6 found
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  1.  45
    Testimonial injustice: discounting women’s voices in health care priority setting.Siun Gallagher, John Miles Little & Claire Hooker - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (11):744-747.
    Testimonial injustice occurs when bias against the credibility of certain social identities results in discounting of their contributions to deliberations. In this analysis, we describe testimonial injustice against women and how it figures in macroallocation procedure. We show how it harms women as deliberators, undermines the objective of inclusivity in macroallocation and affects the justice of resource distributions. We suggest that remedial action is warranted in order to limit the effects of testimonial injustice in this context, especially on marginalised and (...)
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  2.  5
    Response—An Extreme Ordeal: Writing Emotion in Qualitative Research.Siun Gallagher - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):101-108.
    Responding to the stimulus afforded by Little et al.’s “Pragmatic pluralism: Mutual tolerance of contested understandings between orthodox and alternative practitioners in autologous stem cell transplantation,” this paper explores how the norms of qualitative inquiry affect the representation of emotion in research reports. It describes a conflict between the construction of emotion in qualitative research accounts and its application to analysis and theorization, whose origins may lie in researchers’ reticence when it comes to conveying or using the emotional features of (...)
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  3.  12
    Evidence, Emotion and Eminence: A Qualitative and Evaluative Analysis of Doctors’ Skills in Macroallocation.Siun Gallagher, Miles Little & Claire Hooker - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (2):93-109.
    In this analysis of the ethical dimensions of doctors’ participation in macroallocation we set out to understand the skills they use, how they are acquired, and how they influence performance of the role. Using the principles of grounded moral analysis, we conducted a semi-structured interview study with Australian doctors engaged in macroallocation. We found that they performed expertise as argument, bringing together phronetic and rhetorical skills founded on communication, strategic thinking, finance, and health data. They had made significant, purposeful efforts (...)
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  4.  24
    The values and ethical commitments of doctors engaging in macroallocation: a qualitative and evaluative analysis.Siun Gallagher, Miles Little & Claire Hooker - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):75.
    In most socialised health systems there are formal processes that manage resource scarcity and determine the allocation of funds to health services in accordance with their priority. In this analysis, part of a larger qualitative study examining the ethical issues entailed in doctors’ participation as technical experts in priority setting, we describe the values and ethical commitments of doctors who engage in priority setting and make an empirically derived contribution towards the identification of an ethical framework for doctors’ macroallocation work. (...)
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  5.  4
    What moral weight should patient‐led demand have in clinical decisions about assisted reproductive technologies?Craig Stanbury, Wendy Lipworth, Siun Gallagher, Robert J. Norman & Ainsley J. Newson - 2023 - Bioethics 38 (1):69-77.
    Evidence suggests that one reason doctors provide certain interventions in assisted reproductive technologies (ART) is because of patient demand. This is particularly the case when it comes to unproven interventions such as ‘add‐ons’ to in vitro fertilisation (IVF) cycles, or providing IVF cycles that are highly unlikely to succeed. Doctors tend to accede to demands for such interventions because patients are willing to do and pay ‘whatever it takes’ to have a baby. However, there is uncertainty as to what moral (...)
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  6.  22
    Doctors on Values and Advocacy: A Qualitative and Evaluative Study.Siun Gallagher & Miles Little - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (4):370-385.
    Doctors are increasingly enjoined by their professional organisations to involve themselves in supraclinical advocacy, which embraces activities focused on changing practice and the system in order to address the social determinants of health. The moral basis for doctors’ decisions on whether or not to do so has been the subject of little empirical research. This opportunistic qualitative study of the values of medical graduates associated with the Sydney Medical School explores the processes that contribute to doctors’ decisions about taking up (...)
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