Results for 'Stoicism'

844 found
Order:
See also
  1. Stoicism: A Very Short Introduction.Brad Inwood - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Stoicism is two things: a long past philosophical school of ancient Greece and Rome, and an enduring philosophical movement that still inspires people in the twenty-first century to re-think and re-organize their lives in order to achieve personal satisfaction. Brad Inwood presents the long history that connects these.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  54
    Stoicism.John Sellars - 2006 - Acumen Publishing.
    This book provides a lucid, comprehensive introduction to this great philosophical school.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  3.  70
    Stoicism (as Emotional Compression) Is Emotional Labor.Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò - 2020 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 6 (2).
    The criticism of “traditional,” “toxic,” or “patriarchal” masculinity in both academic and popular venues recognizes that there is some sense in which the character traits and tendencies that are associated with masculinity are structurally connected to oppressive, gendered social practices and patriarchal social structures. One important theme of criticism centers on the gender distribution of emotional labor, generally speaking, but this criticism is also particularly meaningful in the context of heterosexual romantic relationships. I begin with the premise that there is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4.  52
    Stoicism.Sellars John - 2017 - Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy.
    An overview of Stoicism in the Renaissance, c. 1350 to c. 1650.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5.  96
    Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations.Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.) - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Stoicism is now widely recognised as one of the most important philosophical schools of ancient Greece and Rome. But how did it influence Western thought after Greek and Roman antiquity? The question is a difficult one to answer because the most important Stoic texts have been lost since the end of the classical period, though not before early Christian thinkers had borrowed their ideas and applied them to discussions ranging from dialectic to moral theology. Later philosophers became familiar with (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6. Stoicism.Dirk Baltzly - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stoicism was one of the new philosophical movements of the Hellenistic period. The name derives from the porch (stoa poikilê) in the Agora at Athens decorated with mural paintings, where the members of the school congregated, and their lectures were held. Unlike ‘epicurean,’ the sense of the English adjective ‘stoical’ is not utterly misleading with regard to its philosophical origins. The Stoics did, in fact, hold that emotions like fear or envy (or impassioned sexual attachments, or passionate love of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  7. From Stoicism to Platonism: The Development of Philosophy, 100 Bce–100 Ce.Troels Engberg-Pedersen (ed.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    From Stoicism to Platonism describes the change in philosophy from around 100 BCE, when monistic Stoicism was the strongest dogmatic school in philosophy, to around 100 CE, when dualistic Platonism began to gain the upper hand - with huge consequences for all later Western philosophy and for Christianity. It is distinguished by querying traditional categories like 'eclecticism' and 'harmonization' as means of describing the period. Instead, it highlights different strategies of 'appropriation' of one school's doctrines by philosophers from (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. Roman Stoicism.Edward Arnold - 1911 - Freeport, N.Y., Books for Libraries Press.
    _Roman Stoicism_, first published in 1911, offers an authoritative introduction to this fascinating chapter in the history of Western philosophy, which throughout the 20 th century has been rediscovered and rehabilitated among philosophers, theologians and intellectual historians. Stoicism played a significant part in Roman history via the public figures who were its adherents ; and, as it became more widely accepted, it assumed the features of a religion. The Stoic approach to physics, the universe, divine providence, ethics, law and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9. Stoicism, Feminism and Autonomy.Scott Aikin & Emily McGill-Rutherford - 2014 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 1 (1):9-22.
    The ancient Stoics had an uneven track record with regard to women’s standing. On the one hand, they recognized women as fully capable of rationality and virtue. On the other hand, they continued to hold that women’s roles were in the home. These views are consistent, given Stoic value theory, but are unacceptable on liberal feminist grounds. Stoic value theory, given different emphasis on the ethical role of choice, is shown to be capable of satisfying the liberal feminist requirement that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  92
    Stoicism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Legacy of European Imperialism.Anthony Pagden - 2000 - Constellations 7 (1):3-22.
  11. Stoicism.Massimo Pigliucci - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stoicism Stoicism originated as a Hellenistic philosophy, founded in Athens by Zeno of Citium, c. 300 B.C.E. It was influenced by Socrates and the Cynics, and it engaged in vigorous debates with the Skeptics, the Academics, and the Epicureans. It moved to Rome where it flourished during the period of the Empire, … Continue reading Stoicism →.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12. Problems in Stoicism.A. A. Long (ed.) - 1971 - Athlone Press.
    The original publication was an important spur to the subsequent renewal of interest in the study of stoicism, and is here reprinted not only because literature on the subject is still scarce, but because it has continued to be heavily referred to long after it had gone out of print. The ten essays were presented at a seminar at the University of London. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  13. Stoicism in Berkeley's Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2011 - In Bertil Belfrage & Timo Airaksinen (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 121-34.
    Commentators have not said much regarding Berkeley and Stoicism. Even when they do, they generally limit their remarks to Berkeley’s Siris (1744) where he invokes characteristically Stoic themes about the World Soul, “seminal reasons,” and the animating fire of the universe. The Stoic heritage of other Berkeleian doctrines (e.g., about mind or the semiotic character of nature) is seldom recognized, and when it is, little is made of it in explaining his other doctrines (e.g., immaterialism). None of this is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment.Christian Maurer - 2016 - In John Sellars (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition. Routledge. pp. 254-269.
  15.  80
    Shaftesbury, Stoicism, and Philosophy as a Way of Life.John Sellars - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):395-408.
    This paper examines Shaftesbury’s reflections on the nature of philosophy in his Askêmata notebooks, which draw heavily on the Roman Stoics Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. In what follows, I introduce the notebooks, outline Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy therein, compare it with his discussions of the nature of philosophy in his published works, and conclude by suggesting that Pierre Hadot’s conception of ‘philosophy as a way of life’ offers a helpful framework for thinking about Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16. Scepticism, Stoicism and Subjectivity: Reappraising Montaigne's Influence on Descartes.Jesús Navarro - 2010 - Contrastes: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 15 (1-2):243-260.
    According to the standard view, Montaigne’s Pyrrhonian doubts would be in the origin of Descartes’ radical Sceptical challenges and his cogito argument. Although this paper does not deny this influence, its aim is to reconsider it from a different perspective, by acknowledging that it was not Montaigne’s Scepticism, but his Stoicism, which played the decisive role in the birth of the modern internalist conception of subjectivity. Cartesian need for certitude is to be better understood as an effect of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  21
    Hume’s Stoicism: Reflections on Happiness and the Value of Philosophy.Hsueh Qu - 2022 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 60 (1):79-96.
  18.  89
    Grotius, Stoicism and 'Oikeiosis'.Christopher Brooke - 2001 - Grotiana 29 (1):25-50.
    For thirty years now there has been considerable debate concerning the foundations of modern natural law theory, with Richard Tuck emphasising the role self-preservation plays in anchoring Grotius's system and his critics pointing to the contribution of a principle of sociability. With reference to recent contributions in the literature on Stoicism from Julia Annas, A. A. Long and Tad Brennan, I argue that Grotius's use of the outline of Stoic ethics from Book III of Cicero's De finibus is crucial (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  19.  9
    Stoicism and Modern Virtue Ethics.Christopher Gill - 2021 - In Christoph Halbig & Felix Timmermann (eds.), Handbuch Tugend Und Tugendethik. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. pp. 165-176.
    This chapter discusses distinctive features of Stoic ethical thought and their potential contribution to modern moral theory, especially virtue ethics. These features include Stoic ideas on the virtue-happiness relationship, theory of value, ethics and nature, ethical development and relationships to other people. The main claim is that, on these topics, Stoicism can contribute to modern virtue ethics more effectively than Aristotle, despite Aristotle’s well-known role as a stimulus for modern virtue ethics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Stoicism in the Philosophical Tradition: Spinoza, Lipsius, Butler.A. A. Long - 2003 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 365--92.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  21.  63
    Early Stoicism and Akrasia.Richard Joyce - 1995 - Phronesis 40 (3):315-335.
  22. Stoicism.St George William Joseph Stock - 1908 - Freeport, N.Y., Books for Libraries Press.
  23.  53
    Nietzsche Contra Stoicism: Naturalism and Value, Suffering and Amor Fati.James A. Mollison - 2019 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 62 (1):93-115.
    ABSTRACTNietzsche criticizes Stoicism for overstating the significance of its ethical ideal of rational self-sufficiency and for undervaluing pain and passion when pursuing an unconditional acceptance of fate. Apparent affinities between Stoicism and Nietzsche’s philosophy, especially his celebration of self-mastery and his pursuit of amor fati, lead some scholars to conclude that Nietzsche cannot advance these criticisms without contradicting himself. In this article, I narrow the target and scope of Nietzsche’s complaints against Stoicism before showing how they follow (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24. Stoicism & Emotion.Margaret R. Graver - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Stoicism and Emotion shows that they did not simply advocate an across-the-board suppression of feeling, as stoicism implies in today’s English, but instead conducted a searching examination of these powerful psychological responses, seeking to understand what attitude toward (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25.  36
    Stoicism in the Renaissance From Petrarch to Lipsius.Jill Kraye - 2001 - Grotiana 22 (1):21-45.
  26.  4
    Later Stoicism 155 Bc to Ad 200: An Introduction and Collection of Sources in Translation.Brad Inwood - 2022 - Cambridge University Press.
    Most modern readers of the Stoics think first of later authors such as Seneca, Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. Existing works like Long and Sedley's The Hellenistic Philosophers concentrate on the Stoics of the early school. This book focusses on the more influential later school, including key figures like Panaetius and Posidonius, and provides well-chosen selections from the full range of Stoic thinkers. It emphasizes their important work in logic, physics and cosmology as well as in ethics. Fresh translations and incisive (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  47
    Stoicism and its Influence.Robert Mark Wenley - 1963 - New York: Cooper Square Publishers.
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  56
    Stoicism and Emotion.David Konstan - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):472-477.
  29. Stoicism at War: From Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius to James Stockdale.Konrad Banicki - 2015 - In Tadeusz Marian Ostrowski, Iwona Sikorska & Krzysztof Gerc (eds.), Resilience and Health in a Fast-Changing World. Jagiellonian University Press. pp. 47-58.
    The chapter is devoted to the analysis of ancient Stoic philosophy as a source of resilience for soldiers. At first, some historical cases are investigated, from a Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius to more recent instances from Vietnam and Iraq. Secondly, in turn, the Epictetus' distinction between the controllable and the uncontrollable is introduced with the focus on the prescription to assign value only to the former as the Stoic source of resilience. Finally, some further questions are briefly addressed including the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  41
    Let It Go? Elsa, Stoicism, and the “Lazy Argument”.Brendan Shea - 2022 - AndPhilosophy.Com: The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series.
    Disney’s Frozen (2013) and Frozen 2 (2019) are among the highest-grossing films of all time (IMDb 2021) and are arguably among the most influential works of fantasy produced in the last decade in any medium. The films, based loosely on Hans Christensen Andersen’s “The Snow Queen” (Andersen 2014) focus on the adventures of the sisters Anna and Elsa as they, together with their companions, seek to safeguard their people both from external threats and (importantly) from Elsa’s inabilities to control her (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  10
    Introduction: Stoicism in Modern German Philosophy.Kurt W. Lampe & Andrew Benjamin - forthcoming - In Kurt Lampe & Andrew Benjamin (eds.), German Stoicisms: From Hegel to Sloterdijk.
    Though this chapter is co-authored, I was responsible for eight of its nine sections. Rather than foreshadowing the chapters to come in this edited volume, I have attempted to synthesize and supplement them in order to present an initial picture of the significance of Stoicism for German philosophy roughly since the late 19th century. With the exception of Friedrich Nietzsche, this vast field of Stoic reception has received almost no attention before. Particularly noteworthy elements in this chapter include sections (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  51
    God and Cosmos in Stoicism.Ricardo Salles (ed.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a collective study, in nine new essays, of the close connection between theology and cosmology in Stoic philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33. Stoicism and Epicureanism.Christopher Gill - 2009 - In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  34. The Stoicism of the New Academy.Pierre Couissin - 1983 - In Burnyeat (ed.), The Skeptical Tradition. pp. 31--63.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  35. Stoicism and Slavery in the Roman Empire.C. E. Manning - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 1518-1544.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  71
    Stoicism and Food.William O. Stephens - 2018 - Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  27
    Kristeva, Stoicism, and the "True Life of Interpretations".Kurt W. Lampe - 2016 - Substance 45 (1):22-43.
    The repertory of theories, practices, and stories associated with Greek and Roman Stoicism fills a significant compartment in the Western philosophical archive, the meaning and value of which are ceaselessly reconfigured by each generation’s archivists. In the recent decades, it is not only specialists who have browsed, rearranged, and relabeled these shelves; following Foucault’s Hermeneutics of the Subject as well as a powerful synergy between Anglophone scholars and cognitive-behavioral therapists, there is now a wave of enthusiasm, inquiry, and experimentation.1 (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Stoicism in the Stars: Yoda, the Emperor, and the Force.William Stephens - 2005 - In Kevin Decker & Jason Eberl (eds.), Star Wars and Philosophy. Chicago: Open Court Publishing. pp. 16-28.
    Stoic analysis of the characters of Yoda and the Emperor reveals the opposing logics of the Force. Yoda initially appears to be a jester, but shares with the Stoic wise man the virtues of timely action, patience, commitment, seriousness, calmness, peacefulness, caution, benevolence, joyful mirth, passivity, and wisdom. The logic of the Dark Side is: Anger leads to hatred. Hatred leads to aggressive mastery of others, which is true power, which is irresistibly desirable. The Emperor uses terror and cruelty to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  47
    Stoicism, Science and Divination.R. J. Hankinson - 1988 - Apeiron 21 (2):123 - 160.
  40. Refugees, Stoicism, and Cosmic Citizenship.William O. Stephens - 2020 - Pallas: Revue d'Etudes Antiques 112:289-307.
    The Roman imperial Stoics were familiar with exile. I argue that the Stoics’ view of being a refugee differed sharply from their view of what is owed to refugees. A Stoic adopts the perspective of a cosmopolitēs, a ‘citizen of the world’, a rational being everywhere at home in the universe. Virtue can be cultivated and practiced in any locale, so being a refugee is an ‘indifferent’ that poses no obstacle to happiness. But other people are our fellow cosmic citizens (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  12
    Stoicism and Roman Example: Seneca and Tacitus in Jacobean England.John H. M. Salmon - 1989 - Journal of the History of Ideas 50 (2):199-225.
  42.  24
    Stoicism’s Integration Problem and Epictetus’ Metaphors.Scott F. Aikin - 2013 - Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):185-193.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  77
    Stoicism, Evil, and the Possibility of Morality.Claudia Card - 1998 - Metaphilosophy 29 (4):245-253.
    Martha Nussbaum's work has been characterized by a sustained critique of Stoic ethics, insofar as that ethics denies the validity and importance of our valuing things that elude our control. This essay explores the idea that the very possibility of morality, understood as social or interpersonal ethics, presupposes that we do value such things. If my argument is right, Stoic ethics is unable to recognize the validity of morality (so understood) but can at most acknowledge duties to oneself. A further (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Stoicism as Anesthesia: Philosophy’s “Gentler Remedies” in Boethius’s Consolation.Matthew D. Walz - 2011 - International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (4):501-519.
    Boethius first identifies Philosophy in the 'Consolation' as his 'medica', his “healer” or “physician.” Over the course of the dialogue Philosophy exercises her medical art systematically. In the second book Philosophy first gives Boethius “gentler remedies” that are preparatory for the “sharper medicines” that she administers later. This article shows that, philosophically speaking, Philosophy’s “gentler remedies” amount to persuading Boethius toward Stoicism, which functions as an anesthetic for the more invasive philosophical surgery that she performs afterwards. Seeing this, however, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  15
    Stoicism Unbound: Cicero’s Academica in Toland’s Pantheisticon.Ian Leask - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):223-243.
    This article shows how and why John Toland’s Pantheisticon presents a version of Stoicism that locates Stoic ethics in terms of its ‘original’, naturalistic, foundation and devoid of any reconciliation with Christianity. As the article demonstrates, Toland’s account – based on Cicero’s Academica – stands opposed to the Christianized version of Stoicism that had dominated so much seventeenth-century discourse: in effect, Toland restores the materialism that was incompatible with neo-Stoicism. Furthermore, the article also suggests that this ‘restoration’ (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  26
    Why Stoicism Won the Romans.Frank J. Moellering - 1928 - Modern Schoolman 4 (4):54-55.
    Why was it that, with belief in the old gods discredited and scepticism spreading widely, Stoic ideals attracted the attention and ultimately won the adhesion of the most thoughtful Romans?Mr. Moellering traces this, first, to Stoicism's appeal to the Roman religious sense, and, secondly, to the Roman character itself. Aeneas, he believes, is the very embodiment of Roman Stoicism.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Stoicism Today.Jean-Baptiste Gourinat - 2009 - Iris. European Journal of Philosophy and Public Debate 1 (2):497-511.
    The aim of this paper is to elucidate the meaning of Stoicism today. First, it roughly sketches Stoicism as a philosophical system, namely its logic, physics and ethics. It argues that many aspects of its logic and physics are outdated but that the general Stoic approach to these disciplines may still be relevant to modern philosophers. Moreover, the more persuasive part of Stoicism is ethics: Stoic ethics is naturalistic and intellectualist. Stoics argue that virtue is the only (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  51
    The Neo-Stoicism of Radical Environmentalism.Jim Cheney - 1989 - Environmental Ethics 11 (4):293-325.
    Feminist analysis has eonvineed me that certain tendencies within that form of radical environmentalism known as deep ecology-with its supposed rejection of the Western ethical tradition and its adoption of what looks to be a feminist attitude toward the environment and our relationship to nature-constitute one more chapter in the story of Western alienation from nature. In this paper I deepen my critique of these tendencies toward alienation within deep ecology by historicizing my critique in the light of a development (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  49.  28
    The Stoicism of Epictetus: Twentieth Century Perspectives.Jackson Hershbell - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 2148-2163.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50.  30
    Stoicism in Descartes, Pascal, and Spinoza: Examining Neostoicism’s Influence in the Seventeenth Century.Daniel Collette - unknown
    My dissertation focuses on the moral philosophy of Descartes, Pascal, and Spinoza in the context of the revival of Stoicism within the seventeenth century. There are many misinterpretations about early modern ethical theories due to a lack of proper awareness of Stoicism in the early modern period. My project rectifies this by highlighting understated Stoic themes in these early modern texts that offer new clarity to their morality. Although these three philosophers hold very different metaphysical commitments, each embraces (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 844