordingly, they classified food as among the things that are neither good nor bad but "indifferent." These "indifferents" included health, illness, wealth, poverty, good and bad reputation, life, death, pleasure, and pain. How one deals with having or lacking these things reflects one’s virtue or vice and thus determines one’s happiness or misery. So, while the Stoics held that food in (...)
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  43.  9
    Stoicism.Christopher Gill - 2003 - In Randall Curren (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Education. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 25–32.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Context and History Stoic Theory as a System Ethics: Values and Development Knowing the Good Practical Ethics and Conventional Thought.
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  44.  49
    4. Stoicism as a Way of Life.John M. Cooper - 2012 - In John Madison Cooper (ed.), Pursuits of Wisdom: Six Ways of Life in Ancient Philosophy From Socrates to Plotinus. Princeton University Press. pp. 144-225.
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  45.  65
    Stoicism and emotion (review).James Warren - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 633-634.
    The Stoics’ account of the emotions may seem a barren and austere landscape. Fortunately, this picture is increasingly being challenged and Margaret Graver’s book is an excellent and eloquent addition to that general approach. The book has many virtues. In addition to a beautifully clear and uncluttered style, it offers a careful and balanced account of the Stoic view of the emotions which pays all due attention to the Stoics’ accounts of psychology in general , education and character development, and (...)
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  46.  24
    Stoicism and Emotion.Maud W. Gleason - 2009 - Common Knowledge 15 (2):214-215.
  47. Beyond Stoicism Plutarch's Parallel Lives and Montaigne's Search For a New Noble Ethos.Cara Welch - 2007 - In Corinne Noirot-Maguire & Valérie M. Dionne (eds.), Revelations of character: ethos, rhetoric, and moral philosophy in Montaigne. Newcastle, U.K.: Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 99.
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  48.  44
    Adam Smith, Stoicism and religion in the 18th century.P. H. Clarke - 2000 - History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):49-72.
    This article explores the influence of Stoicism and religion on Adam Smith. While other commentators have argued either that the main influence on Smith was Stoicism or that it was religion, the two influences have not been explicitly linked. In this article I attempt to make such a link, arguing that Smith can be seen as belonging to the strand of Christian Stoicism chiefly associated with his teacher, Francis Hutcheson. Finally, some comments are made about the implications (...)
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  49. Stoicism Today.Jean-Baptiste Gourinat - 2009 - Iris. European Journal of Philosophy and Public Debate 1 (2):497-511.
    The aim of this paper is to elucidate the meaning of Stoicism today. First, it roughly sketches Stoicism as a philosophical system, namely its logic, physics and ethics. It argues that many aspects of its logic and physics are outdated but that the general Stoic approach to these disciplines may still be relevant to modern philosophers. Moreover, the more persuasive part of Stoicism is ethics: Stoic ethics is naturalistic and intellectualist. Stoics argue that virtue is the only (...)
     
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  50.  8
    Stoicism and Buddha's Happiness.Jinwoo Jeong - 2013 - 동서철학연구(Dong Seo Cheol Hak Yeon Gu; Studies in Philosophy East-West) 70:57-79.
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