Results for 'Stephen Cranefield'

998 found
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  1.  36
    Identifying prohibition norms in agent societies.Bastin Tony Roy Savarimuthu, Stephen Cranefield, Maryam A. Purvis & Martin K. Purvis - 2013 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 21 (1):1 - 46.
    In normative multi-agent systems, the question of “how an agent identifies norms in an open agent society” has not received much attention. This paper aims at addressing this question. To this end, this paper proposes an architecture for norm identification for an agent. The architecture is based on observation of interactions between agents. This architecture enables an autonomous agent to identify prohibition norms in a society using the prohibition norm identification (PNI) algorithm. The PNI algorithm uses association rule mining, a (...)
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  2.  48
    Wonderful Life; The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History.Stephen Jay Gould - 1992 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 23 (2):359-360.
  3. The Biophilia Hypothesis.Stephen R. Kellert & Edward O. Wilson - 1995 - Island Press.
    "Biophilia" is the term coined by Edward O. Wilson to describe what he believes is humanity's innate affinity for the natural world. In his landmark book Biophilia, he examined how our tendency to focus on life and lifelike processes might be a biologically based need, integral to our development as individuals and as a species. That idea has caught the imagination of diverse thinkers. The Biophilia Hypothesis brings together the views of some of the most creative scientists of our time, (...)
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  4. Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade.Stephen Wilkinson - 2003 - Routledge.
    _Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade _explores the philosophical and practical issues raised by activities such as surrogacy and organ trafficking. Stephen Wilkinson asks what is it that makes some commercial uses of the body controversial, whether the arguments against commercial exploitation stand up, and whether legislation outlawing such practices is really justified. In Part One Wilkinson explains and analyses some of the notoriously slippery concepts used in the body commodification debate, including exploitation, harm (...)
  5. Education Reform: A Critical and Post-Structural Approach.Stephen J. Ball - 1995 - British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (2):221-223.
  6.  62
    On Being in the World : Wittgenstein and Heidegger on Seeing Aspects.Stephen Mulhall - 1990 - New York: Routledge.
    _On Being in the World_, first published in 1990, illumines a neglected but important area of Wittgenstein’s philosophy, revealing its pertinence to the central concerns of contemporary analytic philosophy. The starting point is the idea of ‘continuous aspect perception’, which connects Wittgenstein’s treatment of certain issues relating to aesthetics with fundamental questions in the philosophy of psychology. Professor Mulhall indicates parallels between Wittgenstein’s interests and Heidegger’s _Being and Time_, demonstrating that Wittgenstein’s investigation of aspect perception is designed to cast light (...)
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  7.  36
    Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience.Stephen Maitzen & William P. Alston - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (3):430.
  8. The Moral Fixed Points: Reply to Cuneo and Shafer-Landau.Stephen Ingram - 2015 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (1):1-5.
  9.  16
    Kant and Mysticism: Critique as the Experience of Baring All in Reason's Light.Stephen Palmquist - 2019 - London: Lexington Books.
    Kant and Mysticism interprets Kant’s early criticism of Swedenborg’s mysticism as the fountainhead of the Critical philosophy. Kantian Critique revolutionizes not only traditional metaphysics, but also our understanding of mysticism: Critical mysticism is a unitive experience that impels us to lay bare all human pretensions to reason’s light.
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  10. Heidegger and 'Being and Time'.Stephen Mulhall - 1997 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 59 (1):177-177.
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  11.  10
    Hume's Enlightenment Tract: The Unity and Purpose of an Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.Stephen Buckle - 2001 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK.
    Hume's Enlightenment Tract is the first full book-length study for forty years of David Hume's Enquiry concerning Human Understanding. The Enquiry has, contrary to its author's expressed wishes, long lived in the shadow of its predecessor, A Treatise of Human Nature. Stephen Buckle presents the Enquiry in a fresh light, and aims to raise it to its rightful position in Hume's work and in the history of philosophy. He argues that the Enquiry is not, as so often assumed, a (...)
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  12. Term limits.Stephen Neale - 1993 - Philosophical Perspectives 7:89-123.
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  13. Monism: The One True Logic.Stephen Read - 2006 - In David DeVidi & Tim Kenyon (eds.), A Logical Approach to Philosophy: Essays in Memory of Graham Solomon. Dordrecht, Netherland: Springer.
    Logical pluralism is the claim that different accounts of validity can be equally correct. Beall and Restall have recently defended this position. Validity is a matter of truth-preservation over cases, they say: the conclusion should be true in every case in which the premises are true. Each logic specifies a class of cases, but differs over which cases should be considered. I show that this account of logic is incoherent. Validity indeed is truth-preservation, provided this is properly understood. Once understood, (...)
     
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  14.  36
    Conscious identification: Where do you draw the line?Stephen J. Lupker - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):37-38.
  15.  47
    Returning the tables: language affects spatial reasoning.Stephen C. Levinson, Sotaro Kita, Daniel B. M. Haun & Björn H. Rasch - 2002 - Cognition 84 (2):155-188.
  16. One Ought Too Many.Stephen Finlay & Justin Snedegar - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (1):102-124.
    Some philosophers hold that „ought‟ is ambiguous between a sense expressing a propositional operator and a sense expressing a relation between an agent and an action. We defend the opposing view that „ought‟ always expresses a propositional operator against Mark Schroeder‟s recent objections that it cannot adequately accommodate an ambiguity in „ought‟ sentences between evaluative and deliberative readings, predicting readings of sentences that are not actually available. We show how adopting an independently well-motivated contrastivist semantics for „ought‟, according to which (...)
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  17.  17
    Is Executive Function the Universal Acid?Stephen J. Morse - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (2):299-318.
    This essay responds to Hirstein, Sifferd and Fagan’s book, Responsible Brains, which claims that executive function is the guiding mechanism that supports both responsible agency and the necessity for some excuses. In contrast, I suggest that executive function is not the universal acid and the neuroscience at present contributes almost nothing to the necessary psychological level of explanation and analysis. To the extent neuroscience can be useful, it is virtually entirely dependent on well-validated psychology to correlate with the neuroscientific variables (...)
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  18. A Theory of Property.Stephen R. Munzer - 1991 - Mind 100 (2):300-302.
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  19. Climate Ethics in a Dark and Dangerous Time.Stephen M. Gardiner - 2017 - Ethics 127 (2):430-465.
    A critical study of two recent books in climate ethics by Dale Jamieson (Reason in a Dark Time, Oxford 2014), and Darrel Moellendorf (The Moral and Political Challenges of Climate Change, Cambridge 2014).
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  20.  93
    Tools from evolutionary biology shed new light on the diversification of languages.Stephen C. Levinson & Russell D. Gray - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (3):167-173.
  21. Pragmatism and Binding.Stephen Neale - 2004 - In Zoltán Gendler Szabó (ed.), Semantics Versus Pragmatics. Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK. pp. 165-285.
    Names, descriptions, and demonstratives raise well-known logical, ontological, and epistemological problems. Perhaps less well known, amongst philosophers at least, are the ways in which some of these problems not only recur with pronouns but also cross-cut further problems exposed by the study in generative linguistics of morpho-syntactic constraints on interpretation. These problems will be my primary concern here, but I want to address them within a general picture of interpretation that is required if wires are not to be crossed. That (...)
     
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  22. A new argument against compatibilism.Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum - 2013 - Analysis (1):ant095.
    If one’s solution to the free will problem is in terms of real causal powers of agents then one ought to be an incompatibilist. Some premises are contentious but the following new argument for incompatibilism is advanced: 1. If causal determinism is true, all events are necessitated2. If all events are necessitated, then there are no powers3. Free will consists in the exercise of an agent’s powersTherefore, if causal determinism is true, there is no free will; which is to say (...)
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  23.  58
    Origins of Recursive Function Theory.Stephen C. Kleene & Martin Davis - 1990 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (1):348-350.
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  24.  7
    Borrowed Knowledge: Chaos Theory and the Challenge of Learning Across Disciplines.Stephen H. Kellert - 2008 - University of Chicago Press.
    What happens to scientific knowledge when researchers outside the natural sciences bring elements of the latest trend across disciplinary boundaries for their own purposes? Researchers in fields from anthropology to family therapy and traffic planning employ the concepts, methods, and results of chaos theory to harness the disciplinary prestige of the natural sciences, to motivate methodological change or conceptual reorganization within their home discipline, and to justify public policies and aesthetic judgments. Using the recent explosion in the use of chaos (...)
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  25.  13
    An Auseinandersetzung with David W. Johnson’s Watsuji on Nature: Japanese Philosophy in the Wake of Heidegger.Stephen G. Lofts - 2024 - Philosophy Today 68 (1):211-217.
  26.  18
    Merleau-Ponty.Stephen Priest - 1998 - New York: Routledge.
    Maurice Merleau-Ponty is known and celebrated as a renowned phenomenologist and is considered a key figure in the existentialist movement. In this wide-ranging and penetrative study, Stephen Priest engages Merleau-Ponty across the full range of his philosophical thought. He considers Merleau-Ponty's writings on the problems of the body, perception, space, time, subjectivity, freedom, language, other minds, physical objects, art and being. Priest addresses Merleau-Ponty's thought in connection with Hegel, Husserl, Heidegger and Sartre. He uses clear and direct language to (...)
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  27. In Defence of Transmission.Stephen Wright - 2015 - Episteme 12 (1):13-28.
    According totransmissiontheories of testimony, a listener's belief in a speaker's testimony can be supported by the speaker's justification for what she says. The most powerful objection to transmission theories is Jennifer Lackey'spersistent believercase. I argue that important features about the epistemology of testimony reveal how transmission theories can account for Lackey's case. Specifically, I argue that transmission theorists should hold that transmission happens only if a listener believes a speaker's testimony based on the presumption that the speaker has justification for (...)
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  28.  51
    Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth: A Brief History and Philosophy.Stephen Phillips - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    For serious yoga practitioners curious to know the ancient origins of the art, Stephen Phillips, a professional philosopher and sanskritist with a long-standing personal practice, lays out the philosophies of action, knowledge, and devotion as well as the processes of meditation, reasoning, and self-analysis that formed the basis of yoga in ancient and classical India and continue to shape it today. In discussing yoga's fundamental commitments, Phillips explores traditional teachings of hatha yoga, karma yoga, _bhakti_ yoga, and tantra, and (...)
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  29. Responsibility for necessities.Stephen Kearns - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 155 (2):307-324.
    It is commonly held that no one can be morally responsible for a necessary truth. In this paper, I will provide various examples that cast doubt on this idea. I also show that one popular argument for the incompatibility of moral responsibility and determinism (van Inwagen’s Direct Argument) fails given my examples.
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  30. .Stephen Buckle - unknown
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  31. Descartes and Augustine.Stephen Menn - 1998 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 192 (4):455-457.
     
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  32. On Monsters: an unnatural history of our worst fears.Stephen T. Asma - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Hailed as "a feast" (Washington Post) and "a modern-day bestiary" (The New Yorker), Stephen Asma's On Monsters is a wide-ranging cultural and conceptual history of monsters--how they have evolved over time, what functions they have served for us, and what shapes they are likely to take in the future. Beginning at the time of Alexander the Great, the monsters come fast and furious--Behemoth and Leviathan, Gog and Magog, Satan and his demons, Grendel and Frankenstein, circus freaks and headless children, (...)
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  33. Risk, harm, interests, and rights.Stephen Perry - 2007 - In Tim Lewens (ed.), Risk: Philosophical Perspectives. New York: Routledge.
     
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  34.  18
    Postmodern Marketing.Stephen Brown - 1999 - Thomson Learning.
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  35.  69
    Heavy Hands, Magic, and Scene-Reading Traps.Stephen Neale - 2007 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 3 (2):77-132.
    This is one of a series of articles in which I examine errors that philosophers of language may be led to make if already prone to exaggerating the rôle compositional semantics can play in explaining how we communicate, whether by expressing propositions with our words or by merely implying them. In the present article, I am concerned less with “pragmatic contributions” to the propositions we express—contributions some philosophers seem rather desperate to deny the existence or ubiquity of—than I am with (...)
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  36.  14
    The Philosophy Files.Stephen Law - 2002 - Orion Children's Books.
    Is there a God, should I eat meat, where does the universe come from, could I live for ever as a robot? These are the big questions readers will be wrestling with in this thoroughly enjoyable book. Dip into any chapter and you will find lively scenarios and dialogues to take you through philosophical puzzles ancient and modern, involving virtual reality, science fiction and a host of characters from this and other planets. The text is interspersed on every page with (...)
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  37. Hart's Methodological Positivism.Stephen R. Perry - 2000 - In Jules L. Coleman (ed.), Hart's Postscript: Essays on the Postscript to `the Concept of Law'. New York: Oxford University Press UK.
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  38.  19
    The A to Z of Existentialism.Stephen Michelman - 2010 - Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.
    The A to Z of Existentialism explains the central claims of existentialist philosophy and the contexts in which it developed into one of the most influential intellectual trends of the 20th century. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and more than 300 cross-referenced dictionary entries offering clear, accessible accounts of the life and thought of major existentialists like Jean-Paul Sartre, Martin Heidegger, Martin Buber, Karl Jaspers, Gabriel Marcel, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, (...)
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  39. Moral and legal responsibility and the new neuroscience.Stephen J. Morse - 2005 - In Judy Illes (ed.), Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oxford University Press UK.
     
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  40. Act and Rule Utilitariansim.Stephen Nathanson - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  41.  50
    Knowledge’s Boundary Problem.Stephen Hetherington - 2006 - Synthese 150 (1):41-56.
    Where is the justificatory boundary between a true belief's not being knowledge and its being knowledge? Even if we put to one side the Gettier problem, this remains a fundamental epistemological question, concerning as it does the matter of whether we can provide some significant defence of the usual epistemological assumption that a belief is knowledge only if it is well justified. But can that question be answered non-arbitrarily? BonJour believes that it cannot be -- and that epistemology should therefore (...)
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  42. Medieval theories: properties of terms.Stephen Read - 2002 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 1:1-13.
  43. Picturing the human (body and soul): A reading of Blade Runner.Stephen Mulhall - unknown
     
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  44.  7
    God, Religion and Reality.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2017
    "In this engaging study Professor Clark sets out to show that there are good philosophical reasons for theism, and Christian theism in particular. He travels the breadth of our intellectual engagement with the world, from ethics to scientific knowledge, and his journey is vigorously argued, fresh, lively and readable. He explores the assumptions which underpin our philosophical and everyday thinking alike, examines the construction of the arguments used to support them, and tests the sturdiness and the makeup of their props (...)
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  45. Objectivity: a very short introduction.Stephen Gaukroger - 2012 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Objectivity is both an essential and elusive philosophical concept. This Very Short Introduction explores the theoretical and practical problems raised by objectivity, and also deals with the way in which particular understandings of objectivity impinge on social research, science, and art.
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  46.  18
    Descriptive Pronouns and Donkey Anaphora.Stephen Neale - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):113-150.
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  47.  14
    The Routledge Guidebook to Heidegger's Being and Time.Stephen Mulhall - 2013 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Stephen Mulhall.
    _The Routledge Guidebook to Heidegger’s Being and Time_ examines the work of one of the most controversial thinkers of the twentieth century. Heidegger’s writings are notoriously difficult, requiring careful reading. This book analyses his first major publication, _Being and Time_, which to this day remains his most influential work. The Routledge Guidebook to Heidegger’s Being and Time explores: The context of Heidegger’s work and the background to his writing Each separate part of the text in relation to its goals, meanings (...)
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  48. Human Understanding. Vol. I.Stephen Toulmin - 1973 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 35 (2):414-415.
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  49. Term limits revisited.Stephen Neale - 2008 - Philosophical Perspectives 22 (1):375-442.
  50.  18
    Choreographic cognition: the time-course and phenomenology of creating a dance.Stephen Malloch, Catherine Stevens, Shirley McKechnie & Nicole Steven - 2003 - Pragmatics and Cognition 11 (2):297-326.
    The process of inception, development and refinement during the creation of a new dance work is described and explored. The account is based on annotated video of the professional choreographer and dancers as they create and sequence new movement material, as well as weekly journal entries made by one of the dancers. A 24-week chronology is reported. We analyse the choreographic process using the Geneplore model of creative cognition as an organising framework and identify generative and exploratory processes including problem (...)
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