Results for 'Steven D. Ealy'

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  1. Dostoevsky's Political Thought.Ethan Alexander-Davey, Steven D. Ealy, Khalil M. Habib, Michael Kochin, John P. Moran, Ellis Sandoz, Ron Srigley, David Walsh & Jingcai Ying - 2013 - Lexington Books.
    This book explores Dostoevsky as a political thinker from his religious and philosophical foundation to nineteenth-century European politics and how themes that he had examined are still relevant for us today.
     
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  2.  38
    Persons Pursuing Goods: Steven D. Smith.Steven D. Smith - 2007 - Legal Theory 13 (3-4):285-313.
    John Finnis's powerfully and deservedly influential modern classic, Natural Law and Natural Rights, expounds a theory of law and morality that is based on a picture of “persons” using practical reason to pursue certain “basic goods.” While devoting much attention to practical reason and to the goods, however, Finnis says little about the nature of personhood. This relative inattention to what “persons” are creates a risk—one that Finnis himself notices—of assuming or importing an inadequate anthropology. This essay suggests that the (...)
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  3. The Faculty of Intuition.Steven D. Hales - 2012 - Analytic Philosophy 53 (2):180-207.
    The present paper offers an analogical support for the use of rational intuition, namely, if we regard sense perception as a mental faculty that (in general) delivers justified beliefs, then we should treat intuition in the same manner. I will argue that both the cognitive marks of intuition and the role it traditionally plays in epistemology are strongly analogous to that of perception, and barring specific arguments to the contrary, we should treat rational intuition as a source of prima facie (...)
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  4. Relativism and the Foundations of Philosophy.Steven D. Hales - 2006 - MIT Press.
    The grand and sweeping claims of many relativists might seem to amount to the argument that everything is relative--except the thesis of relativism. In this book, Steven Hales defends relativism, but in a more circumscribed form that applies specifically to philosophical propositions. His claim is that philosophical propositions are relatively true--true in some perspectives and false in others. Hales defends this argument first by examining rational intuition as the method by which philosophers come to have the beliefs they do. (...)
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  5. Three Versions of an Ethics of Care.Steven D. Edwards - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):231-240.
    The ethics of care still appeals to many in spite of penetrating criticisms of it which have been presented over the past 15 years or so. This paper tries to offer an explanation for this, and then to critically engage with three versions of an ethics of care. The explanation consists firstly in the close affinities between nursing and care. The three versions identified below are by Gilligan (1982 ), a second by Tronto (1993 ), and a third by Gastmans (...)
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  6. Why Every Theory of Luck is Wrong.Steven D. Hales - 2016 - Noûs 50 (3):490-508.
    There are three theories of luck in the literature, each of which tends to appeal to philosophers pursuing different concerns. These are the probability, modal, and control views. I will argue that all three theories are irreparably defective; not only are there counterexamples to each of the three theories of luck, but there are three previously undiscussed classes of counterexamples against them. These are the problems of lucky necessities, skillful luck, and diachronic luck. I conclude that a serious reevaluation of (...)
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  7. Epistemic Closure Principles.Steven D. Hales - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):185-202.
    This paper evaluates a number of closure principles (for both knowledge and justification) that have appeared in the literature. Counterexamples are presented to all but one of these principles, which is conceded to be true but trivially so. It is argued that a consequence of the failure of these closure principles is that certain projects of doxastic logic are doomed, and that doxastic logic is of dubious merit for epistemologists interested in actual knowers in the actual world.
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  8. Nietzsche's Perspectivism.Steven D. Hales & Rex Welshon - 2000 - University of Illinois Press.
    In "Nietzsche's Perspectivism", Steven Hales and Rex Welshon offer an analytic approach to Nietzsche's important idea that truth is perspectival. Drawing on Nietzsche's entire published corpus, along with manuscripts he never saw to press, they assess the different perspectivisms at work in Nietzsche's views with regard to truth, logic, causality, knowledge, consciousness, and the self. They also examine Nietzsche's perspectivist ontology of power and the attendant claims that substances and subjects are illusory while forces and alliances of power constitute (...)
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  9. A Problem for Moral Luck.Steven D. Hales - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (9):2385-2403.
    The present paper poses a new problem for moral luck. Defenders of moral luck uncritically rely on a broader theory of luck known as the control theory or the lack of control theory. However, there are are two other analyses of luck in the literature that dominate discussion in epistemology, namely the probability and modal theories. However, moral luck is nonexistent under the probability and modal accounts, but the control theory cannot explain epistemic luck. While some have posited that “luck” (...)
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  10.  49
    Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy.Steven D. Hales - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (1):229-233.
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  11. A Consistent Relativism.Steven D. Hales - 1997 - Mind 106 (421):33-52.
    Relativism is one of the most tenacious theories about truth, with a pedigree as old as philosophy itself. Nearly as ancient is the chief criticism of relativism, namely the charge that the theory is self-refuting. This paper develops a logic of relativism that (1) illuminates the classic self-refutation charge and shows how to escape it; (2) makes rigorous the ideas of truth as relative and truth as absolute, and shows the relations between them; (3) develops an intensional logic for relativism; (...)
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  12.  9
    Epistemic Closure Principles.Steven D. Hales - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):185-201.
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  13.  17
    Michel Serres.Steven D. Brown - 2002 - Theory, Culture and Society 19 (3):1-27.
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  14.  13
    Toward the Rigorous Use of Diagrams in Reasoning About Hardware.Steven D. Johnson, Jon Barwise & Gerard Allwein - 1996 - In Gerard Allwein & Jon Barwise (eds.), Logical Reasoning with Diagrams. Oxford University Press.
  15.  67
    Motivations for Relativism as a Solution to Disagreements.Steven D. Hales - 2014 - Philosophy 89 (1):63-82.
    There are five basic ways to resolve disagreements: keep arguing until capitulation, compromise, locate an ambiguity or contextual factors, accept Pyrrhonian skepticism, and adopt relativism. Relativism is perhaps the most radical and least popular solution to a disagreement, and its defenders generally think the best motivator for relativism is to be found in disputes over predicates of personal taste. I argue that taste predicates do not adequately motivate relativism over the other possible solutions, and argue that relativism looks like the (...)
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  16. A Companion to Relativism.Steven D. Hales (ed.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _A Companion to Relativism_ presents original contributions from leading scholars that address the latest thinking on the role of relativism in the philosophy of language, epistemology, ethics, philosophy of science, logic, and metaphysics. Features original contributions from many of the leading figures working on various aspects of relativism Presents a substantial, broad range of current thinking about relativism Addresses relativism from many of the major subfields of philosophy, including philosophy of language, epistemology, ethics, philosophy of science, logic, and metaphysics.
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  17.  17
    The Intellectual Virtues and the Life of the Mind. [REVIEW]Steven D. Hales - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (175):254.
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  18.  62
    Luck Attributions and Cognitive Bias.Steven D. Hales & Jennifer Adrienne Johnson - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (4-5):509-528.
    Philosophers have developed three theories of luck: the probability theory, the modal theory, and the control theory. To help assess these theories, we conducted an empirical investigation of luck attributions. We created eight putative luck scenarios and framed each in either a positive or a negative light. Furthermore, we placed the critical luck event at the beginning, middle, or end of the scenario to see if the location of the event influenced luck attributions. We found that attributions of luckiness were (...)
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  19. The Problem of Intuition.Steven D. Hales - 2000 - American Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2):135-147.
    Traditional philosophy relies heavily on the use of rational intuition to establish theses and conclusions. This essay takes up the matter of intuition and argues for a stunning conclusion: appeal to rational intuition is epistemically justified only if a form of foundationalism is true. This type of foundationalism is the thesis that there is at least one proposition whose justification depends on nothing other than itself. The article also argues that unless we can establish that some intuitions are justified, philosophy (...)
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  20.  7
    The Myth of Luck: Philosophy, Fate, and Fortune.Steven D. Hales - 2020 - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Humanity has thrown everything we have at implacable luck—novel theologies, entire philosophical movements, fresh branches of mathematics—and yet we seem to have gained only the smallest edge on the power of fortune. The Myth of Luck tells us why we have been fighting an unconquerable foe. Taking us on a guided tour of one of our oldest concepts, we begin in ancient Greece and Rome, considering how Plato, Plutarch, and the Stoics understood luck, before entering the theoretical world of probability (...)
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  21.  21
    Is There a Distinctive Care Ethics?Steven D. Edwards - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (2):184-191.
    Is it true that an ethics of care offers something distinct from other approaches to ethical problems in nursing, especially principlism? In this article an attempt is made to clarify an ethics of care and then to argue that there need be no substantial difference between principlism and an ethics of care when the latter is considered in the context of nursing. The article begins by considering the question of how one could in fact differentiate moral theories. As is explained, (...)
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  22. No Time Travel for Presentists.Steven D. Hales - 2010 - Logos and Episteme 1 (2):353-360.
    In the present paper, I offer a new argument to show that presentism about time is incompatible with time travel. Time travel requires leaving the present, which, under presentism, contains all of reality. Therefore to leave the present moment is to leave reality entirely; i.e. to go out of existence. Presentist “time travel” is therefore best seen as a form of suicide, not as a mode of transportation. Eternalists about time do not face the same difficulty, and time travel is (...)
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  23.  35
    God Embodied in, God Bodying Forth the World: Emergence and Christian Theology.Steven D. Crain - 2006 - Zygon 41 (3):665-674.
  24. Evidence and the Afterlife.Steven D. Hales - 2001 - Philosophia 28 (1-4):335-346.
    Several prominent philosophers, including A.J. Ayer and Derek Parfit, have offered the evidentiary requirements for believing human personality can reincarnate, and hence that Cartesian dualism is true. At least one philosopher, Robert Almeder, has argued that there are actual cases which satisfy these requirements. I argue in this paper that even if we grant the empirical data-a large concession-belief in reincarnation is still unjustified. The problem is that without a theoretical account of the alleged cases of reincarnation, the empirical evidence (...)
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  25. Nietzsche on Logic.Steven D. Hales - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (4):819-835.
    Nietzsche is infamous for denouncing logic, but despite the importance of logic in contemporary philosophy, there has been very little scholarly attention paid to his criticisms. This paper argues that Nietzsche's antilogic polemics are directed against semantics, which he regards as being committed to a realist metaphysics. It is this metaphysical realism that Nietzsche abhors, not logical syntax or proof theory. Nietzsche is also at pains to critique logicians who naively accept realist semantics. Other interpreters who cast Nietzsche as a (...)
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  26.  11
    Dispositional Optimism and Luck Attributions: Implications for Philosophical Theories of Luck.Steven D. Hales & Jennifer Adrienne Johnson - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (7):1027-1045.
    ABSTRACTWe conducted two studies to determine whether there is a relationship between dispositional optimism and the attribution of good or bad luck to ambiguous luck scenarios. Study 1 presented five scenarios that contained both a lucky and an unlucky component, thereby making them ambiguous in regard to being an overall case of good or bad luck. Participants rated each scenario in toto on a four-point Likert scale and then completed an optimism questionnaire. The results showed a significant correlation between optimism (...)
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  27.  75
    The Body as Object Versus the Body as Subject: The Case of Disability.Steven D. Edwards - 1998 - Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (1):47-56.
    This paper is prompted by the charge that the prevailing Western paradigm of medical knowledge is essentially Cartesian. Hence, illness, disease, disability, etc. are said to be conceived of in Cartesian terms. The paper attempts to make use of the critique of Cartesianism in medicine developed by certain commentators, notably Leder (1992), in order to expose Cartesian commitments in conceptions of disability. The paper also attempts to sketch an alternative conception of disability — one partly inspired by the work of (...)
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  28.  82
    Three Concepts of Suffering.Steven D. Edwards - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):59-66.
    This paper has three main aims. The first is to provide a critical assessment of two rival concepts of suffering, that proposed by Cassell and that proposed in this journal by van Hooft. The second aim of the paper is to sketch a more plausible concept of suffering, one which derives from a Wittgensteinian view of linguistic meaning. This more plausible concept is labeled an ‘intuitive concept’. The third aim is to assess the prospects for scientific understanding of suffering.
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  29.  12
    Why the Coming Debate Over the QALY and Disability Will Be Different.Steven D. Pearson - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):304-307.
  30. Truth, Paradox, and Nietzschean Perspectivism.Steven D. Hales & Robert C. Welshon - 1994 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (1):101 - 119.
    We argue that Nietzsche's interest in truth is more than merely a critical one. He criticizes one historically prominent conception of truth while proposing his own theory, called "perspectivism". However, Nietzsche's truth perspectivism appears to face a self-referential paradox, which is explored in detail. We argue that no commentator has yet solved this puzzle, and then provide our own solution. This solution, which depends upon distinguishing between weak and strong perspectivism while promoting the former, supplies Nietzsche with a consistent truth (...)
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  31. Moral Relativism and Evolutionary Psychology.Steven D. Hales - 2009 - Synthese 166 (2):431 - 447.
    I argue that evolutionary strategies of kin selection and game-theoretic reciprocity are apt to generate agent-centered and agent- neutral moral intuitions, respectively. Such intuitions are the building blocks of moral theories, resulting in a fundamental schism between agent-centered theories on the one hand and agent-neutral theories on the other. An agent-neutral moral theory is one according to which everyone has the same duties and moral aims, no matter what their personal interests or interpersonal relationships. Agent-centered moral theories deny this and (...)
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  32. Intuition, Revelation, and Relativism.Steven D. Hales - 2004 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):271 – 295.
    This paper defends the view that philosophical propositions are merely relatively true, i.e. true relative to a doxastic perspective defined at least in part by a non-inferential belief-acquiring method. Here is the strategy: first, the primary way that contemporary philosophers defend their views is through the use of rational intuition, and this method delivers non-inferential, basic beliefs which are then systematized and brought into reflective equilibrium. Second, Christian theologians use exactly the same methodology, only replacing intuition with revelation. Third, intuition (...)
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  33.  60
    Reply to Licon on Time Travel.Steven D. Hales - 2011 - Logos and Episteme 2 (4):633-636.
    In this paper I offer a rejoinder to the criticisms raised by Jimmy Alfonso Licon in “No Suicide for Presentists: A Response to Hales.” I argue that Licon's concerns are misplaced, and that his hypothetical presentist time machine neither travels in time nor saves the life of the putative traveler. I conclude that sensible time travel is still forbidden to presentists.
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  34.  17
    Why Sports Medicine is Not Medicine.Steven D. Edwards & Mike McNamee - 2006 - Health Care Analysis 14 (2):103-109.
    Sports Medicine as an apparent sub-class of medicine has developed apace over the past 30 years. Its recent trajectory has been evidenced by the emergence of specialist international research journals, standard texts, annual conferences, academic appointments and postgraduate courses. Although this field of enquiry and practice lays claim to the title ‘sports medicine’ this paper queries the legitimacy of that claim. Depending upon how ‘sports medicine’ and ‘medicine’ are defined, a plausible-sounding case can be made to show that sports medicine (...)
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  35.  19
    Can Supervising Self-Harm Be Part of Ethical Nursing Practice?Steven D. Edwards & Jeanette Hewitt - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (1):79-87.
    It was reported in 2006 that a regime of ‘supervised self harm’ had been implemented at St George’s Hospital, Stafford. This involves patients with a history of self-harming behaviour being offered both emotional and practical support to enable them to do so. This support can extend to the provision of knives or razors to enable them to self-harm while they are being supervised by a nurse. This article discusses, and evaluates from an ethical perspective, three competing responses to self-harming behaviours: (...)
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  36.  3
    Vital Spaces and Mental Health.Steven D. Brown & Paula Reavey - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (2):131-140.
    The impact of social and material conditions on mental health is well established but lacking in a coherent approach. We offer the concept of ‘vitality’ as means of describing how environments facilitate ‘feelings of being alive’ that cut across existing diagnostic categories. Drawing on the work of Stern, Fuchs, Worms and Duff, we argue that vitality is not solely a quality of an individual body, but rather emerges from attunements and resonances between bodies and materials. We use vitality as a (...)
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  37. Self-Deception and Belief Attribution.Steven D. Hales - 1994 - Synthese 101 (2):273-289.
    One of the most common views about self-deception ascribes contradictory beliefs to the self-deceiver. In this paper it is argued that this view (the contradiction strategy) is inconsistent with plausible common-sense principles of belief attribution. Other dubious assumptions made by contradiction strategists are also examined. It is concluded that the contradiction strategy is an inadequate account of self-deception. Two other well-known views — those of Robert Audi and Alfred Mele — are investigated and found wanting. A new theory of self-deception (...)
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  38.  9
    Is Fragmented Financing Bad for Your Health?Steven D. Pizer & John A. Gardner - 2011 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 48 (2):109-122.
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  39. The Impossibility of Unconditional Love.Steven D. Hales - 1995 - Public Affairs Quarterly 9 (4):317-320.
    There are two main ways to understand unconditional love. I argue that one is impossible (i.e., no one could love that way) and the other is probably irrational. This has important consequences in a variety of domains. Social policies have been derided on the grounds that they undermine unconditional love, and it has been called "possibly the most valuable aspect of the Christian tradition". The works of Robert Nozick, Elizabeth Anderson, and Richard Taylor on this topic are examined and criticized.
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  40.  32
    Which Orphans Will Find a Home? The Rule of Rescue in Resource Allocation for Rare Diseases.Emily A. Largent & Steven D. Pearson - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (1):27-34.
    The rule of rescue describes the moral impulse to save identifiable lives in immediate danger at any expense. Think of the extremes taken to rescue a small child who has fallen down a well, a woman pinned beneath the rubble of an earthquake, or a submarine crew trapped on the ocean floor. No effort is deemed too great. Yet should this same moral instinct to rescue, regardless of cost, be applied in the emergency room, the hospital, or the community clinic? (...)
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  41.  79
    Nordenfelt's Theory of Disability.Steven D. Edwards - 1998 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):89-100.
    This paper is an attempt to provide a critical evaluation of the theory of disability put forward by Lennart Nordenfelt. The paper is in five sections. The first sets out the main elements of Nordenfelt's theory. The second section elaborates the theory further, identifies a tension in the theory, and three kinds of problems for it. The tension derives from Nordenfelt's attempt to respect two important but conflicting constraints on a theory of health. The problems derive from characterisation of the (...)
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  42.  14
    An Example of Extreme Near-Surface Variability in Shallow Seismic Reflection Data.Steven D. Sloan, J. Tyler Schwenk & Robert H. Stevens - 2016 - Interpretation: SEG 4 (3):SH1-SH9.
    Variability of material properties in the shallow subsurface presents challenges for near-surface geophysical methods and exploration-scale applications. As the depth of investigation decreases, denser sampling is required, especially of the near offsets, to accurately characterize the shallow subsurface. We have developed a field data example using high-resolution shallow seismic reflection data to demonstrate how quickly near-surface properties can change over short distances and the effects on field data and processed sections. The addition of a relatively thin, 20 cm thick, low-velocity (...)
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  43.  70
    Reincarnation Redux.Steven D. Hales - 2001 - Philosophia 28 (1-4):359-367.
    This paper is a rejoinder to Robert Almeder's "On Reincarnation: A Reply to Hales". I argue that even if we stipulate the case studies of the reincarnationists to be good data, the explanatory hypothesis of reincarnation is a deus ex machina. Without a comprehensive scientific or philosophical theory of the mind that embeds the reincarnation hypothesis, the view should not be taken seriously. The fact that reincarnation is the first explanation of the case studies that comes to mind says more (...)
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  44.  5
    LAW's QUANDARY.Steven D. Smith - 2004 - Harvard University Press.
    This lively book reassesses a century of jurisprudential thought from a fresh perspective, and points to a malaise that currently afflicts not only legal theory ...
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  45.  85
    Thinking Tools: You Can Prove a Negative.Steven D. Hales - 2005 - Think 4 (10):109-112.
    A demonstration that you can prove a negative.
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  46.  87
    The Logic of Mystery.Steven D. Boyer - 2007 - Religious Studies 43 (1):89-102.
    This paper proposes an analytical taxonomy of ‘mystery’ based upon what makes a mystery mysterious. I begin by distinguishing mysteries that depend on what we do not know (e.g. detective fiction) from mysteries that depend on what we do know (e.g. religious mysteries). Then I distinguish three possible grounds for the latter type. The third and most provocative ground offers a mathematical analogy for how rational reflection can be appropriate to mystery without compromising its intrinsically mysterious character. I conclude with (...)
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  47.  13
    Nursing Practice and the Definition of Human Death.Steven D. Edwards & Kevin Forbes - 2003 - Nursing Inquiry 10 (4):229-235.
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  48. "Evidence and the Afterlife" Several Prominent Philosophers, Including A.J. Ayer and Derek Parfit, Have.Steven D. Hales - 2001 - Philosophia 28 (1-4):335-346.
    vol. 28, nos. 1-4, 2001 empirical data-a large concession-belief in reincarnation is still unjustified.
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  49.  64
    The Case of Ashley X.Steven D. Edwards - 2011 - Clinical Ethics 6 (1):39-44.
    This paper recounts the events surrounding the case of Ashley X, a severely disabled young girl whose parents opted for oestrogen therapy, a hysterectomy and breast removal – the so-called ‘Ashley treatment’ – in order to reduce her projected adult weight and improve her quality of life. Following a description of the events leading up to the procedure itself, and the worldwide debate which ensued, the main arguments in favour and against the procedures are presented. The paper also critically engages (...)
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  50.  26
    An Epistemologist Looks at the Hot Hand in Sports.Steven D. Hales - 1999 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 26 (1):79-87.
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