6 found
Order:
See also
Stephen Louw
University of the Witwatersrand (PhD)
  1. Dementia: Mind, Meaning, and the Person.Julian C. Hughes, Stephen J. Louw & Steven R. Sabat (eds.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Dementia is an illness that raises important questions about our own attitudes to illness and aging. It also raises very important issues beyond the bounds of dementia to do with how we think of ourselves as people--fundamental questions about personal identity. Is the person with dementia the same person he or she was before? Is the individual with dementia a person at all? In a striking way, dementia seems to threaten the very existence of the self.LThis book brings together philosophers (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  2.  31
    Clinical Research Without Consent in Adults in the Emergency Setting: A Review of Patient and Public Views. [REVIEW]Jan Lecouturier, Helen Rodgers, Gary A. Ford, Tim Rapley, Lynne Stobbart, Stephen J. Louw & Madeleine J. Murtagh - 2008 - BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):9.
    In emergency research, obtaining informed consent can be problematic. Research to develop and improve treatments for patients admitted to hospital with life-threatening and debilitating conditions is much needed yet the issue of research without consent (RWC) raises concerns about unethical practices and the loss of individual autonomy. Consistent with the policy and practice turn towards greater patient and public involvement in health care decisions, in the US, Canada and EU, guidelines and legislation implemented to protect patients and facilitate acute research (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  3.  87
    Value Judgements and Conceptual Tensions: Decision-Making in Relation to Hospital Discharge for People with Dementia.Helen Greener, Marie Poole, Charlotte Emmett, John Bond, Stephen J. Louw & Julian C. Hughes - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (4):166-174.
    We reflect, using a vignette, on conceptual tensions and the value judgements that lie behind difficult decisions about whether or not the older person with dementia should return home or move into long-term care following hospital admission. The paper seeks, first, to expose some of the difficulties arising from the assessment of residence capacity, particularly around the nature of evaluative judgements and conceptual tensions inherent in the legal approach to capacity. Secondly, we consider the assessment of best interests around place (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  13
    Nudging the Older Person Into Care: An End to the Dilemma?Julian C. Hughes, Marie Poole & Stephen J. Louw - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):34 - 36.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Ethical Issues and Tagging in Dementia: A Survey.Julian C. Hughes, Jane Newby, Stephen J. Louw, Gill Campbell & Jane L. Hutton - 2009 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 3 (1):4.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  16
    The Challenges of Seeking Consent From Adults to Participate in Acute Research Studies.Jan Lecouturier, Lynne Stobbart, Madeleine J. Murtagh, Gary A. Ford, Tim Rapley, Stephen J. Louw & Helen Rodgers - 2010 - Clinical Ethics 5 (2):73-76.
    In this paper the current legislative landscape and the challenges researchers face in obtaining informed consent in acute situations are explored. In such situations, some current guidelines can be difficult or impossible to apply. Capacity should be formally assessed before consent is sought to ensure that vulnerable persons are neither inappropriately recruited to a study nor denied the opportunity to participate. However, there is little guidance in current legislation as to how this should be achieved. When the patient is considered (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark