Results for 'Situated cognition'

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  1. Situated Cognition, Dynamic Systems, and Art: On Artistic Creativity and Aesthetic Experience.Ingar Brinck - 2007 - Janus Head 9 (2):407-431.
    It is argued that the theory of situated cognition together with dynamic systems theory can explain the core of artistic practice and aesthetic experience, and furthermore paves the way for an account of how artist and audience can meet via the artist’s work. The production and consumption of art is an embodied practice, firmly based in perception and action, and supported by features of the local, agent-centered and global, socio-cultural contexts. Artistic creativity and aesthetic experience equally result from (...)
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  2.  28
    The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition.Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.) - 2008 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Since its inception some fifty years ago, cognitive science has seen a number of sea changes. Perhaps the best known is the development of connectionist models of cognition as an alternative to classical, symbol-based approaches. A more recent - and increasingly influential - trend is that of dynamical-systems-based, ecologically oriented models of the mind. Researchers suggest that a full understanding of the mind will require systematic study of the dynamics of interaction between mind, body, and world. Some argue that (...)
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  3. A Short Primer on Situated Cognition.Philip Robbins & Murat Aydede - 2009 - In Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 3--10.
    Introductory Chapter to the _Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition_ (CUP, 2019).
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  4. How to Situate Cognition: Letting Nature Take its Course.Robert A. Wilson & Andy Clark - 2009 - In Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 55--77.
    1. The Situation in Cognition 2. Situated Cognition: A Potted Recent History 3. Extensions in Biology, Computation, and Cognition 4. Articulating the Idea of Cognitive Extension 5. Are Some Resources Intrinsically Non-Cognitive? 6. Is Cognition Extended or Only Embedded? 7. Letting Nature Take Its Course.
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  5.  33
    Interpersonally Situated Cognition.R. Peter Hobson - 2008 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (3):377 – 397.
    In this paper I consider how thinking emerges out of human infants' relatedness towards the personal and non-personal world. I highlight the contrast between cognitive aspects and cognitive components of psychological functioning, and propose that even when thinking has become a partly separable component of the mind, affective and conative aspects inhere in its nature. I provide illustrative evidence from recent research on the developmental psychopathology of autism. In failing to adopt a developmental perspective, contemporary theorizing has displaced thinking from (...)
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  6.  53
    Situated Cognition: Letting Nature Take its Course.Robert A. Wilson & Andy Clark - 2006 - In M. Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge University Press.
  7.  96
    Situated Cognition: A Field Guide to Some Open Conceptual and Ontological Issues.Sven Walter - 2014 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (2):241-263.
    This paper provides an overview over the debate about so-called “situated approaches to cognition” that depart from the intracranialism associated with traditional cognitivism insofar as they stress the importance of body, world, and interaction for cognitive processing. It sketches the outlines of an overarching framework that reveals the differences, commonalities, and interdependencies between the various claims and positions of second-generation cognitive science, and identifies a number of apparently unresolved conceptual and ontological issues.
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  8.  60
    A Situated Cognition Perspective on Presence.Antonella Carassa, Francesca Morganti & Maurizio Tirassa - unknown
    During interaction with computer-based 3-D simulations like virtual reality, users may experience a sense of involvement called presence. Presence is commonly defined as the subjective feeling of "being there". We discuss the state of the art in this inno vative research area and introduce a situated cognition perspective on presence. We argue that presence depends on the proper integration of aspects relevant to an agent's movement and perception, to her actions, and to her conception of the overall situ (...)
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  9.  97
    Problem Solving and Situated Cognition.David Kirsh - 2009 - In Philip Robbins & M. Aydede (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 264--306.
    In the course of daily life we solve problems often enough that there is a special term to characterize the activity and the right to expect a scientific theory to explain its dynamics. The classical view in psychology is that to solve a problem a subject must frame it by creating an internal representation of the problem‘s structure, usually called a problem space. This space is an internally generable representation that is mathematically identical to a graph structure with nodes and (...)
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  10. Problem Solving and Situated Cognition.David Kirsh - 2009 - The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition:264-306.
    In the course of daily life we solve problems often enough that there is a special term to characterize the activity and the right to expect a scientific theory to explain its dynamics. The classical view in psychology is that to solve a problem a subject must frame it by creating an internal representation of the problem’s structure, usually called a problem space. This space is an internally generable representation that is mathematically identical to a graph structure with nodes and (...)
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  11. Situated Cognition.Peter Slezak - 1999 - Perspectives on Cognitive Science.
    The self-advertising, at least, suggests that 'situated cognition' involves the most fundamental conceptual re-organization in AI and cognitive science, even appearing to deny that cognition is to be explained by mental representations. In their defence of the orthodox symbolic representational theory, A. Vera and H. Simon have rebutted many of these claims, but they overlook an important reading of situated arguments which may, after all, involve a revolutionary insight. I show that the whole debate turns on (...)
     
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  12. Philosophical Antecedents of Situated Cognition.Shaun Gallagher - 2009 - In Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 35--53.
  13.  38
    Situated Cognition: The Perspect Model.Lawrence Lengbeyer - 2007 - In David Spurrett, Don Ross, Harold Kincaid & Lynn Stephens (eds.), Distributed Cognition and the Will: Individual Volition and Social Context. MIT Press. pp. 227.
    The standard philosophical and folk-psychological accounts of cognition and action credit us with too much spontaneity in our activities and projects. We are taken to be fundamentally active rather than reactive, to project our needs and aims and deploy our full supporting arsenal of cognitive instruments upon an essentially passive environment. The corrected point of view presented here balances this image of active agency with an appreciation of how we are also continually responding to the world, that is, to (...)
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  14. Explanation: Mechanism, Modularity, and Situated Cognition.William Bechtel - 2009 - In Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 155--170.
  15.  12
    Interactionally Situated Cognition: A Classroom Example.Stanton Wortham - 2001 - Cognitive Science 25 (1):37-66.
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  16.  13
    Situating Cognitive Propositions in a Broader Context.Scott Soames - 2015 - In Rethinking Language, Mind, and Meaning. Princeton University Press. pp. 164-207.
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  17. Against Strong Ethical Parity: Situated Cognition Theses and Transcranial Brain Stimulation.Jan-Hendrik Heinrichs - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11 (171).
    According to a prominent suggestion in the ethics of transcranial neurostimulation the effects of such devices can be treated as ethically on par with established, pre-neurotechnological alterations of the mind. This parity allegedly is supported by situated cognition theories showing how external devices can be part of a cognitive system. This article will evaluate this suggestion. It will reject the claim, that situated cognition theories support ethical parity. It will however point out another reason, why external (...)
     
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  18. From Linguistic Contextualism to Situated Cognition: The Case of Ad Hoc Concepts.Jérôme Dokic - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (3):309 – 328.
    Our utterances are typically if not always "situated," in the sense that they are true or false relative to unarticulated parameters of the extra-linguistic context. The problem is to explain how these parameters are determined, given that nothing in the uttered sentences indicates them. It is tempting to claim that they must be determined at the level of thought or intention. However, as many philosophers have observed, thoughts themselves are no less situated than utterances. Unarticulated parameters need not (...)
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  19.  12
    Situated Cognition, Prescriptive Theory, Evolution, and Something.Jonathan Baron - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):324-326.
  20. Situated Cognition.Kevin O'Connor & Arthur M. Glenberg - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
  21. How Situated Cognition is Different From Situated Robotics.William Clancey - 1995 - In Luc Steels & Rodney Brooks (eds.), The "Artificial Life" Route to "Artificial Intelligence": Building Situated Embodied Agents. Hillsdale, Nj: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. pp. 227-236.
  22.  44
    Minds, Brains, and Capacities: Situated Cognition and Neo-Aristotelianism.Hans-Johann Glock - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    This article compares situated cognition to contemporary Neo-Aristotelian approaches to the mind. The article distinguishes two components in this paradigm: an Aristotelian essentialism which is alien to situated cognition and a Wittgensteinian “capacity approach” to the mind which is not just congenial to it but provides important conceptual and argumentative resources in defending social cognition against orthodox cognitive science. It focuses on a central tenet of that orthodoxy. According to what I call “encephalocentrism,” cognition (...)
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  23.  7
    Biographical Situations, Cognitive Structures and Human Development: Confronting Sartre and Piaget.Hugh J. Silverman - 1979 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 10 (2):119-137.
  24.  32
    Science Education for Women: Situated Cognition, Feminist Standpoint Theory, and the Status of Women in Science.Cassandra L. Pinnick - 2008 - Science & Education 17 (10):1055-1063.
  25.  19
    A Cognition Paradigm Clash: Simon, Situated Cognition and the Interpretation of Bounded Rationality.Enrico Petracca - 2017 - Journal of Economic Methodology 24 (1):20-40.
    Simon’s notion of bounded rationality is deeply intertwined with his activity as a cognitive psychologist and founder of so-called cognitivism, a mainstream approach in cognitive psychology until the 1980s. Cognitivism, understood as ‘symbolic information processing,’ provided the first cognitive psychology foundation to bounded rationality. Has bounded rationality since then fully followed the development of cognitive psychology beyond symbolic information processing in the post-Simonian era? To answer this question, this paper focuses on Simon’s opposition during the 1990s to a new view (...)
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  26.  18
    Meshed Architecture of Performance as a Model of Situated Cognition.Shaun Gallagher & Somogy Varga - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
  27.  76
    The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition.Patricia Benner - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):215-215.
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  28.  37
    Tool Use as Situated Cognition.Bryce Huebner & Andy Blitzer - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):245-62.
    Vaesen disregards a plausible alternative to his position, and so fails to offer a compelling argument for unique cognitive mechanisms. We suggest an ecological alternative, according to which divergent relationships between organism and environment, not exotic neuroanatomy, are responsible for unique cognitive capacities. This approach is pertinent to claims about primate cognition; and on this basis, we argue that Vaesen's inference from unique skills to unique mechanisms is unwarranted.
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  29.  38
    Do Early Body Ornaments Prove Cognitive Modernity? A Critical Analysis From Situated Cognition.Duilio Garofoli - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):803-825.
    The documented appearance of body ornaments in the archaeological record of early anatomically modern human and late Neanderthal populations has been claimed to be proof of symbolism and cognitive modernity. Recently, Henshilwood and Dubreuil (Current Anthropology 52:361–400, 2011) have supported this stance by arguing that the use of beads and body painting implies the presence of properties typical of modern cognition: high-level theory of mind and awareness of abstract social standards. In this paper I shall disagree with this position. (...)
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  30.  6
    Socio-Cultural Influences on Situated Cognition in Nature.Theresa Schilhab & Gertrud Lynge Esbensen - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  31. The Cognitive Integration of Scientific Instruments: Information, Situated Cognition, and Scientific Practice.Richard Heersmink - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (4):1-21.
    Researchers in the biological and biomedical sciences, particularly those working in laboratories, use a variety of artifacts to help them perform their cognitive tasks. This paper analyses the relationship between researchers and cognitive artifacts in terms of integration. It first distinguishes different categories of cognitive artifacts used in biological practice on the basis of their informational properties. This results in a novel classification of scientific instruments, conducive to an analysis of the cognitive interactions between researchers and artifacts. It then uses (...)
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  32.  46
    Can We Make Sense of Subjective Experience in Metabolically Situated Cognitive Processes?Alex Rosenberg - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (1-2):13.
    In “Mind, matter and metabolism,” Godfrey-Smith’s objective is to “develop a picture” in which, first, the basis of living activity in physical processes “makes sense,” second, the basis of proto-cognitive activity in living activity “makes sense” and third, “the basis of subjective experience in metabolically situated cognitive processes also makes sense.” show that he fails to attain all three of these objectives, largely owing to the nature and modularization of metabolism.
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  33.  20
    The Cultural Evolution of Socially Situated Cognition.Liane Gabora - manuscript
    Because human cognition is creative and socially situated, knowledge accumulates, diffuses, and gets applied in new contexts, generating cultural analogs of phenomena observed in population genetics such as adaptation and drift. It is therefore commonly thought that elements of culture evolve through natural selection. However, natural selection was proposed to explain how change accumulates despite lack of inheritance of acquired traits, as occurs with template-mediated replication. It cannot accommodate a process with significant retention of acquired or horizontally (e.g. (...)
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  34.  5
    The Temporality of Situated Cognition.David H. V. Vogel, Mathis Jording, Christian Kupke & Kai Vogeley - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  35. Situated Normativity: The Normative Aspect of Embodied Cognition in Unreflective Action.Erik Rietveld - 2008 - Mind 117 (468):973-1001.
    In everyday life we often act adequately, yet without deliberation. For instance, we immediately obtain and maintain an appropriate distance from others in an elevator. The notion of normativity implied here is a very basic one, namely distinguishing adequate from inadequate, correct from incorrect, or better from worse in the context of a particular situation. In the first part of this paper I investigate such ‘situated normativity’ by focusing on unreflective expert action. More particularly, I use Wittgenstein’s examples of (...)
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  36.  31
    Situating Machine Intelligence Within the Cognitive Ecology of the Internet.Paul Smart - 2017 - Minds and Machines 27 (2):357-380.
    The Internet is an important focus of attention for the philosophy of mind and cognitive science communities. This is partly because the Internet serves as an important part of the material environment in which a broad array of human cognitive and epistemic activities are situated. The Internet can thus be seen as an important part of the ‘cognitive ecology’ that helps to shape, support and realize aspects of human cognizing. Much of the previous philosophical work in this area has (...)
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  37.  6
    Better models of the evolution of cooperation through situated cognition.Archie Fields - 2021 - Biology and Philosophy 36 (4):1-19.
    A number of philosophers :171–187, 2011; Arnold 2011, in Ethics Politics XV:101–138, 2013) have argued that agent-based, evolutionary game theory models of the evolution of cooperation fail to provide satisfying explanations of cooperation because they are too disconnected from actual biology. I show how these criticisms can be answered by employing modeling approaches from the situated cognition research program that allow for more biologically detailed models. Using cases drawn from recent situated cognition modeling research, I show (...)
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  38.  96
    Identification, Situational Constraint, and Social Cognition: Studies in the Attribution of Moral Responsibility.Robert L. Woolfolk, John M. Doris & John M. Darley - 2006 - Cognition 100 (2):283-301.
  39.  32
    ‘Top Down’ and ‘Bottom Up’: Imagination in the Context of Situated Cognition.Julia Jansen - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 19:31-39.
    In this paper I want to discuss the implications of adopting different general philosophical approaches for assessing the relation between perception and imagination. In particular, I am interested in different views resulting from ‘top down’ and ‘bottom up’ approaches to cognition. By ‘top down’ approaches I meanapproaches that conceive of cognition as a process or activity that is guided by intellectual or conceptual (‘top’) elements. (I consider broadly speaking Kantian accounts typical.) By ‘bottom up’ approaches I mean approaches (...)
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  40.  70
    A Cognitive-Affective System Theory of Personality: Reconceptualizing Situations, Dispositions, Dynamics, and Invariance in Personality Structure.Walter Mischel & Yuichi Shoda - 1995 - Psychological Review 102 (2):246-268.
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  41. Cognition in the Head and in the World: Introduction to a Debate on Situated Cognition.D. A. Norman - 1993 - Cognitive Science 17:124-138.
     
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  42.  25
    Identification, Situational Constraint, and Social Cognition: Studies in the Attribution of Moral Responsibility.Rob Woolfolk, John Doris & John Darley - 2008 - In Shaun Nichols & Joshua Knobe (eds.), Experimental Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 61.
  43. Cognition in Context: Phenomenology, Situated Robotics and the Frame Problem.Michael Wheeler - 2008 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (3):323 – 349.
    The frame problem is the difficulty of explaining how non-magical systems think and act in ways that are adaptively sensitive to context-dependent relevance. Influenced centrally by Heideggerian phenomenology, Hubert Dreyfus has argued that the frame problem is, in part, a consequence of the assumption (made by mainstream cognitive science and artificial intelligence) that intelligent behaviour is representation-guided behaviour. Dreyfus' Heideggerian analysis suggests that the frame problem dissolves if we reject representationalism about intelligence and recognize that human agents realize the property (...)
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  44. Whatever Next? Predictive Brains, Situated Agents, and the Future of Cognitive Science.Andy Clark - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):181-204.
    Brains, it has recently been argued, are essentially prediction machines. They are bundles of cells that support perception and action by constantly attempting to match incoming sensory inputs with top-down expectations or predictions. This is achieved using a hierarchical generative model that aims to minimize prediction error within a bidirectional cascade of cortical processing. Such accounts offer a unifying model of perception and action, illuminate the functional role of attention, and may neatly capture the special contribution of cortical processing to (...)
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  45. Situated Mediation and Technological Reflexivity: Smartphones, Extended Memory, and Limits of Cognitive Enhancement.Chris Drain & Richard Charles Strong - 2015 - In Frank Scalambrino (ed.), Social Epistemology and Technology: Toward Public Self-Awareness Regarding Technological Mediation. London, UK: pp. 187-195.
    The situated potentials for action between material things in the world and the interactional processes thereby afforded need to be seen as not only constituting the possibility of agency, but thereby also comprising it. Eo ipso, agency must be de-fused from any local, "contained" subject and be understood as a situational property in which subjects and objects can both participate. Any technological artifact should thus be understood as a complex of agential capacities that function relative to any number of (...)
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  46. Identification, Situational Constraint, and Social Cognition : Studies in the Attribution of Moral Responsibility.Robert L. Woolfolk, John M. Doris & & John M. Darley - 2007 - In Joshua Knobe (ed.), Experimental Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  47. Situated and Distributed Cognition in Artifact Negotiation and Trade-Specific Skills: A Cognitive Ethnography of Kashmiri Carpet Weaving Practice.Gagan Deep Kaur - 2018 - Theory and Psychology 28 (4):451-475.
    This article describes various ways actors in Kashmiri carpet weaving practice deploy a range of artifacts, from symbolic, to material, to hybrid, in order to achieve diverse cognitive accomplishments in their particular task domains: information representation, inter and intra-domain communication, distribution of cognitive labor across people and time, coordination of team activities, and carrying of cultural heritage. In this repertoire, some artifacts position themselves as naïve tools in the actors’ environment to the point of being ignored; however, their usage-in-context unfolds (...)
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  48.  16
    Situating Distributed Cognition.Lisa M. Osbeck & Nancy J. Nersessian - 2014 - Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-16.
    We historically and conceptually situate distributed cognition by drawing attention to important similarities in assumptions and methods with those of American ?functional psychology? as it emerged in contrast and complement to controlled laboratory study of the structural components and primitive ?elements? of consciousness. Functional psychology foregrounded the adaptive features of cognitive processes in environments, and adopted as a unit of analysis the overall situation of organism and environment. A methodological implication of this emphasis was, to the extent possible, the (...)
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  49.  8
    Reconsidering P-Prims Theory From the Viewpoint of Situated Cognition.Naoki Ueno - 1993 - Ethics and Behavior 10 (2):239-248.
  50.  8
    Situated Ignorance: The Distribution and Extension of Ignorance in Cognitive Niches.Selene Arfini - 2019 - Synthese 198 (5):4079-4095.
    Ignorance is easily representable as a cognitive property of more than just individual subjects: groups, crowds, and even populations can share the same ignorance regarding particular concepts and ideas. Nevertheless, according to some theories that refer to the extension, distribution, and situatedness of human cognition, ignorance is hardly a state that can be extended, distributed, and situated in the same way in which knowledge is in our eco-cognitive environment. In order to understand how these contradictory takes can come (...)
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