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  1.  35
    Signaling Sustainability Leadership: Empirical Evidence of the Value of DJSI Membership. [REVIEW]Michael Robinson, Anne Kleffner & Stephanie Bertels - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (3):493-505.
    We explore the relationship between corporate sustainability, reputation, and firm value by asking whether signaling sustainability leadership through membership on a recognized sustainability index is value generating. Increasingly, stakeholders are demanding that firms demonstrate their commitment to sustainability. One signal that companies can send to stakeholders to indicate that they are sustainability leaders is membership on a recognized “best in class” sustainability index. This article explores both the short-term and the intermediary impact on North American firms of being included or (...)
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  2.  20
    A Responsive Approach to Organizational Misconduct in Advance.Stephanie Bertels, Michael Cody & Simon Pek - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (3):343-370.
    In this article, we examine how regulators, prosecutors, and courts might support and encourage the efforts of organizations to not only reintegrate after misconduct but also to improve their conduct in a way that reduces their likelihood of re-offense. We explore a novel experiment in creative sentencing in Alberta Canada that aimed to try to change the behaviour of an industry by publicly airing the root causes of a failure of one the industry’s leaders. Drawing on this case and prior (...)
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  3.  25
    Leaders and Laggards: The Influence of Competing Logics on Corporate Environmental Action.Irene M. Herremans, M. Sandy Herschovis & Stephanie Bertels - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):449-472.
    We study the sources of resistance to change among firms in the Canadian petroleum industry in response to a shift in societal level logics related to corporate environmental performance. Despite challenges to its legitimacy as a result of poor environmental performance, the Canadian petroleum industry was divided as to how to respond, with some members ignoring the concerns and resisting change (i.e., laggards) while others took action to ensure continued legitimacy (i.e., leaders). We examine why organizations within the same institutional (...)
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  4. 2006 Reviewer Acknowledgement.Bindu Arya, Ruth Aguilera, Ken Aupperle, Kristin Backhaus, Deborah Balser, Tina Bansla, Barbara Bartkus, Melissa Baucus, Shawn Berman & Stephanie Bertels - 2007 - Business and Society 46 (1):4-6.
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  5.  21
    Who Sits at the Table? A New Approach to Stakeholder Selection.Stephanie Bertels & Harrie Vredenburg - 2005 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:293-297.
    When assembling a collaborative initiative, how do you select the appropriate stakeholders to promote collaborative success? We examine the limitations of thestakeholder theory approach to resolving this issue. Instead, we argue that the domain-based perspective and the notion of requisite variety both offer worthwhile perspectives on the issue of participant selection. Combining these perspectives, we pave the way for a theory of participant selection that focuses on evaluating collaborative resources and capabilities at the individual, organizational and domain levels.
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  6.  13
    2005 Reviewer Acknowledgment.Bindu Arya, Ken Aupperle, Kristin Backhaus, Deborah Balser, Barbara Bartkus, Melissa Baucus, Shawn Berman, Stephanie Bertels, Janice Black & Leeora Black - 2006 - Business and Society 45 (1):5-6.
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