Results for 'Spatial language'

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  1.  68
    Spatial Language of Young Children During Block Play in Kindergartens in Urban China.Xiaoli Yang & Yuejuan Pan - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Spatial language is an important predictor of spatial skills and might be inspired by peer interaction and goal-oriented building behaviors during block play. The present study investigated the frequency, type and level of children’s spatial language during block play and their associations with the level of block play by observing 228 young children in classrooms equipped with unit blocks and allowing free play on a daily basis. The findings showed that during block play, young children (...)
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  2.  32
    Grounding spatial language in perception: an empirical and computational investigation.Terry Regier & Laura A. Carlson - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (2):273.
  3.  50
    Object Orientation Affects Spatial Language Comprehension.Michele Burigo & Simona Sacchi - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (8):1471-1492.
    Typical spatial descriptions, such as “The car is in front of the house,” describe the position of a located object (LO; e.g., the car) in space relative to a reference object (RO) whose location is known (e.g., the house). The orientation of the RO affects spatial language comprehension via the reference frame selection process. However, the effects of the LO's orientation on spatial language have not received great attention. This study explores whether the pure geometric (...)
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  4.  38
    Spatial Language and the Embedded Listener Model in Parents’ Input to Children.Katrina Ferrara, Malena Silva, Colin Wilson & Barbara Landau - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8):1877-1910.
    Language is a collaborative act: To communicate successfully, speakers must generate utterances that are not only semantically valid but also sensitive to the knowledge state of the listener. Such sensitivity could reflect the use of an “embedded listener model,” where speakers choose utterances on the basis of an internal model of the listener's conceptual and linguistic knowledge. In this study, we ask whether parents’ spatial descriptions incorporate an embedded listener model that reflects their children's understanding of spatial (...)
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  5. Spatial language and spatial representation.William G. Hayward & Michael J. Tarr - 1995 - Cognition 55 (1):39-84.
  6. Spatial language and spatial representation: a cross-linguistic comparison.Edward Munnich, Barbara Landau & Barbara Anne Dosher - 2001 - Cognition 81 (3):171-208.
  7.  42
    Spatial language facilitates spatial cognition: Evidence from children who lack language input.Dedre Gentner, Asli Özyürek, Özge Gürcanli & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):318-330.
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  8.  75
    “What” and “where” in spatial language and spatial cognition.Barbara Landau & Ray Jackendoff - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):217-238.
    Fundamental to spatial knowledge in all species are the representations underlying object recognition, object search, and navigation through space. But what sets humans apart from other species is our ability to express spatial experience through language. This target article explores the language ofobjectsandplaces, asking what geometric properties are preserved in the representations underlying object nouns and spatial prepositions in English. Evidence from these two aspects of language suggests there are significant differences in the geometric (...)
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  9.  37
    Spatial language as a window on representations of three-dimensional space.Kevin J. Holmes & Phillip Wolff - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):550-551.
    Recent research investigating the language–thought interface in the spatial domain points to representations of the horizontal and vertical dimensions that closely resemble those posited by Jeffery et al. However, the findings suggest that such representations, rather than being tied to navigation, may instead reflect more general properties of the perception of space.
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  10. Spatial language.Stephen C. Levinson - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
  11. Spatial language and landmark use: can 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds find the middle.Nina Simms & Dedre Gentner - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 191--196.
     
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  12.  41
    Is spatial language a special case?Dan I. Slobin - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):249-251.
  13.  23
    What Does Children's Spatial Language Reveal About Spatial Concepts? Evidence From the Use of Containment Expressions.Megan Johanson & Anna Papafragou - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (5):881-910.
    Children's overextensions of spatial language are often taken to reveal spatial biases. However, it is unclear whether extension patterns should be attributed to children's overly general spatial concepts or to a narrower notion of conceptual similarity allowing metaphor‐like extensions. We describe a previously unnoticed extension of spatial expressions and use a novel method to determine its origins. English‐ and Greek‐speaking 4‐ and 5‐year‐olds used containment expressions (e.g., English into, Greek mesa) for events where an object (...)
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  14.  14
    Demonstratives in Spatial Language and Social Interaction: An Interdisciplinary Review.Holger Diessel & Kenny R. Coventry - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    This paper offers a review of research on demonstratives from an interdisciplinary perspective. In particular, we consider the role of demonstratives in current research on language universals, language evolution, language acquisition, multimodal communication, signed language, language and perception, language in interaction, spatial imagery, and discourse processing. Traditionally, demonstratives are analyzed as a particular class of spatial deictics. Yet, a number of recent studies have argued that space is largely irrelevant to deixis and (...)
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  15. Speech and Gesture in Spatial Language and Cognition Among the Yucatec Mayas.Olivier Le Guen - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (5):905-938.
    In previous analyses of the influence of language on cognition, speech has been the main channel examined. In studies conducted among Yucatec Mayas, efforts to determine the preferred frame of reference in use in this community have failed to reach an agreement (Bohnemeyer & Stolz, 2006; Levinson, 2003 vs. Le Guen, 2006, 2009). This paper argues for a multimodal analysis of language that encompasses gesture as well as speech, and shows that the preferred frame of reference in Yucatec (...)
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  16. Attention and spatial language.L. A. Carlson & G. D. Logan - 2005 - In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press. pp. 330--336.
  17.  43
    Whence and whither in spatial language and spatial cognition?Barbara Landau & Ray Jackendoff - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):255-265.
  18.  25
    Visual imagery and visual-spatial language: Enhanced imagery abilities in deaf and hearing ASL signers.Karen Emmorey, Stephen M. Kosslyn & Ursula Bellugi - 1993 - Cognition 46 (2):139-181.
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  19.  11
    Inter-process relations in spatial language: Feedback and graded compatibility.Holger Schultheis & Laura A. Carlson - 2018 - Cognition 176 (C):140-158.
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  20.  46
    The effects of spatial language on spatial representation: Setting some boundaries.Edward Munnich & Barbara Landau - 2003 - In Dedre Getner & Susan Goldin-Meadow (eds.), Language in Mind: Advances in the Study of Language and Thought. MIT Press. pp. 113--155.
  21.  20
    Update on “What” and “Where” in Spatial Language: A New Division of Labor for Spatial Terms.Barbara Landau - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S2):321-350.
    In this article, I revisit Landau and Jackendoff's () paper, “What and where in spatial language and spatial cognition,” proposing a friendly amendment and reformulation. The original paper emphasized the distinct geometries that are engaged when objects are represented as members of object kinds, versus when they are represented as figure and ground in spatial expressions. We provided empirical and theoretical arguments for the link between these distinct representations in spatial language and their accompanying (...)
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  22.  35
    Containment and Support: Core and Complexity in Spatial Language Learning.Barbara Landau, Kristen Johannes, Dimitrios Skordos & Anna Papafragou - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S4):748-779.
    Containment and support have traditionally been assumed to represent universal conceptual foundations for spatial terms. This assumption can be challenged, however: English in and on are applied across a surprisingly broad range of exemplars, and comparable terms in other languages show significant variation in their application. We propose that the broad domains of both containment and support have internal structure that reflects different subtypes, that this structure is reflected in basic spatial term usage across languages, and that it (...)
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  23. Starting at the end: the importance of goals in spatial language.Laura Lakusta & Barbara Landau - 2005 - Cognition 96 (1):1-33.
  24.  45
    Plasticity of human spatial cognition: Spatial language and cognition covary across cultures.Daniel B. M. Haun, Christian J. Rapold, Gabriele Janzen & Stephen C. Levinson - 2011 - Cognition 119 (1):70-80.
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  25.  14
    Children’s use of egocentric reference frames in spatial language is related to their numerical magnitude understanding.Nadja Lindner, Korbinian Moeller, Frauke Hildebrandt, Marcus Hasselhorn & Jan Lonnemann - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Numerical magnitude information is assumed to be spatially represented in the form of a mental number line defined with respect to a body-centred, egocentric frame of reference. In this context, spatial language skills such as mastery of verbal descriptions of spatial position have been proposed to be relevant for grasping spatial relations between numerical magnitudes on the mental number line. We examined 4- to 5-year-old’s spatial language skills in tasks that allow responses in egocentric (...)
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  26.  19
    Gradual development of constructional complexity in German spatial language.Karin Madlener, Katrin Skoruppa & Heike Behrens - 2017 - Cognitive Linguistics 28 (4):757-798.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  27.  17
    Inhibition within a reference frame during the interpretation of spatial language.Laura A. Carlson & Shannon R. Van Deman - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):384-407.
  28.  15
    Typological constraints on the acquisition of spatial language in French and English.Maya Hickmann & Henriëtte Hendriks - 2010 - Cognitive Linguistics 21 (2).
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  29.  8
    I'm fed up with Marmite—I'm moving on to Vegemite—What happens to the development of spatial language after the very first years?Eva-Maria Graf - 2010 - Cognitive Linguistics 21 (2).
  30.  61
    Language and the development of spatial reasoning.Anna Shusterman & E. S. Spelke - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York, US: Oxford University Press USA. pp. 89--106.
    This chapter argues that human and animal minds indeed depend on a collection of domain-specific, task-specific, and encapsulated cognitive systems: on a set of cognitive ‘modules’ in Fodor's sense. It also argues that human and animal minds are endowed with domain-general, central systems that orchestrate the information delivered by core knowledge systems. The chapter begins by reviewing the literature on spatial reorientation in animals and in young children, arguing that spatial reorientation bears the hallmarks of core knowledge and (...)
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  31.  77
    Representing Spatial Structure Through Maps and Language: Lord of the Rings Encodes the Spatial Structure of Middle Earth.Max M. Louwerse & Nick Benesh - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (8):1556-1569.
    Spatial mental representations can be derived from linguistic and non‐linguistic sources of information. This study tested whether these representations could be formed from statistical linguistic frequencies of city names, and to what extent participants differed in their performance when they estimated spatial locations from language or maps. In a computational linguistic study, we demonstrated that co‐occurrences of cities in Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit predicted the authentic longitude and latitude of those cities in (...)
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  32.  31
    Language-guided visual processing affects reasoning: The role of referential and spatial anchoring.Magda L. Dumitru, Gitte H. Joergensen, Alice G. Cruickshank & Gerry T. M. Altmann - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):562-571.
    Language is more than a source of information for accessing higher-order conceptual knowledge. Indeed, language may determine how people perceive and interpret visual stimuli. Visual processing in linguistic contexts, for instance, mirrors language processing and happens incrementally, rather than through variously-oriented fixations over a particular scene. The consequences of this atypical visual processing are yet to be determined. Here, we investigated the integration of visual and linguistic input during a reasoning task. Participants listened to sentences containing conjunctions (...)
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  33.  22
    Terry regier, the human semantic potential: Spatial language and constrained connectionism. [REVIEW]Keith Stenning - 2001 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 10 (2):266-269.
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  34.  34
    Language within your reach: Near–far perceptual space and spatial demonstratives.Kenny R. Coventry, Berenice Valdés, Alejandro Castillo & Pedro Guijarro-Fuentes - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):889-895.
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  35.  17
    Language, space, and the development of cognitive flexibility in humans: the case of two spatial memory tasks.L. Hermer-Vazquez - 2001 - Cognition 79 (3):263-299.
  36.  27
    Language as context, language as means: Spatial cognition and habitual language use.Eric Pederson - 1995 - Cognitive Linguistics 6 (1):33-62.
  37.  40
    The spatial reorientation data do not support the thesis that language is the medium of cross-modular thought.Richard Samuels - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):697-698.
    A central claim of the target article is that language is the medium of domain-general, cross-modular thought; and according to Carruthers, the main, direct evidence for this thesis comes from a series of fascinating studies on spatial reorientation. I argue that the these studies, in fact, provide us with no reason whatsoever to accept this cognitive conception of language.
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  38.  20
    Language, culture, and the embodiment of spatial cognition.Chris Sinha & Kristine Jensen de López - 2001 - Cognitive Linguistics 11 (1-2).
  39.  14
    Language supports young children’s use of spatial relations to remember locations.Hilary E. Miller, Rebecca Patterson & Vanessa R. Simmering - 2016 - Cognition 150 (C):170-180.
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  40.  69
    Spatial Position in Language and Visual Memory: A Cross-Linguistic Comparison.Anna Papafragou - unknown
    German and English speakers employ different strategies to encode static spatial scenes involving the axial position (standing vs. lying) of an inanimate figure object with respect to a ground object. In a series of three experiments, we show that this linguistic difference is not reflected in native speakers’ ability to detect changes in axial position in nonlinguistic memory tasks. Furthermore, even when participants are required to use language to encode a spatial scene, they do not rely on (...)
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  41.  16
    Cued by What We See and Hear: Spatial Reference Frame Use in Language.Kenny R. Coventry, Elena Andonova, Thora Tenbrink, Harmen B. Gudde & Paul E. Engelhardt - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9:353401.
    To what extent is the choice of what to say driven by seemingly irrelevant cues in the visual world being described? Among such cues, how does prior description affect how we process spatial scenes? When people describe where objects are located their use of spatial language is often associated with a choice of reference frame. Two experiments employing between-participants designs (N = 490) examined the effects of visual cueing and previous description on reference frame choice as reflected (...)
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  42.  11
    What spatial representation and language acquisition don't have in common.Steven Pinker - 1981 - Cognition 10 (1-3):243-248.
  43.  4
    Language learning environment: Spatial perspectives on SLA.Fang Wang, Jun Zhang & Zaibo Long - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
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  44.  13
    Spatial and cognitive vision differentiate at low levels, but not in language.Bruce Bridgeman - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):240-240.
  45. Language and spatial reasoning.P. Li & L. Gleitman - 2002 - Cognition 3:265-294.
     
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  46.  36
    Spatial prepositions as higher order functions: And implications of Grice's theory for evolution of language.Aaron Sloman - unknown
  47.  20
    Referential shift in Nicaraguan Sign Language: a transition from lexical to spatial devices.Annemarie Kocab, Jennie Pyers & Ann Senghas - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5:81651.
    Even the simplest narratives combine multiple strands of information, integrating different characters and their actions by expressing multiple perspectives of events. We examined the emergence of referential shift devices, which indicate changes among these perspectives, in Nicaraguan Sign Language (NSL). Sign languages, like spoken languages, mark referential shift grammatically with a shift in deictic perspective. In addition, sign languages can mark the shift with a point or a movement of the body to a specified spatial location in the (...)
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  48.  4
    The Influence of Language on Spatial Reasoning: Reading Habits Modulate the Formulation of Conclusions and the Integration of Premises.Thomas Castelain & Jean-Baptiste Van der Henst - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    In the present study, we explore how reading habits influence the scanning and the construction of mental models in spatial reasoning. For instance, when participants are given a problem like A is to the left of B; B is to the left of C, what is the relation between A and C? They are assumed to construct the model: A B C. If reading habits influence the scanning process, then readers of French should inspect models from left to right, (...)
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  49.  59
    Turning the tables: language and spatial reasoning.Peggy Li & Lila Gleitman - 2002 - Cognition 83 (3):265-294.
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  50.  46
    Returning the tables: language affects spatial reasoning.Stephen C. Levinson, Sotaro Kita, Daniel B. M. Haun & Björn H. Rasch - 2002 - Cognition 84 (2):155-188.
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