16 found
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  1.  44
    Self-Recognition.James R. Anderson, Gordon G. Gallup & Steven M. Platek - 2011 - In Shaun Gallagher (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Self. Oxford University Press.
    This article focuses on mirror self-recognition, the ability to recognize one's own image in a mirror. It presents the result of the first experiment on mirror self-recognition which showed that chimpanzees are able to learn that the chimps they see in the mirror are not other chimps, but themselves, as evidenced by self-directed behaviour. It reviews evidence for neural network for self-recognition and self-other differentiation and cites evidence that frontal cortex and cortical midline structures are implicated in self-recognition tasks. It (...)
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  2.  30
    The Nature of Visual Self-Recognition Revisited.Gordon G. Gallup, Steven M. Platek & Kristina N. Spaulding - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (2):57-58.
  3.  69
    An Evolutionary Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective on Human Self-Awareness and Theory of Mind.Farah Focquaert, Johan Braeckman & Steven M. Platek - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):47 – 68.
    The evolutionary claim that the function of self-awareness lies, at least in part, in the benefits of theory of mind (TOM) regained attention in light of current findings in cognitive neuroscience, including mirror neuron research. Although certain non-human primates most likely possess mirror self-recognition skills, we claim that they lack the introspective abilities that are crucial for human-like TOM. Primate research on TOM skills such as emotional recognition, seeing versus knowing and ignorance versus knowing are discussed. Based upon current findings (...)
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  4.  26
    The Nature of Visual Self-Recognition Revisited.Gordon G. Gallup Jr, Steven M. Platek & Kristina L. Spaulding - forthcoming - Trends in Cognitive Sciences.
  5. An Integrated and Intermodal Self: Cross Modal Self-Recognition.Steven M. Platek, Jaime W. Thomson & Gordon G. Gallup - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):197-210.
  6.  76
    Cognitive Empathy Presupposes Self-Awareness: Evidence From Phylogeny, Ontogeny, Neuropsychology, and Mental Illness.Gordon G. Gallup & Steven M. Platek - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):36-37.
    We argue that cognitive empathy and other instances of mental state attribution are a byproduct of self-awareness. Evidence is brought to bear on this proposition from comparative psychology, early child development, neuropsychology, and abnormal behavior.
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  7.  58
    No Blind Schizophrenics: Are NMDA-Receptor Dynamics Involved?Glenn S. Sanders, Steven M. Platek & Gordon G. Gallup - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):103-104.
    Numerous searches have failed to identify a single co-occurrence of total blindness and schizophrenia. Evidence that blindness causes loss of certain NMDA-receptor functions is balanced by reports of compensatory gains. Connections between visual and anterior cingulate NMDA-receptor systems may help to explain how blindness could protect against schizophrenia.
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  8.  82
    Executive Function and Language Deficits Associated with Aggressive-Sadistic Personality.Anthony C. Ruocco & Steven M. Platek - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):239-240.
    Aggressive-sadistic personality disorder (SPD) involves derivation of pleasure from another's physical or emotional suffering, or from control and domination of others. Findings from a head-injured sample indicate that SPD traits are associated with neuropsychological deficits in executive function and language, suggesting difficulties in frontal-lobe-mediated self-regulation of aggressive and emotional impulses. Implications for rehabilitation of aggressive offenders are discussed.
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  9. Kielan Yarrow, Patrick Haggard, and John C. Rothwell. Action, Arousal, and Subjective Time.David A. Gallo, John G. Seamon, L. Andrew Coward, Ron Sun, Jing Zhu, John F. Kihlstrom, Steven M. Platek, Jaime W. Thomson, Gordon G. Gallup Jr & Jeroen G. W. Raaijmakers - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12:783.
     
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  10. Book Reviews-Female Infidelity and Paternal Uncertainty: Evolutionary Perspectives in Mel Anti-Cuckoldry Tactics.Steven M. Platek, Todd K. Shackelford & Francis T. McAndrew - 2006 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (3):367.
     
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  11.  53
    Uncertain What Uncertainty Monitoring Monitors.Victoria M. Wilkins, LeeAnn Cardaciotto & Steven M. Platek - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):356-357.
    Smith et al. present a model that they suggest may clarify aspects of the phylogenetic distribution of metacognition, based on observation of what they call uncertainty monitoring. Although they suggest that their model is supported by data collected using monkeys and dolphins, their interpretation that nonhuman animal behaviors parallel thought processes in humans may be unwarranted. The model presented by Smith et al. is inconsistent with current theories and empirical findings on the comparative aspects of metacognition. We present three oversights (...)
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  12.  26
    The Anatomical and Evolutionary Relationship Between Self-Awareness and Theory of Mind.Kevin Guise, Karen Kelly, Jennifer Romanowski, Kai Vogeley, Steven M. Platek, Elizabeth Murray & Julian Paul Keenan - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (2):132-142.
    Although theories that examine direct links between behavior and brain remain incomplete, it is known that brain expansion significantly correlates with caloric and oxygen demands. Therefore, one of the principles governing evolutionary cognitive neuroscience is that cognitive abilities that require significant brain function (and/or structural support) must be accompanied by significant fitness benefit to offset the increased metabolic demands. One such capacity is self-awareness (SA), which (1) is found only in the greater apes and (2) remains unclear in terms of (...)
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  13.  13
    Merging the “New Sciences of the Mind”.Steven M. Platek - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (2):85-87.
  14.  25
    Self-Awareness, Social Intelligence and Schizophrenia.Gordon G. Gallup Jr, James R. Anderson & Steven M. Platek - 2003 - In Tilo Kircher & Anthony David (eds.), The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press. pp. 147-165.
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  15.  14
    Syntax: An Evolutionary Stepchild.Danielle Dilkes & Steven M. Platek - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):511-512.
    Dean Falk has strategically explored “mother-infant gestural and vocal interactions . . . in chimpanzees and humans” in order to offer hypotheses “about the evolutionary underpinnings that preceded the first glimmerings of language.” Though she offers compelling evidence for many interesting hypotheses as to the epigenesis of language, other possibilities have yet to be explored. Here we explore the role of gestural communication among deaf signers and the neural correlates associated with this type of communication.
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  16.  27
    A Self Frozen in Time and Space: Catatonia as a Kinesthetic Analog to Mirrored Self-Misidentification.Steven M. Platek & Gordon G. Gallup - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):589-590.
    Aspects of Northoff's argument lend themselves to the ongoing investigation of localizing the self in the brain. Recent data from the fields of neuropsychology and cognitive neuroscience provide evidence that the right hemisphere is a candidate for localization of self. The data on catatonia further that proposition and add insight into the continuing investigation of self in the brain across sensory and motor domains.
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