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Stephen R. Palmquist [144]Stephen Palmquist [69]
  1.  8
    Kant's Critical Religion.Stephen Palmquist - 2000 - Ashgate Publishing.
    Applying the new perspectival method of interpreting Kant he expounded in earlier works, Palmquist examine a broad range of Kant's philosophical writings to present a fresh view of his thought on theology, religion, and religious experience. He defends a number of innovative theses, including how re.
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  2.  14
    Kant and Mysticism: Critique as the Experience of Baring All in Reason's Light.Stephen Palmquist - 2019 - London: Lexington Books.
    Kant and Mysticism interprets Kant’s early criticism of Swedenborg’s mysticism as the fountainhead of the Critical philosophy. Kantian Critique revolutionizes not only traditional metaphysics, but also our understanding of mysticism: Critical mysticism is a unitive experience that impels us to lay bare all human pretensions to reason’s light.
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  3. Kant’s Religious Argument for the Existence of God.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2009 - Faith and Philosophy 26 (1):3-22.
    After reviewing Kant’s well-known criticisms of the traditional proofs of God’s existence and his preferred moral argument, this paper presents a detailedanalysis of a densely-packed theistic argument in Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason. Humanity’s ultimate moral destiny can be fulfilled only through organized religion, for only by participating in a religious community (or “church”) can we overcome the evil in human nature. Yet we cannot conceive how such a community can even be founded without presupposing God’s existence. Viewing (...)
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  4. Does Kant Reduce Religion to Morality?Stephen Palmquist - 1992 - Kant Studien 83 (2):129-148.
  5. Could Kant’s Jesus Be God?Stephen R. Palmquist - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (4):421-437.
    Although Kant had a high regard for Jesus as a moral teacher, interpreters typically assume that his philosophy disallows belief in Jesus as God. Those who regard Kant as a moral reductionist are especially likely to offer a negative construal of the densely-argued subsection of his 1793 Religion that relates directly to this issue. The recent “affirmative” trend in Kant-scholarship provides the basis for an alternative reading. First, theologians must regard Jesus as human so that belief in Jesus can empower (...)
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  6. Kant's Quasi‐Transcendental Argument for a Necessary and Universal Evil Propensity in Human Nature.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (2):261-297.
    In Part One of Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason, Kant repeatedly refers to a “proof” that human nature has a necessary and universal “evil propensity,” but he provides only obscure hints at its location. Interpreters have failed to identify such an argument in Part One. After examining relevant passages, summarizing recent attempts to reconstruct the argument, and explaining why these do not meet Kant's stated needs, I argue that the elusive proof must have a transcendental form (called quasi‐transcendental (...)
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  7. What is Kantian Gesinnung? On the Priority of Volition over Metaphysics and Psychology in Kant’s Religion.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2015 - Kantian Review 22 (2):235-264.
    Kant’s enigmatic term, “Gesinnung”, baffles many readers of Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason. Detailed analysis of Kant’s theory of Gesinnung, covering all 169 occurrences of cognate words in Religion, clarifies its role in his theories of both general moral decision-making and specifically religious conversion. Whereas the convention of translating “Gesinnung” as “disposition” reinforces a tendency to interpret key Kantian theories metaphysically, and Pluhar’s translation as “attitude” has psychological connotations, this study demonstrates that Kantian Gesinnung is volitional, referring to (...)
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  8.  47
    What is Kantian Gesinnung? On the Priority of Volition over Metaphysics and Psychology in Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2015 - Kantian Review 20 (2):235-264.
    Kants theories of both general moral decision-making and specifically religious conversion. It is argued that Kantian Gesinnung is volitional, referring to a personconvictionberzeugung (). This is confirmed by a detailed analysis of the 169 occurrences of Gesinnung and cognate words in Religion. It contrasts with what is suggested by translating Gesinnung as, which reinforces a tendency to interpret the notion more metaphysically, and also with Pluharattitude’, which has too strongly psychological connotations.
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  9.  58
    Kant’s Model for Building the True Church: Transcending “Might Makes Right” and “Should Makes Good” through the Idea of a Non-Coercive Theocracy.Stephen Palmquist - 2017 - Diametros 54:76-94.
    Kant’s Religion postulates the idea of an ethical community as a necessary requirement for humanity to become good. Few interpreters acknowledge Kant’s claims that realizing this idea requires building a “church” characterized by unity, integrity, freedom, and unchangeability, and that this new form of community is a non-coercive version of theocracy. Traditional theocracy replaces the political state of nature with an ethical state of nature ; non-coercive theocracy transcends this distinction, uniting humanity in a common vision of a divine legislator (...)
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  10.  16
    Humanity’s Moral Trajectory: Rossi on Kantian Critique.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2021 - Philosophia 49 (5):1887-1900.
    After summarizing the content of Philip Rossi’s book, The Ethical Commonwealth in History: Peace-Making as the Moral Vocation of Humanity, I pose two main questions. First, does politics or religion play a more important role in Kant’s philosophy when it comes to the task of ushering humanity to the realization of its ultimate vocation, the establishment of a lasting peace for human society? I argue that Kant portrays politics as a means to a religious end, whereas Rossi tends to reverse (...)
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  11. The Kingdom of God Is at Hand!Stephen Palmquist - 1994 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (4):421-437.
    Could Kant have possibly been the author of this quote? Believe it or not, he did write that! What did he mean?
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  12. Kantian Theocracy as a Non-Political Path to the Politics of Peace.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2016 - Jian Dao 46 (July):155-175.
    Kant is often regarded as one of the founding fathers of modern liberal democracy. His political theory reaches its climax in the ground-breaking work, Perpetual Peace (1795), which sets out the basic framework for a world federation of states united by a system of international law. What is less well known is that two years earlier, in his Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason (1793/1794), Kant had postulated a very different, explicitly religious path to the politics of peace: he (...)
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  13.  15
    How Political Is the Kantian Church?Stephen Palmquist - 2020 - Diametros:1-19.
    Commentators who lament that Kant offers no concrete guidelines for how to set up an ethical community typically neglect Kant’s claim in Religion that the ethical state of nature can transform into an ethical community only by becoming a people of God—i.e., a religious community, or “church.” Kant’s argument culminates by positing four categorial precepts for church organization. The book’s next four sections can be read as elaborating further on each precept, respectively. Kant repeatedly warns against using religious norms to (...)
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  14. Kant’s Ethics of Grace: Perspectival Solutions to the Moral Difficulties with Divine Assistance.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2010 - Journal of Religion 90:530-553.
    Kant’s theory of religion has often been portrayed as leaving no room for grace. Even recent interpreters seeking to affirm Kantian religion find his appeal to grace unconvincing, because they assume the relevant section of Religion (Second Piece, Section One, Subsection C) is an attempt to construct a theology of divine assistance. Yet Kant’s goal in attempting to solve the three "difficulties" with belief in grace is to defend an ethics of grace – i.e., an account of how someone can (...)
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  15. 透視悖論--說謊者的幽默指南.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2013 - In 拒絕再 Hea ── 真理與意義的追尋. Hong Kong: 次文化 [Subculture Limited]. pp. 37-44.
    A Chinese translation of an essay entitled "Paradox in Perspective: A Liar’s Guide to Humor".
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  16. Kant and the New Philosophy of Religion.Chris L. Firestone & Stephen R. Palmquist (eds.) - 2006 - Indiana University Press.
    While earlier work has emphasized Kant’s philosophy of religion as thinly disguised morality, this timely and original reappraisal of Kant’s philosophy of religion incorporates recent scholarship. In this volume, Chris L. Firestone, Stephen R. Palmquist, and the other contributors make a strong case for more specific focus on religious topics in the Kantian corpus. Main themes include the relationship between Kant’s philosophy of religion and his philosophy as a whole, the contemporary relevance of specific issues arising out of Kant’s philosophical (...)
     
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  17. Kant’s Moral Panentheism.Stephen Palmquist - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (1):17-28.
    Although Kant is often interpreted as an Enlightenment Deist, Kant scholars are increasingly recognizing aspects of his philosophy that are more amenable to theism. If Kant regarded himself as a theist, what kind of theist was he? The theological approach that best fits Kant’s model of God is panentheism, whereby God is viewed as a living being pervading the entire natural world, present ‘in’ every part of nature, yet going beyond the physical world. The purpose of Kant’s restrictions on our (...)
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  18.  25
    Kant’s Prudential Theory of Religion: The Necessity of Historical Faith for Moral Empowerment.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2015 - Con-Textos Kantianos 1:57-76.
    Given his emphasis on deontological ethics, Kant is rarely regarded as a friend of prudence. For example, he is often interpreted as an opponent of so-called “historical faiths”. What typically goes unnoticed is that in explaining the legitimate role of historical faiths in the moral development of the human race, Kant appeals explicitly to their prudential status. A careful examination of Kant’s main references to prudence demonstrates that the prudential status of historical faith is the key to understanding both its (...)
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  19.  22
    Could Kant’s Jesus Be God?Stephen R. Palmquist - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (4):421-437.
    Although Kant had a high regard for Jesus as a moral teacher, interpreters typically assume that his philosophy disallows belief in Jesus as God. Those who regard Kant as a moral reductionist are especially likely to offer a negative construal of the densely-argued subsection of his 1793 Religion that relates directly to this issue. The recent “affirmative” trend in Kant-scholarship provides the basis for an alternative reading. First, theologians must regard Jesus as human so that belief in Jesus can empower (...)
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  20. The Kantian Grounding of Einstein’s Worldview.Stephen Palmquist - 2010 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):45-64.
    Recent perspectival interpretations of Kant suggest a way of relating his epistemology to empirical science that makes it plausible to regard Einstein’stheory of relativity as having a Kantian grounding. This first of two articles exploring this topic focuses on how the foregoing hypothesis accounts for variousresonances between Kant’s philosophy and Einstein’s science. The great attention young Einstein paid to Kant in his early intellectual development demonstrates the plausibility of this hypothesis, while certain features of Einstein’s cultural-political context account for his (...)
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  21. A Priori Knowledge in Perspective: Naming, Necessity and the Analytic a Posteriori.Stephen Palmquist - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (2):255 - 282.
    This is the second in a two part series of articles that attempt to clarify the nature and enduring relevance of Kant's concept of a priori knowledge. (For Part I, see below.) In this article I focus mainly on Saul Kripke's critique of Kant, in Naming and Necessity. I argue that Kripke draws attention to a genuine defect in Kant's epistemological framework, but that he used definitions of certain key terms that were quite different from Kant's definitions. When Kripke's definitions (...)
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  22. A Daoist Model For A Kantian Church.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):67-89.
    Although significant differences undoubtedly exist between Daoism and Kant’s philosophy, the two systems also have some noteworthy similarities. After calling attention to a few such parallels and sketching the outlines of Kant’s philosophy of religion, this article focuses on an often-neglected feature of the latter: the four guiding principles of what Kant calls an “invisible church”. Numerous passages from Lao Zi’s classic text, Dao-De-Jing, seem to uphold these same principles, thus suggesting that they can also be interpreted as core features (...)
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  23.  24
    Responses to Critics: What Makes Mysticism Critical?Stephen R. Palmquist - 2021 - Kantian Review 26 (1):137-162.
    After summarizing the content of my book, Kant and Mysticism, I warn against four preliminary misconceptions. The book never argues that Kant viewed himself as a mystic, fully acknowledges Kant’s negative view of mysticism, offers no comprehensive overview of mystical traditions, and aims to initiate a dialogue, not to have the final word. I then respond to the foregoing essays by the five critics.
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  24.  15
    Twelve Basic Philosophical Concepts in Kant and the Compound Yijing.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2015 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 42 (1-2):143-162.
    This is the third in a series of articles that correlates Kant's architectonic with the Yijing's sixty-four hexagrams. Previous articles explained “architectonic” reasoning, introduced four levels of the “Compound Yijing,” consisting of 0 + 4 + 12 + gua, and suggested correlating the fourth level's four sets of twelve to the four “faculties” in Kant's model of the university. This third paper examines the philosophy faculty, assessing whether the twelve proposed gua meaningfully correlate with twelve basic philosophical concepts that Kant (...)
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  25. Works Cited.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2015 - In Comprehensive Commentary on Kant's Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. pp. 537–551.
    The prelims comprise: Half‐Title Page Title Page Copyright Page Dedication Page Table of Contents Preface Acknowledgments Abbreviations.
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  26.  37
    Kant's system of perspectives.Stephen Palmquist - unknown
  27.  17
    Kant's Quasi‐Transcendental Argument for a Necessary and Universal Evil Propensity in Human Nature.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (2):261-297.
    In Part One of Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason, Kant repeatedly refers to a “proof” that human nature has a necessary and universal “evil propensity,” but he provides only obscure hints at its location. Interpreters have failed to identify such an argument in Part One. After examining relevant passages, summarizing recent attempts to reconstruct the argument, and explaining why these do not meet Kant's stated needs, I argue that the elusive proof must have a transcendental form (called quasi‐transcendental (...)
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  28.  8
    Comprehensive commentary on Kant's Religion within the bounds of bare reason.Stephen Palmquist - 2015 - Hoboken: Wiley. Edited by Immanuel Kant.
    Palmquist’s Commentary provides the first definitive clarification on Kant’s Philosophy of Religion in English; it includes the full text of Pluhar’s translation, interspersed with explanations, providing both a detailed overview and an original interpretation of Kant’s work. Offers definitive, sentence-level commentary on Kant’s Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason Presents a thoroughly revised version of Pluhar’s translation of the full text of Kant’s Religion, including detailed notes comparing the translation with the others still in use today Identifies most of (...)
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  29. How'Chinese'Was Kant?Stephen Palmquist - 1996 - The Philosopher 84 (1):3-9.
  30. Three Perspectives on Abraham’s Defense Against Kant’s Charge of Immoral Conduct.Stephen R. Palmquist & Philip McPherson Rudisill - 2009 - Journal of Religion 89 (4):467–497.
    Throughout history no mere mortal has been more revered and esteemed by so many diverse people than Abraham, great patriarch of the three enduring monotheistic religions. Yet Judaism, Christianity and Islam all agree that this man attempted to kill his own, innocent son, an act so dastardly that it would normally be judged both immoral and illegal in any civil society. Surprisingly, the scriptures of these three religious faiths praise Abraham for this very act, justifying it in very different ways, (...)
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  31. To Tell the Truth on Kant and Christianity.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2012 - Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):340-346.
    After reviewing the history of the “affirmative” approach to interpreting Kant’s Religion, I offer four responses to the symposium papers in the previous issue of Faith and Philosophy. First, incorrectly identifying Kant’s two “experiments” leads to misunderstandings of his affirmation of Christianity. Second, Kant’s Critical Religion expounds a thoroughgoing interpretation of these experiments, and was not primarily an attempt to confirm the architectonic introduced in Kant’s System of Perspectives. Third, the surprise positions defended by most symposium contributors render the “affirmative” (...)
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  32.  12
    Twelve basic theological concepts in Kant and the compound yijing.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2020 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 47 (1-2):103-122.
    Journal of Chinese Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  33. Philosophers in the Public Square: A Religious Resolution of Kant’s Conflict of the Faculties.Stephen R. Palmquist & Richard W. Mapplebeckpalmer - 2006 - In Stephen R. Palmquist & Chris L. Firestone (eds.), Kant and the New Philosophy of Religion. Indiana University Press. pp. 230-254.
    This paper is, in part, a report on the conclusions reached at a retreat on Part One of Kant's Conflict of the Faculties, held at the Center for Insight into Philosophic Health, Education, and Renewal, in Mendocino, California. It argues that Kant's distinction between the public and private spheres does not remove but intensifies the philosopher's duty to influence the general public. I conclude with some reflections on how a Kantian philosopher might have a positive influence on religious communities. Includes (...)
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  34.  14
    Chapter 16. Kant’s Lectures on Philosophical Theology – Training-Ground for the Moral Pedagogy of Religion?Stephen R. Palmquist - 2015 - In Robert R. Clewis (ed.), Reading Kant's Lectures. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 365-390.
  35.  19
    Kant’s Prudential Theory of Religion: The Necessity of Historical Faith for Moral Empowerment.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2015 - Con-Textos Kantianos 1:57-76.
    Given his emphasis on deontological ethics, Kant is rarely regarded as a friend of prudence. For example, he is often interpreted as an opponent of so-called “historical faiths”. What typically goes unnoticed is that in explaining the legitimate role of historical faiths in the moral development of the human race, Kant appeals explicitly to their prudential status. A careful examination of Kant’s main references to prudence demonstrates that the prudential status of historical faith is the key to understanding both its (...)
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  36.  84
    Kant’s Critique of Mysticism.Stephen R. Palmquist - 1989 - Philosophy and Theology 3 (4):355-383.
    This is a series of two articles examining Kant’s attitude toward mystical experiences and the relation between his interest in these and his interest in constructing a Critical system of metaphysics.“The Critical Dreams” begins by questioning the traditional division between “Critical” (1770 onwards) and “pre-Critical” periods in Kant’s development. After explaining Kant’s Critical method, his 1766 book, Dreams of a Spirit-Seer... is examined and found to contain all the essential elements of that method. The onlykey element which is missing is (...)
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  37.  20
    Does Tillich Have A Hidden Debt To Kant?Stephen R. Palmquist - 2019 - Journal of Philosophical Theological Research 21 (3):73-88.
    After briefly recounting a strange, quasi-mystical experience I had while first reading Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason, I devote most of this article to exploring various similarities between theories Kant developed and ideas more commonly associated with Paul Tillich. Hints are drawn from Chris Firestone’s book, Kant and Theology at the Boundaries of Reason, which argues that my interpretation of Kant echoes themes in Tillich’s ontology. Among the themes whose Kantian roots I explore are Tillich’s theories of: God as (...)
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  38.  39
    Immanuel Kant: A Christian Philosopher?Stephen Palmquist - 1989 - Faith and Philosophy 6 (1):65-75.
    I begin with a few general suggestions about what it means to be a Christian. I then summarize the new interpretation of Kant as proposing a ‘System of Perspectives,’ which I have set out in greater detail elsewhere. After discussing the important notions of ‘criticism,’ ‘perspective’ and ‘system’ as they operate in Kant’s thought, the bulk of the essay is devoted to an assessment of the theological implications of Kant’s System, I conclude that, contrary to popular opinion, particularly among some (...)
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  39.  54
    Knowledge and Experience. An Examination of the Four Reflective ‘Perspectives’ in Kant’s Critical Philosophy.Stephen Palmquist - 1987 - Kant Studien 78 (1-4):170-200.
    Immediate (non-Reflective) experience must be distinguished from mediate experience (empirical knowledge). Kant's epistemology is based on the "a priori"--"a posteriori" and analytic-Synthetic distinctions. Four classes of knowledge arise out of combining these two distinctions; each corresponds to a 'reflective perspective'--A way of reflecting upon immediate experience. Reflection based on transcendental, Logical, Empirical or practical perspectives gives rise, Respectively, To knowledge which is synthetic "a priori", Analytic "a priori", Synthetic "a posteriori", Or analytic "a posteriori".
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  40. Kant on Euclid: Geometry in Perspective.Stephen R. Palmquist - 1990 - Philosophia Mathematica (1-2):88-113.
    There is a common assumption among philosophers, shared even by many Kant scholars, that Kant had a naive faith in the absolute valid­ity of Euclidean geometry, Aristotelian logic, and Newtonian physics, and that his primary goal in the Critique of Pure Reason was to pro­vide a rational foundation upon which these classical scientific theories could be based. This, it might be thought, is the essence of his attempt to solve the problem which, as he says in a footnote to the (...)
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  41.  9
    Kant on Intuition: Western and Asian Perspectives on Transcendental Idealism.Stephen Palmquist (ed.) - 2018 - New York: Routledge.
    Kant on Intuition: Western and Asian Perspectives on Transcendental Idealism consists of 20 chapters, many of which feature engagements between Kant and various Asian philosophers. Key themes include the nature of human intuition, the status of Kant's idealism/realism, and Kant's notion of an object. Roughly half of the chapters take a stance on the recent conceptualism/non-conceptualism debate. The chapters are organized into four parts, each with five chapters. Part I explores themes relating primarily to the early sections of Kant's first (...)
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  42. A Priori Knowledge in Perspective: (I) Mathematics, Method and Pure Intuition.Stephen Palmquist - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (1):3-22.
    This article is mainly a critique of Philip Kitcher's book, The Nature of Mathematical Knowledge. Four weaknesses in Kitcher's objection to Kant arise out of Kitcher's failure to recognize the perspectival nature of Kant's position. A proper understanding of Kant's theory of mathematics requires awareness of the perspectival nuances implicit in Kant's theory of pure intuition.
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  43. Kant’s Categories and Jung’s Types as Perspectival Maps To Stimulate Insight in a Counseling Session.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2005 - International Journal of Philosophical Practice 3 (1):1-27.
    After coining the term “philopsychy” to describe a “soul-loving” approach to philosophical practice, especially when it welcomes a creative synthesis of philosophy and psychology, this article identifies a system of geometrical figures (or “maps”) that can be used to stimulate reflection on various types of perspectival differences. The maps are part of the author’s previously established mapping methodology, known as the Geometry of Logic. As an illustration of how philosophy can influence the development of psychology, Immanuel Kant’s table of twelve (...)
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  44.  95
    Kantian causality and quantum quarks: the compatibility between quantum mechanics and Kant's phenomenal world.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2013 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 28 (2):283-302.
    Quantum indeterminism seems incompatible with Kant’s defense of causality in his Second Analogy. The Copenhagen interpretation also takes quantum theory as evidence for anti-realism. This article argues that the law of causality, as transcendental, applies only to the world as observable, not to hypothetical (unobservable) objects such as quarks, detectable only by high energy accelerators. Taking Planck’s constant and the speed of light as the lower and upper bounds of observability provides a way of interpreting the observables of quantum mechanics (...)
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  45.  44
    Kantian Causality and Quantum Quarks: The Compatibility between Quantum Mechanics and Kant’s Phenomenal World.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2013 - Theoria 28 (2):283-302.
    Quantum indeterminism seems incompatible with Kant’s defense of causality in his Second Analogy. The Copenhagen interpretation also takes quantum theory as evidence for anti-realism. This first article of a two-part series argues that the law of causality, as transcendental, applies only to the world as observable, not to hypothetical objects such as quarks, detectable only by high energy accelerators. Taking Planck’s constant and the speed of light as the lower and upper bounds of observability provides a way of interpreting the (...)
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  46. Paradox in Perspective: A Liar's Guide to Humor.Stephen R. Palmquist - manuscript
    This is the original English version of a paper that has been published only in Chinese translation. (For the published, Chinese version, see "透視悖論說謊者的幽默指南", in page 37-44 on 拒絕再Hea──真理與意義的追尋) The paper was originally written as a lecture given at the University of Macau in April 2010. The paper argues that humor is essentially a form of paradoxical deception.
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  47. Kant’s Perspectival Solution to the Mind-Body Problem—Or, Why Eliminative Materialists Must Be Kantians.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2016 - Culture and Dialogue 4 (1):194-213.
    Kant’s pre-1770 philosophy responded to the mind-body problem by applying a theory of “physical influx”. His encounter with Swedenborg’s mysticism, however, left him disillusioned with any dualist solution to Descartes’ problem. One of the major goals of the Critical philosophy was to provide a completely new solution to the mind-body problem. Kant’s new solution is “perspectival” in the sense that all Critical theories are perspectival: it acknowledges a deep truth in both of the controversy’s extremes (i.e., what we might nowadays (...)
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  48. Kant and Aristotle on Altruism and the Love Command: Is Universal Friendship Possible.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2017 - Aretè: International Journal of Philosophy, Human & Social Science 2:95-110.
    This article examines the plausibility of regarding altruism in terms of universal friendship. Section 1 frames the question around Aristotle’s ground-breaking philosophy of friendship. For Aristotle, most friendships exist for selfish reasons, motivated by a desire either for pleasure(playmates) or profit (workmates); relatively few friendships are genuine, being motivated by a desire for shared virtue (soulmates). In contrast to this negative answer to the main question, Section 2 examines a possible religious basis for affirming altruism, arising out of the so-called (...)
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  49. Egalitarian Sexism: Kant’s Defense of Monogamy and its Implications for the Future Evolution of Marriage II.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2017 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 3 (7):127-144.
    This second part of a two-part series exploring implications of the natural differences between the sexes for the cultural evolution of marriage considers how the institution of marriage might evolve, if Kant’s reasons for defending monogamy are extended and applied to a future culture. After summarizing the philosophical framework for making cross-cultural ethical assessments that was introduced in Part I and then explaining Kant’s portrayal of marriage as an antidote to the objectifying tendencies of sex, I summarize Kant’s reasons for (...)
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  50. Egalitarian Sexism: A Framework for Assessing Kant’s Evolutionary Theory of Marriage I.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2017 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 1 (7):35–55.
    This first part of a two-part series exploring implications of the natural differences between the sexes for the cultural evolution of marriage assesses whether Kant should be condemned as a sexist due to his various offensive claims about women. Being antithetical to modern-day assumptions regarding the equality of the sexes, Kant’s views seem to contradict his own egalitarian ethics. A philosophical framework for making cross-cultural ethical assessments requires one to assess those in other cultures by their own ethical standards. Sexism (...)
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