22 found
Order:
  1.  85
    Scientific and religious approaches to morality: An alternative to mutual anathemas.Stephen J. Pope - 2013 - Zygon 48 (1):20-34.
    Many people today believe that scientific and religious approaches to morality are mutually incompatible. Militant secularists claim scientific backing for their claim that the evolution of morality discredits religious conceptions of ethics. Some of their opponents respond with unhelpful apologetics based on fundamentalist views of revelation. This article attempts to provide an alternative option. It argues that public discussion has been excessively influenced by polemics generated by the new atheists. Religious writers have too often resorted to overly simplistic arguments rooted (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2. Overview of the ethics of Thomas Aquinas.Stephen J. Pope - 2002 - In The Ethics of Aquinas. pp. 30--52.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  3.  59
    Aquinas on almsgiving, justice and charity: An interpretation and reassessment.Stephen J. Pope - 1991 - Heythrop Journal 32 (2):167–191.
  4.  6
    E. O. Wilson as Moralist.Stephen J. Pope - 2001 - Zygon 36 (2):233-238.
    E. O. Wilson offers descriptive and normative analyses of morality. Regarding sciencee as the only proper basis for explaining and developing morality, he has not sufficiently accounted for the complexity of human conduct in this arena. Wilson's account of evolved proclivities, however, indicates important features of human nature that moral theorists ignore at their peril.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Agape.Stephen J. Pope - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  22
    Christocentric Exemplarism and the Imitation of Jesus.Stephen J. Pope - 2018 - New Blackfriars 101 (1093):301-310.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  11
    Catholic Social Thought and Civic Responsibility.Stephen J. Pope - 2002 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 12 (1):1-25.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Descriptive and Normative Uses of Evolutionary Theory.Stephen J. Pope - 1996 - In Lisa Sowle Cahill & James F. Childress (eds.), Christian Ethics: Problems and Prospects. Pilgrim Press. pp. 166--82.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  41
    E. O. Wilson as moralist.Stephen J. Pope - 2000 - Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):233-238.
  10.  39
    E. O. Wilson as Moralist.Stephen J. Pope - 2001 - Zygon 36 (2):233-238.
    E. O. Wilson offers descriptive and normative analyses of morality. Regarding sciencee as the only proper basis for explaining and developing morality, he has not sufficiently accounted for the complexity of human conduct in this arena. Wilson's account of evolved proclivities, however, indicates important features of human nature that moral theorists ignore at their peril.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  13
    Faithful and Compassionate Intelligence.Stephen J. Pope - 2000 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 11 (1):17-26.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  50
    Familial Love and Human Nature.Stephen J. Pope - 1995 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 69 (3):447-469.
  13.  9
    Human Evolution and Christian Ethics.Stephen J. Pope - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Can the origins of morality be explained entirely in evolutionary terms? If so, what are the implications for Christian moral theology and ethics? Is the latter redundant, as socio-biologists often assert? Stephen Pope argues that theologians need to engage with evolutionary theory rather than ignoring it. He shows that our growing knowledge of human evolution is compatible with Christian faith and morality, provided that the former is not interpreted reductionistically and the latter is not understood in fundamentalist ways. Christian ethics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  13
    Love, moral values and proportionalism: A response to Garth Hallett.Stephen J. Pope - 1990 - Heythrop Journal 31 (2):199–205.
  15.  58
    Neither Enemy Nor Friend: Nature as Creation in the Theology of Saint Thomas Aquinas.Stephen J. Pope - 1997 - Zygon 32 (2):219-230.
    This paper traces three paradigmatic responses to the presence of evil in nature. Thomas Henry Huxley depicts nature as the enemy of humanity that morality combats “at every step.” Henry Drummond views nature as benevolent, a friend of humanity, and the ultimate basis for morality. The paper argues that a third view, that of Thomas Aquinas, regards nature as creation, capable of being neither enemy nor friend of humanity but rather the context within which relations of enmity or friendship develop (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Natural law and Christian ethics.Stephen J. Pope - 2001 - In Robin Gill (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  59
    Sociobiology and Human Nature: A Perspective from Catholic Theology.Stephen J. Pope - 1998 - Zygon 33 (2):275-291.
    This paper addresses a nonspecialist audience on how sociobiological accounts of human nature might be relevant to Christian theology. I begin with some confessional remarks to clarify what I mean by Christian theology and how I understand it to be related to science. I indicate briefly why sociobiology might be of interest to theology and then move on to sketch some ways in which sociobiology might relate to theological ethics. My basic point is that sociobiology is directly relevant to theological (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  54
    The Evolutionary Roots of Morality in Theological Perspective.Stephen J. Pope - 1998 - Zygon 33 (4):545-556.
    Theological ethics can interpret the relation between evolution and morality in at least three ways. The reductionist approach holds that morality emerges because it is adaptive. The independent approach maintains that morality develops without registering the influence of evolution. Finally, the interdependence position holds that morality reflects the influence of evolution to the extent that the latter shapes human emotional capacities and predispositions, for example, those regarding reciprocity and kin preference. The third approach is more suitable for theological ethics, which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  8
    The Use of Psychology in Ethics.Stephen J. Pope & Michael A. Wahl - 2018 - Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences 5 (2):181.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  87
    E. O. Wilson, Stephen Pope, and Philip Hefner: A Conversation.Edward O. Wilson, Stephen J. Pope & Philip Hefner - 2001 - Zygon 36 (2):249-253.
    The following represents excerpts from a transcription of the informal discussion that ensued after Stephen Pope and Philip Hefner delivered the preceding papers at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., 20 February 2000. These excerpts are presented with a minimum of editing, to preserve the extemporaneous, informal, oral character of the conversation. The excerpts end with a fragmentary comment by E. O. Wilson, conveying the spirit of the actual conversation, which was (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  55
    Scientific and Natural Law Analyses of Homosexuality: A Methodological Study.Stephen J. Pope - 1997 - Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (1):89-126.
    Natural law ethicists have typically argued that homosexual activity is immoral because it is "unnatural." Recent scientific information and theories, on the other hand, have been used to challenge this description and to provide moral backing for sexual activity among homosexuals. This paper traces some of the recent scientific claims about possible natural bases of homosexuality and then examines what significance these claims might have for several contemporary forms of natural law ethics. It argues that natural law assessments ought to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22.  3
    E. O. Wilson as moralist. [REVIEW]Stephen J. Pope - 2000 - Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):291-297.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark