Results for 'Steven D. Johnson'

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  1.  64
    Luck Attributions and Cognitive Bias.Steven D. Hales & Jennifer Adrienne Johnson - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (4-5):509-528.
    Philosophers have developed three theories of luck: the probability theory, the modal theory, and the control theory. To help assess these theories, we conducted an empirical investigation of luck attributions. We created eight putative luck scenarios and framed each in either a positive or a negative light. Furthermore, we placed the critical luck event at the beginning, middle, or end of the scenario to see if the location of the event influenced luck attributions. We found that attributions of luckiness were (...)
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  2.  13
    Dispositional Optimism and Luck Attributions: Implications for Philosophical Theories of Luck.Steven D. Hales & Jennifer Adrienne Johnson - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (7):1027-1045.
    ABSTRACTWe conducted two studies to determine whether there is a relationship between dispositional optimism and the attribution of good or bad luck to ambiguous luck scenarios. Study 1 presented five scenarios that contained both a lucky and an unlucky component, thereby making them ambiguous in regard to being an overall case of good or bad luck. Participants rated each scenario in toto on a four-point Likert scale and then completed an optimism questionnaire. The results showed a significant correlation between optimism (...)
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  3.  14
    Toward the Rigorous Use of Diagrams in Reasoning About Hardware.Steven D. Johnson, Jon Barwise & Gerard Allwein - 1996 - In Gerard Allwein & Jon Barwise (eds.), Logical Reasoning with Diagrams. Oxford University Press.
  4.  5
    Frontal Eye Fields: Inhibition Through Competition.Steven D. Forman, Jonathan D. Cohen & Mark H. Johnson - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):578-578.
  5.  2
    Photonic Crystals: Molding the Flow of Light.John D. Joannopoulos, Steven G. Johnson, Joshua N. Winn & Robert D. Meade - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
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  6.  12
    A Bishop and His World Before the Gregorian Reform: Hubert of Angers, 1006- 1047.Steven Fanning.Penelope D. Johnson - 1990 - Speculum 65 (1):150-152.
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  7.  38
    Persons Pursuing Goods: Steven D. Smith.Steven D. Smith - 2007 - Legal Theory 13 (3-4):285-313.
    John Finnis's powerfully and deservedly influential modern classic, Natural Law and Natural Rights, expounds a theory of law and morality that is based on a picture of “persons” using practical reason to pursue certain “basic goods.” While devoting much attention to practical reason and to the goods, however, Finnis says little about the nature of personhood. This relative inattention to what “persons” are creates a risk—one that Finnis himself notices—of assuming or importing an inadequate anthropology. This essay suggests that the (...)
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  8.  22
    Cooperation with Multiple Audiences.Marilynn Johnson - 2016 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):203-228.
    Steven Pinker proposes a game-theoretic framework to help explain the use of veiled speech in contexts where the ultimate aims of the speaker and hearer may diverge—such as cases of bribing a police officer to get out of a ticket and paying a maître d’ to get a table. This is presented as a response to what Pinker sees as the failure in H. P. Grice’s influential theory of meaning to recognize that speakers and hearers are not always cooperating. (...)
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  9. Relativism and the Foundations of Philosophy.Steven D. Hales - 2006 - MIT Press.
    The grand and sweeping claims of many relativists might seem to amount to the argument that everything is relative--except the thesis of relativism. In this book, Steven Hales defends relativism, but in a more circumscribed form that applies specifically to philosophical propositions. His claim is that philosophical propositions are relatively true--true in some perspectives and false in others. Hales defends this argument first by examining rational intuition as the method by which philosophers come to have the beliefs they do. (...)
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  10. Why Every Theory of Luck is Wrong.Steven D. Hales - 2016 - Noûs 50 (3):490-508.
    There are three theories of luck in the literature, each of which tends to appeal to philosophers pursuing different concerns. These are the probability, modal, and control views. I will argue that all three theories are irreparably defective; not only are there counterexamples to each of the three theories of luck, but there are three previously undiscussed classes of counterexamples against them. These are the problems of lucky necessities, skillful luck, and diachronic luck. I conclude that a serious reevaluation of (...)
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  11.  51
    Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy.Steven D. Hales - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (1):229-233.
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  12. Three Versions of an Ethics of Care.Steven D. Edwards - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):231-240.
    The ethics of care still appeals to many in spite of penetrating criticisms of it which have been presented over the past 15 years or so. This paper tries to offer an explanation for this, and then to critically engage with three versions of an ethics of care. The explanation consists firstly in the close affinities between nursing and care. The three versions identified below are by Gilligan (1982 ), a second by Tronto (1993 ), and a third by Gastmans (...)
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  13. Nietzsche's Perspectivism.Steven D. Hales & Rex Welshon - 2000 - University of Illinois Press.
    In "Nietzsche's Perspectivism", Steven Hales and Rex Welshon offer an analytic approach to Nietzsche's important idea that truth is perspectival. Drawing on Nietzsche's entire published corpus, along with manuscripts he never saw to press, they assess the different perspectivisms at work in Nietzsche's views with regard to truth, logic, causality, knowledge, consciousness, and the self. They also examine Nietzsche's perspectivist ontology of power and the attendant claims that substances and subjects are illusory while forces and alliances of power constitute (...)
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  14. The Faculty of Intuition.Steven D. Hales - 2012 - Analytic Philosophy 53 (2):180-207.
    The present paper offers an analogical support for the use of rational intuition, namely, if we regard sense perception as a mental faculty that (in general) delivers justified beliefs, then we should treat intuition in the same manner. I will argue that both the cognitive marks of intuition and the role it traditionally plays in epistemology are strongly analogous to that of perception, and barring specific arguments to the contrary, we should treat rational intuition as a source of prima facie (...)
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  15. A Problem for Moral Luck.Steven D. Hales - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (9):2385-2403.
    The present paper poses a new problem for moral luck. Defenders of moral luck uncritically rely on a broader theory of luck known as the control theory or the lack of control theory. However, there are are two other analyses of luck in the literature that dominate discussion in epistemology, namely the probability and modal theories. However, moral luck is nonexistent under the probability and modal accounts, but the control theory cannot explain epistemic luck. While some have posited that “luck” (...)
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  16. A Consistent Relativism.Steven D. Hales - 1997 - Mind 106 (421):33-52.
    Relativism is one of the most tenacious theories about truth, with a pedigree as old as philosophy itself. Nearly as ancient is the chief criticism of relativism, namely the charge that the theory is self-refuting. This paper develops a logic of relativism that (1) illuminates the classic self-refutation charge and shows how to escape it; (2) makes rigorous the ideas of truth as relative and truth as absolute, and shows the relations between them; (3) develops an intensional logic for relativism; (...)
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  17.  14
    The Myth of Luck: Philosophy, Fate, and Fortune.Steven D. Hales - 2020 - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Humanity has thrown everything we have at implacable luck—novel theologies, entire philosophical movements, fresh branches of mathematics—and yet we seem to have gained only the smallest edge on the power of fortune. The Myth of Luck tells us why we have been fighting an unconquerable foe. Taking us on a guided tour of one of our oldest concepts, we begin in ancient Greece and Rome, considering how Plato, Plutarch, and the Stoics understood luck, before entering the theoretical world of probability (...)
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  18. Psychology Without Foundations: History, Philosophy and Psychosocial Theory.Steven D. Brown - 2009 - Sage Publications.
    This new book proposes a way out of the crisis by letting go of the idea that psychology needs ‘new’ foundations or a new identity, whether biological, discursive, or cognitive. The psychological is not narrowly confined to any one aspect of human experience; it is quite literally ‘everywhere’. Drawing on a range of influential thinkers including Michel Serres, Michel Foucault, AN Whitehead, and Gilles Deleuze, the book proposes a strong process-oriented approach to the psychological, which studies ‘events’ or ‘occasions.’.
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  19.  73
    Motivations for Relativism as a Solution to Disagreements.Steven D. Hales - 2014 - Philosophy 89 (1):63-82.
    There are five basic ways to resolve disagreements: keep arguing until capitulation, compromise, locate an ambiguity or contextual factors, accept Pyrrhonian skepticism, and adopt relativism. Relativism is perhaps the most radical and least popular solution to a disagreement, and its defenders generally think the best motivator for relativism is to be found in disputes over predicates of personal taste. I argue that taste predicates do not adequately motivate relativism over the other possible solutions, and argue that relativism looks like the (...)
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  20. A Companion to Relativism.Steven D. Hales (ed.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _A Companion to Relativism_ presents original contributions from leading scholars that address the latest thinking on the role of relativism in the philosophy of language, epistemology, ethics, philosophy of science, logic, and metaphysics. Features original contributions from many of the leading figures working on various aspects of relativism Presents a substantial, broad range of current thinking about relativism Addresses relativism from many of the major subfields of philosophy, including philosophy of language, epistemology, ethics, philosophy of science, logic, and metaphysics.
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  21. Epistemic Closure Principles.Steven D. Hales - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):185-202.
    This paper evaluates a number of closure principles (for both knowledge and justification) that have appeared in the literature. Counterexamples are presented to all but one of these principles, which is conceded to be true but trivially so. It is argued that a consequence of the failure of these closure principles is that certain projects of doxastic logic are doomed, and that doxastic logic is of dubious merit for epistemologists interested in actual knowers in the actual world.
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  22.  21
    Is There a Distinctive Care Ethics?Steven D. Edwards - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (2):184-191.
    Is it true that an ethics of care offers something distinct from other approaches to ethical problems in nursing, especially principlism? In this article an attempt is made to clarify an ethics of care and then to argue that there need be no substantial difference between principlism and an ethics of care when the latter is considered in the context of nursing. The article begins by considering the question of how one could in fact differentiate moral theories. As is explained, (...)
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  23.  19
    The Intellectual Virtues and the Life of the Mind. [REVIEW]Steven D. Hales - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (175):254.
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  24.  31
    The 'Demented Other' or Simply 'a Person'? Extending the Philosophical Discourse of Naue and Kroll Through the Situated Self.Steven R. Sabat, Ann Johnson, Caroline Swarbrick & John Keady - 2011 - Nursing Philosophy 12 (4):282-292.
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  25. Schooling Sexualities.D. Epstein & R. Johnson - 2000 - British Journal of Educational Studies 48 (2):204-205.
     
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  26.  63
    Huey D. Johnson: Green Plans: Blueprint for a Sustainable Earth: University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, NE, 2008, 208 P Index ISBN 9789803260207 Paperback $ 18.95. [REVIEW]Devparna Roy - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):513-516.
    Huey D. Johnson: Green Plans: Blueprint for a Sustainable Earth Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s10806-012-9388-9 Authors Devparna Roy, Polson Institute for Global Development, Department of Development Sociology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  27.  17
    Michel Serres.Steven D. Brown - 2002 - Theory, Culture and Society 19 (3):1-27.
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  28. The Problem of Intuition.Steven D. Hales - 2000 - American Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2):135-147.
    Traditional philosophy relies heavily on the use of rational intuition to establish theses and conclusions. This essay takes up the matter of intuition and argues for a stunning conclusion: appeal to rational intuition is epistemically justified only if a form of foundationalism is true. This type of foundationalism is the thesis that there is at least one proposition whose justification depends on nothing other than itself. The article also argues that unless we can establish that some intuitions are justified, philosophy (...)
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  29. Newman’s First Two Notes on Development and Patristic Millenarianism.Steven D. Aguzzi - 2014 - Newman Studies Journal 11 (2):4-19.
    In recent years, critical discourse concerning the millenarian eschatology of the early Patristic era of Christianity has called into question the common notion that millenarian concepts have been utterly rejected as heretical by the Roman Catholic Church. No Ecumenical Council has ever rejected millenarian eschatology, and papal and juridical statements on the issue have been taken out of context. This essay brings forward, as testing agents, John Henry Newman’s first two notes in Development in order to determine whether Patristic millenarianism, (...)
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  30. No Time Travel for Presentists.Steven D. Hales - 2010 - Logos and Episteme 1 (2):353-360.
    In the present paper, I offer a new argument to show that presentism about time is incompatible with time travel. Time travel requires leaving the present, which, under presentism, contains all of reality. Therefore to leave the present moment is to leave reality entirely; i.e. to go out of existence. Presentist “time travel” is therefore best seen as a form of suicide, not as a mode of transportation. Eternalists about time do not face the same difficulty, and time travel is (...)
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  31. Evidence and the Afterlife.Steven D. Hales - 2001 - Philosophia 28 (1-4):335-346.
    Several prominent philosophers, including A.J. Ayer and Derek Parfit, have offered the evidentiary requirements for believing human personality can reincarnate, and hence that Cartesian dualism is true. At least one philosopher, Robert Almeder, has argued that there are actual cases which satisfy these requirements. I argue in this paper that even if we grant the empirical data-a large concession-belief in reincarnation is still unjustified. The problem is that without a theoretical account of the alleged cases of reincarnation, the empirical evidence (...)
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  32.  76
    The Body as Object Versus the Body as Subject: The Case of Disability.Steven D. Edwards - 1998 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 1 (1):47-56.
    This paper is prompted by the charge that the prevailing Western paradigm of medical knowledge is essentially Cartesian. Hence, illness, disease, disability, etc. are said to be conceived of in Cartesian terms. The paper attempts to make use of the critique of Cartesianism in medicine developed by certain commentators, notably Leder (1992), in order to expose Cartesian commitments in conceptions of disability. The paper also attempts to sketch an alternative conception of disability — one partly inspired by the work of (...)
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  33.  9
    Epistemic Closure Principles.Steven D. Hales - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):185-201.
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  34. Intuition, Revelation, and Relativism.Steven D. Hales - 2004 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):271 – 295.
    This paper defends the view that philosophical propositions are merely relatively true, i.e. true relative to a doxastic perspective defined at least in part by a non-inferential belief-acquiring method. Here is the strategy: first, the primary way that contemporary philosophers defend their views is through the use of rational intuition, and this method delivers non-inferential, basic beliefs which are then systematized and brought into reflective equilibrium. Second, Christian theologians use exactly the same methodology, only replacing intuition with revelation. Third, intuition (...)
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  35. Nietzsche on Logic.Steven D. Hales - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (4):819-835.
    Nietzsche is infamous for denouncing logic, but despite the importance of logic in contemporary philosophy, there has been very little scholarly attention paid to his criticisms. This paper argues that Nietzsche's antilogic polemics are directed against semantics, which he regards as being committed to a realist metaphysics. It is this metaphysical realism that Nietzsche abhors, not logical syntax or proof theory. Nietzsche is also at pains to critique logicians who naively accept realist semantics. Other interpreters who cast Nietzsche as a (...)
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  36. Moral Luck and Control.Steven D. Hales - 2019 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 43 (1):42-58.
    There is no such thing as moral luck or everyone is profoundly mistaken about its nature and a radical rethinking of moral luck is needed. The argument to be developed is not complicated, and relies almost entirely on premises that should seem obviously correct to anyone who follows the moral luck literature. The conclusion, however, is surprising and disturbing. The classic cases of moral luck always involve an agent who lacks control over an event whose occurrence affects her praiseworthiness or (...)
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  37.  7
    Accountability for Human Rights Atrocities in International Law: Beyond the Nuremberg Legacy: Steven R. Ratner and Jason S. Abrams. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. [REVIEW]Steven D. Roper - 2004 - Human Rights Review 5 (4):130-131.
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  38.  83
    Three Concepts of Suffering.Steven D. Edwards - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):59-66.
    This paper has three main aims. The first is to provide a critical assessment of two rival concepts of suffering, that proposed by Cassell and that proposed in this journal by van Hooft. The second aim of the paper is to sketch a more plausible concept of suffering, one which derives from a Wittgensteinian view of linguistic meaning. This more plausible concept is labeled an ‘intuitive concept’. The third aim is to assess the prospects for scientific understanding of suffering.
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  39.  17
    Why Sports Medicine is Not Medicine.Steven D. Edwards & Mike McNamee - 2006 - Health Care Analysis 14 (2):103-109.
    Sports Medicine as an apparent sub-class of medicine has developed apace over the past 30 years. Its recent trajectory has been evidenced by the emergence of specialist international research journals, standard texts, annual conferences, academic appointments and postgraduate courses. Although this field of enquiry and practice lays claim to the title ‘sports medicine’ this paper queries the legitimacy of that claim. Depending upon how ‘sports medicine’ and ‘medicine’ are defined, a plausible-sounding case can be made to show that sports medicine (...)
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  40.  15
    Why the Coming Debate Over the QALY and Disability Will Be Different.Steven D. Pearson - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):304-307.
  41.  20
    Can Supervising Self-Harm Be Part of Ethical Nursing Practice?Steven D. Edwards & Jeanette Hewitt - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (1):79-87.
    It was reported in 2006 that a regime of ‘supervised self harm’ had been implemented at St George’s Hospital, Stafford. This involves patients with a history of self-harming behaviour being offered both emotional and practical support to enable them to do so. This support can extend to the provision of knives or razors to enable them to self-harm while they are being supervised by a nurse. This article discusses, and evaluates from an ethical perspective, three competing responses to self-harming behaviours: (...)
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  42. Truth, Paradox, and Nietzschean Perspectivism.Steven D. Hales & Robert C. Welshon - 1994 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (1):101 - 119.
    We argue that Nietzsche's interest in truth is more than merely a critical one. He criticizes one historically prominent conception of truth while proposing his own theory, called "perspectivism". However, Nietzsche's truth perspectivism appears to face a self-referential paradox, which is explored in detail. We argue that no commentator has yet solved this puzzle, and then provide our own solution. This solution, which depends upon distinguishing between weak and strong perspectivism while promoting the former, supplies Nietzsche with a consistent truth (...)
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  43. Moral Relativism and Evolutionary Psychology.Steven D. Hales - 2009 - Synthese 166 (2):431 - 447.
    I argue that evolutionary strategies of kin selection and game-theoretic reciprocity are apt to generate agent-centered and agent- neutral moral intuitions, respectively. Such intuitions are the building blocks of moral theories, resulting in a fundamental schism between agent-centered theories on the one hand and agent-neutral theories on the other. An agent-neutral moral theory is one according to which everyone has the same duties and moral aims, no matter what their personal interests or interpersonal relationships. Agent-centered moral theories deny this and (...)
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  44.  61
    Reply to Licon on Time Travel.Steven D. Hales - 2011 - Logos and Episteme 2 (4):633-636.
    In this paper I offer a rejoinder to the criticisms raised by Jimmy Alfonso Licon in “No Suicide for Presentists: A Response to Hales.” I argue that Licon's concerns are misplaced, and that his hypothetical presentist time machine neither travels in time nor saves the life of the putative traveler. I conclude that sensible time travel is still forbidden to presentists.
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  45.  1
    Demands of Justice: The Creation of a Global Human Rights Practice by Ann Marie Clark: New York: Cambridge University Press, 2022.Steven D. Roper - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (3):447-449.
  46.  35
    Organizational Change, Normative Control Deinstitutionalization, and Corruption.Kelly D. Martin, Jean L. Johnson & John B. Cullen - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (1):105-130.
    Despite widespread attention to corruption and organizational change in the literature, to our knowledge, no research has attempted to understand the linkages between these two powerful organizational phenomena. Accordingly, we draw on major theories in ethics, sociology, and management to develop a theoretical framework for understanding how organizational change can sometimes generate corruption. We extend anomie theory and ethical climate theory to articulate the deinstitutionalization of the normative control system and argue that, through this deinstitutionalization, organizations have the potential to (...)
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  47.  79
    Nordenfelt's Theory of Disability.Steven D. Edwards - 1998 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):89-100.
    This paper is an attempt to provide a critical evaluation of the theory of disability put forward by Lennart Nordenfelt. The paper is in five sections. The first sets out the main elements of Nordenfelt's theory. The second section elaborates the theory further, identifies a tension in the theory, and three kinds of problems for it. The tension derives from Nordenfelt's attempt to respect two important but conflicting constraints on a theory of health. The problems derive from characterisation of the (...)
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  48.  44
    Conrad D. Johnson, Moral Legislation: A Legal-Political Model for Indirect Consequentialist Reasoning, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1991, Pp. 232.L. W. Sumner - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (1):122.
  49.  3
    Vital Spaces and Mental Health.Steven D. Brown & Paula Reavey - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (2):131-140.
    The impact of social and material conditions on mental health is well established but lacking in a coherent approach. We offer the concept of ‘vitality’ as means of describing how environments facilitate ‘feelings of being alive’ that cut across existing diagnostic categories. Drawing on the work of Stern, Fuchs, Worms and Duff, we argue that vitality is not solely a quality of an individual body, but rather emerges from attunements and resonances between bodies and materials. We use vitality as a (...)
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  50.  86
    Thinking Tools: You Can Prove a Negative.Steven D. Hales - 2005 - Think 4 (10):109-112.
    A demonstration that you can prove a negative.
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