Results for 'Simon J. Little'

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  1.  34
    “Aha!” is stronger when preceded by a “huh?”: presentation of a solution affects ratings of aha experience conditional on accuracy.Margaret E. Webb, Simon J. Cropper & Daniel R. Little - 2019 - Thinking and Reasoning 25 (3):324-364.
    Insight has been investigated under the assumption that participants solve insight problems with insight processes and/or experiences. A recent trend has involved presenting participants with the solution and analysing the resultant experience as if insight has taken place. We examined self-reports of the aha experience, a defining aspect of insight, before and after feedback, along with additional affective components of insight (e.g., pleasure, surprise, impasse). Classic insight problems, compound remote associates, and non-insight problems were randomly interleaved and presented to participants. (...)
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  2.  5
    Using Neuroscientific and Clinical Context to Assess and Manage Changes in Core Personal Traits Caused by Deep Brain Stimulation.Colin W. Hoy, Simon J. Little & Winston Chiong - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 14 (3):310-312.
    Recent debate has arisen in the neuroethics literature on the extent to which deep brain stimulation (DBS) may cause changes to core personal traits. This has prompted calls for more empirical data...
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  3.  31
    Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: Advances in Neurophysiology, Adaptive DBS, Virtual Reality, Neuroethics and Technology.Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora, James Giordano, Aysegul Gunduz, Jose Alcantara, Jackson N. Cagle, Stephanie Cernera, Parker Difuntorum, Robert S. Eisinger, Julieth Gomez, Sarah Long, Brandon Parks, Joshua K. Wong, Shannon Chiu, Bhavana Patel, Warren M. Grill, Harrison C. Walker, Simon J. Little, Ro’ee Gilron, Gerd Tinkhauser, Wesley Thevathasan, Nicholas C. Sinclair, Andres M. Lozano, Thomas Foltynie, Alfonso Fasano, Sameer A. Sheth, Katherine Scangos, Terence D. Sanger, Jonathan Miller, Audrey C. Brumback, Priya Rajasethupathy, Cameron McIntyre, Leslie Schlachter, Nanthia Suthana, Cynthia Kubu, Lauren R. Sankary, Karen Herrera-Ferrá, Steven Goetz, Binith Cheeran, G. Karl Steinke, Christopher Hess, Leonardo Almeida, Wissam Deeb, Kelly D. Foote & Okun Michael S. - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  4.  41
    The contributions of convergent thinking, divergent thinking, and schizotypy to solving insight and non-insight problems.Margaret E. Webb, Daniel R. Little, Simon J. Cropper & Kayla Roze - 2017 - Thinking and Reasoning 23 (3):235-258.
    The ability to generate diverse ideas is valuable in solving creative problems ; yet, however advantageous, this ability is insufficient to solve the problem alone and requires the ability to logically deduce an assessment of correctness of each solution. Positive schizotypy may help isolate the aspects of divergent thinking prevalent in insight problem solving. Participants were presented with a measure of schizotypy, divergent and convergent thinking tasks, insight problems, and non-insight problems. We found no evidence for a relationship between schizotypy (...)
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  5.  6
    Squaring the Shield: William Ridgeway's Two Models of Early Greece.Simon J. Cook - 2014 - History of European Ideas 40 (5):693-713.
    SummaryFrom the early 1880s the Cambridge-trained classicist William Ridgeway had applied cutting-edge anthropological theory to his reading of ancient Greek literature in order to develop an evolutionary account of the continuous development of early Greek social institutions. Then, at the turn of the century, he began to argue that archaeological evidence demonstrated that the Achaean warriors described by Homer were in origin Germanic tribesmen from north of the Alps who had but recently conquered Mycenaean Greece. The present paper inquires as (...)
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  6.  33
    Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: Advances in Optogenetics, Ethical Issues Affecting DBS Research, Neuromodulatory Approaches for Depression, Adaptive Neurostimulation, and Emerging DBS Technologies.Vinata Vedam-Mai, Karl Deisseroth, James Giordano, Gabriel Lazaro-Munoz, Winston Chiong, Nanthia Suthana, Jean-Philippe Langevin, Jay Gill, Wayne Goodman, Nicole R. Provenza, Casey H. Halpern, Rajat S. Shivacharan, Tricia N. Cunningham, Sameer A. Sheth, Nader Pouratian, Katherine W. Scangos, Helen S. Mayberg, Andreas Horn, Kara A. Johnson, Christopher R. Butson, Ro’ee Gilron, Coralie de Hemptinne, Robert Wilt, Maria Yaroshinsky, Simon Little, Philip Starr, Greg Worrell, Prasad Shirvalkar, Edward Chang, Jens Volkmann, Muthuraman Muthuraman, Sergiu Groppa, Andrea A. Kühn, Luming Li, Matthew Johnson, Kevin J. Otto, Robert Raike, Steve Goetz, Chengyuan Wu, Peter Silburn, Binith Cheeran, Yagna J. Pathak, Mahsa Malekmohammadi, Aysegul Gunduz, Joshua K. Wong, Stephanie Cernera, Aparna Wagle Shukla, Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora, Wissam Deeb, Addie Patterson, Kelly D. Foote & Michael S. Okun - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15:644593.
    We estimate that 208,000 deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices have been implanted to address neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders worldwide. DBS Think Tank presenters pooled data and determined that DBS expanded in its scope and has been applied to multiple brain disorders in an effort to modulate neural circuitry. The DBS Think Tank was founded in 2012 providing a space where clinicians, engineers, researchers from industry and academia discuss current and emerging DBS technologies and logistical and ethical issues facing the field. (...)
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  7.  58
    Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: Advances in Cutting Edge Technologies, Artificial Intelligence, Neuromodulation, Neuroethics, Pain, Interventional Psychiatry, Epilepsy, and Traumatic Brain Injury.Joshua K. Wong, Günther Deuschl, Robin Wolke, Hagai Bergman, Muthuraman Muthuraman, Sergiu Groppa, Sameer A. Sheth, Helen M. Bronte-Stewart, Kevin B. Wilkins, Matthew N. Petrucci, Emilia Lambert, Yasmine Kehnemouyi, Philip A. Starr, Simon Little, Juan Anso, Ro’ee Gilron, Lawrence Poree, Giridhar P. Kalamangalam, Gregory A. Worrell, Kai J. Miller, Nicholas D. Schiff, Christopher R. Butson, Jaimie M. Henderson, Jack W. Judy, Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora, Kelly D. Foote, Peter A. Silburn, Luming Li, Genko Oyama, Hikaru Kamo, Satoko Sekimoto, Nobutaka Hattori, James J. Giordano, Diane DiEuliis, John R. Shook, Darin D. Doughtery, Alik S. Widge, Helen S. Mayberg, Jungho Cha, Kisueng Choi, Stephen Heisig, Mosadolu Obatusin, Enrico Opri, Scott B. Kaufman, Prasad Shirvalkar, Christopher J. Rozell, Sankaraleengam Alagapan, Robert S. Raike, Hemant Bokil, David Green & Michael S. Okun - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    DBS Think Tank IX was held on August 25–27, 2021 in Orlando FL with US based participants largely in person and overseas participants joining by video conferencing technology. The DBS Think Tank was founded in 2012 and provides an open platform where clinicians, engineers and researchers can freely discuss current and emerging deep brain stimulation technologies as well as the logistical and ethical issues facing the field. The consensus among the DBS Think Tank IX speakers was that DBS expanded in (...)
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  8.  61
    Shared circuits in language and communication.Simon Garrod & Martin J. Pickering - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):26-27.
    The target article says surprisingly little about the possible role of shared circuits in language and communication. This commentary considers how they might contribute to linguistic communication, particularly during dialogue. We argue that shared circuits are used to promote alignment between linguistic representations at many levels and to support production-based emulation of linguistic input during comprehension.
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  9.  16
    Care and its constraints: Will care work pass through Pettit’s gate?Simon Laumann Jørgensen - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 44 (3):278-301.
    Welfare states are in a care crisis both in the sense of a practical care gap and in the new movement to limit care to mere rehabilitation. Few political theorists pay attention to these developments, and those who do say little about the potential limits to care. This article discusses Philip Pettit’s theory of social justice in relation to questions of public care provisions. Pettit’s theory has been praised by feminists for its attention to social injustices and because it (...)
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  10. Evidence for preserved representations in change blindness.Daniel J. Simons, Christopher Chabris & Tatiana Schnur - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):78-97.
    People often fail to detect large changes to scenes, provided that the changes occur during a visual disruption. This phenomenon, known as ''change blindness,'' occurs both in the laboratory and in real-world situations in which changes occur unexpectedly. The pervasiveness of the inability to detect changes is consistent with the theoretical notion that we internally represent relatively little information from our visual world from one glance at a scene to the next. However, evidence for change blindness does not necessarily (...)
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  11. Change blindness, representations, and consciousness: Reply to Noe.Daniel J. Simons & Ronald A. Rensink - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (5):219.
    Our recent opinion article [1] examined what change blindness can and cannot tell us about visual representations. Among other things, we argued that change blindness can tell us a lot about how visual representations can be used, but little about their extent. We and others found the ‘sparse representations’ view appealing (and still do), and initially made the overly strong claim that change blindness supports the conclusion of sparse representations [2,3]. We wrote our article because change blindness continues to (...)
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  12.  57
    The silent majority: Who speaks at IRB meetings.Philip J. Candilis, Charles W. Lidz, Paul S. Appelbaum, Robert M. Arnold, William P. Gardner, Suzanne Myers, Albert J. Grudzinskas Jr & Lorna J. Simon - 2012 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (4):15-20.
    Institutional review boards are almost universally considered to be overworked and understaffed. They also require substantial commitments of time and resources from their members. Although some surveys report average IRB memberships of 15 people or more, federal regulations require only five. We present data on IRB meetings at eight of the top 25 academic medical centers in the United States funded by the National Institutes of Health. These data indicate substantial contributions from primary reviewers and chairs during protocol discussions but (...)
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  13. Rosenzweig's Relational Ethics.Julius J. Simon - 1994 - Dissertation, Temple University
    The ideas of Franz Rosenzweig have had relatively little impact outside of the circle of contemporary liberal Jewish thinkers. It is even more unlikely that his name would be found in any of the countless volumes an ethical theory. I argue that the ethical theory implied in his primary philosophical work, The Star of Redemption, is compelling and worth sustained and serious study by a wider audience. ;Rosenzweig rejects an Hegelian totalitarian ontological framework for ethics, in favor of a (...)
     
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  14.  59
    Change blindness, Gibson, and the sensorimotor theory of vision.Brian J. Scholl & Daniel J. Simons - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1004-1006.
    We suggest that the sensorimotor “theory” of vision is really an unstructured collection of separate ideas, and that much of the evidence cited in its favor at best supports only a subset of these ideas. As an example, we note that work on change blindness does not “vindicate” (or even speak to) much of the sensorimotor framework. Moreover, the ideas themselves are not always internally consistent. Finally, the proposed framework draws on ideas initially espoused by James Gibson, but does (...) to differentiate itself from those earlier views. For even part of this framework to become testable, it must specify which sources of evidence can support or contradict each of the component hypotheses. (shrink)
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  15.  12
    Freedom of choice.Yves René Marie Simon - 1969 - New York,: Fordham University Press. Edited by Peter Wolff.
    From the Foreward by Mortimer J. Adler Of all the question or issues concerning human freedom, none is more fundamental in itself and in its consequences than the problem of free choice; and none has been the subject of more persistent and, at the same time, apparently irresolvable controversyThis bookis the perfect antidote for the errors, the misunderstandings or worse, the ignorances that beset the modern discussion of free choice. Even the reader who comes to this book with little (...)
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  16. “But Is It Science Fiction?”: Science Fiction and a Theory of Genre.Simon J. Evnine - 2015 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):1-28.
    If science fiction is a genre, then attempts to think about the nature of science fiction will be affected by one’s understanding of what genres are. I shall examine two approaches to genre, one dominant but inadequate, the other better, but only occasionally making itself seen. I shall then discuss several important, interrelated issues, focusing particularly on science fiction : what it is for a work to belong to a genre, the semantics of genre names, the validity of attempts to (...)
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  17.  16
    On Being with Others: Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Derrida.Simon Glendinning - 1998 - New York: Routledge.
    On Being With Others is an outstanding exploration of this key philosophical question. Simon Glendinning shows how traditional positions in the philosophy of mind can do little to rebuff the accusation that in fact we have little claim to have knowledge of minds other than our own. On Being With Others sets out to refute this charge and disentangle many of the confusions in contemporary philosophy of mind and language that have led to such scepticism. Simon (...)
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  18.  5
    On Being with Others: Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Derrida.Simon Glendinning - 1998 - New York: Routledge.
    _On Being With Others_ is an outstanding exploration of this key philosophical question. Simon Glendinning shows how traditional positions in the philosophy of mind can do little to rebuff the accusation that in fact we have little claim to have knowledge of minds other than our own. _On Being With Others_ sets out to refute this charge and disentangle many of the confusions in contemporary philosophy of mind and language that have led to such scepticism. Simon (...)
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  19.  28
    The Historicity of Artifacts: Use and Counter-Use.Simon J. Evnine - 2022 - Metaphysics 5 (1):1-13.
    Inspired by Sara Ahmed’s notion of ‘queer use,’ I present and extend a neo-Aristotelian theory of artifacts to capture what I call ‘counter-use.’ The theory of artifacts is based on the idea that what they are, how they come to be, and what their functions are cannot be understood independently from each other. They come to exist when a maker imposes the concept of their substantial kind onto some matter by working on the matter to make an artifact of that (...)
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  20.  4
    Ramism and the reformation of method: the Franciscan legacy in early modernity.Simon J. G. Burton - 2024 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The Prologue offers an overview of the Reformation of method from Augustine of Hippo through to the Ramist movement, providing an orientation to the rest of the book. It highlights and explains an important nexus of Realism, exemplarism and illumination fundamental to Ramism. Beginning with Augustine it shows how these themes coalesced into a distinctive Christian philosophy taken up and refined by Franciscans such as Bonaventure of Bagnoregio and John Duns Scotus, as well as by Ramon Lull, the Franciscan-inspired encyclopaedist. (...)
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  21.  12
    Philosophy Through Memes.Simon J. Evnine - 2022 - In Lee C. McIntyre, Nancy Arden McHugh & Ian Olasov (eds.), A companion to public philosophy. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 311–324.
    A paradigm of a meme, in its contemporary sense, is an image macro – an image copied by users, who customize it by adding their own text according to implicitly prescribed norms. The native medium of philosophy is language, generally in the form of either discursive text or Socratic discussion. This chapter suggests there are two features of human existence that stand to meme‐making in something of the same relation as spontaneous dance does to choreography. These features are bricolage and (...)
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  22.  31
    The Humble Origins of Russell's Paradox.J. Alberto Coffa - 1979 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 1:31-37.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The humble origins of Russell's paradox by J. Alberto Coffa ON SEVERAL OCCASIONS Russell pointed out that the discovery of his celebrated paradox concerning the class of all classes not belonging to themselves was intimately related to Cantor's proof that there is no greatest cardinal. lOne of the earliest remarks to that effect occurs in The Principles ofMathematics where, referring to the universal class, the class of all classes (...)
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  23.  8
    Metaphors and the Application of a Corporate Code of Ethics.Simone J. Van Zolingen & Hakan Honders - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):385-400.
    This article researches how a corporate code of ethics (CCE) implemented in local government X has influenced the behavior of its employees, middle managers, and managers. Metaphors from the existing and desired CCE elicited by these three groups provided information on how to improve the effectiveness of the CCE. This method proved to be very fruitful. It appeared that continuous systematic attention needed to be paid to the CCE after the CCE had been implemented, particularly by management. Initiatives from management (...)
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  24. Ready-Mades: Ontology and Aesthetics.Simon J. Evnine - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):407-423.
    I explore the interrelations between the ontological and aesthetic issues raised by ready-mades such as Duchamp’s Fountain. I outline a hylomorphic metaphysics which has two central features. First, hylomorphically complex objects have matter to which they are not identical. Secondly, when such objects are artefacts (including artworks), it is essential to them that they are the products of creative work on their matter. Against this background, I suggest that ready-mades are of aesthetic interest because they pose a dilemma. Is there (...)
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  25. Believing conjunctions.Simon J. Evnine - 1999 - Synthese 118 (2):201-227.
    I argue that it is rational for a person to believe the conjunction of her beliefs. This involves responding to the Lottery and Preface Paradoxes. In addition, I suggest that in normal circumstances, what it is to believe a conjunction just is to believe its conjuncts.
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  26.  78
    Simone de Beauvoir and Hannah Arendt.Lori J. Marso - 2012 - Political Theory 40 (2):165-193.
    This article compares Hannah Arendt's famous essay on Adolf Eichmann's trial in Israel in 1961 to Simone de Beauvoir's little studied piece, "An Eye for an Eye," on the trial of Robert Brasillach in France in 1945. Arendt and Beauvoir each determine the complicity of individuals acting within a political order that seeks to eliminate certain forms of otherness and difference, but come to differing conclusions about the significance of the crimes. I explain Beauvoir's account of ambiguity, on which (...)
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  27. The Anonymity of a Murmur: Internet Memes.Simon J. Evnine - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (3):303-318.
    Memes, of the kind found often on the internet, are an increasingly significant medium of expressive activity. I develop a theory of their ontological nature and, in parallel, an analysis of the concept meme. On my view, memes are abstract artifacts made out of norms for production of instances. The norms say things like ‘use a certain image; add text of a certain kind; the text should be delivered in two chunks, one at the top of the image, one at (...)
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  28. Constitution and qua objects in the ontology of music.Simon J. Evnine - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):203-217.
    Musical Platonists identify musical works with abstract sound structures but this implies that they are not created but only discovered. Jerrold Levinson adapts Platonism to allow for creation by identifying musical works with indicated sound structures. In this paper I explore the similarities between Levinson's view and Kit Fine's theory of qua objects. Fine offers the theory of qua objects as an account of constitution, as it obtains, for example, between a statue and the clay the statue is made out (...)
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  29. Constitution and Composition: Three Approaches to their Relation.Simon J. Evnine - 2011 - ProtoSociology 27:212-235.
    Constitution is the relation between something and what it is made of. Composition is the relation between something and its parts. I examine three different approaches to the relation between constitution and composition. One approach, associated with neo-Aristotelians like Mark Johnston and Kathrin Koslicki, identifies constitution with composition. A second, popular with those sympathetic to classical mereology such as Judith Thomson, defines constitution in terms of parthood. A third, advocated strongly by Lynne Baker, takes constitution to be somehow inconsistent with (...)
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  30.  39
    : Working memory, inhibitory control and the development of children's reasoning.Simon J. Handley, A. Capon, M. Beveridge, I. Dennis & J. St B. T. Evans - 2004 - Thinking and Reasoning 10 (2):175-195.
  31. The universality of logic: On the connection between rationality and logical ability.Simon J. Evnine - 2001 - Mind 110 (438):335-367.
    I argue for the thesis (UL) that there are certain logical abilities that any rational creature must have. Opposition to UL comes from naturalized epistemologists who hold that it is a purely empirical question which logical abilities a rational creature has. I provide arguments that any creatures meeting certain conditions—plausible necessary conditions on rationality—must have certain specific logical concepts and be able to use them in certain specific ways. For example, I argue that any creature able to grasp theories must (...)
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  32.  21
    The Vicissitudes of Embodiment Across the Chronic Illness Trajectory.Simon J. Williams - 1996 - Body and Society 2 (2):23-47.
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  33.  98
    Learning from one's mistakes: Epistemic modesty and the nature of belief.Simon J. Evnine - 2001 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):157–177.
    I argue that it is not ideally rational to believe that some of one's current beliefs are false, despite the impressive inductive evidence concerning others and our former selves. One's own current beliefs represent a commitment which would be undermined by taking some of them to be false. The nature of this commitment is examined in the light of Nagel's distinction between subjective and objective points of view. Finally, I suggest how we might acknowledge our fallibility consistently with this special (...)
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  34.  26
    Bodily Dys-Order: Desire, Excess and the Transgression of Corporeal Boundaries.Simon J. Williams - 1998 - Body and Society 4 (2):59-82.
    Taking as its point of departure Leder's phenomenological discussion of the `absent' body, this article explores the nature of human corporeality as a site of transgression. The body, I argue, using a process metaphysic, is first and foremost excessive, driven by human desire rather than animal need: a sensual mode of existence organized around the pleasure/pain axis. To be excessive/transgressive, however, implies the crossing of boundaries or limits which vary according to history and culture, time and place. These issues are (...)
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  35.  65
    Supposition and representation in human reasoning.Simon J. Handley & Jonathan StB. T. Evans - 2000 - Thinking and Reasoning 6 (4):273-311.
    We report the results of three experiments designed to assess the role of suppositions in human reasoning. Theories of reasoning based on formal rules propose that the ability to make suppositions is central to deductive reasoning. Our first experiment compared two types of problem that could be solved by a suppositional strategy. Our results showed no difference in difficulty between problems requiring affirmative or negative suppositions and very low logical solution rates throughout. Further analysis of the error data showed a (...)
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  36.  16
    Differences in time-based task characteristics help to explain the age-prospective memory paradox.Simon J. Haines, Susan E. Randall, Gill Terrett, Lucy Busija, Gemma Tatangelo, Skye N. McLennan, Nathan S. Rose, Matthias Kliegel, Julie D. Henry & Peter G. Rendell - 2020 - Cognition 202 (C):104305.
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  37. Population Size and the Rate of Language Evolution: A Test Across Indo-European, Austronesian, and Bantu Languages.Simon J. Greenhill, Xia Hua, Caela F. Welsh, Hilde Schneemann & Lindell Bromham - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  38.  84
    Epistemic unities.Simon J. Evnine - 2003 - Erkenntnis 59 (3):365 - 388.
    I bring together social ontology and social epistemology by consideringsocial entities (``epistemic unities'') that are constituted by the holdingof epistemic relations between their members. In particular, I focus onthe relation of taking someone as an expert. Among the types of structuresexamined are ones with a single expert and one or more non-experts whomay or may not know of each other's situation; and ones with more thanone expert, including cases in which the relation between the experts ishierarchical and cases in which (...)
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  39.  20
    Maximalising Providence: Samuel Rutherford's Augustinian Transformation of Scotist Scholasticism.Simon J. G. Burton - 2023 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 21 (2):151-172.
    In recent years evidence has emerged of the considerable influence of Scotist metaphysics on the Reformed scholasticism of the seventeenth century. One of the figures often named in connection with this Scotist revival is Samuel Rutherford (1600–61), who was one of the most important Scottish theologians of the seventeenth century. Focussing on Rutherford’s maximalist doctrine of providence, this article demonstrates his profound debt to key Scotist philosophical devices. In structuring these concepts, however, it is demonstrated that Rutherford is influenced not (...)
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  40. Containing Multitudes: Reflection, Expertise and Persons as Groups.Simon J. Evnine - 2005 - Episteme 2 (1):57-64.
    The thesis of the paper is that persons are similar to a kind of group: multiple-expert epistemic unities (MEUs). MEUs are groups in which there are multiple experts on whom other members of the group model their opinion. An example would be a group of children playing Telephone. Any child nearer the source is an 'expert' for any child further away. I argue that, with certain important qualifications, it is both rational and necessary for persons to treat their future selves (...)
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  41.  57
    Reactions toward the source of stimulation.J. Richard Simon - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):174.
  42.  33
    In a Secular Spirit: Strategies of Clinical Pastoral Education.Simon J. Craddock Lee - 2002 - Health Care Analysis 10 (4):339-356.
    The Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) model forthe provision of spiritual care represents theemergence of a secularized professionalpractice from a religiously-based theologicalpractice of chaplaincy. The transformation ofhospital chaplaincy into “spiritual careservices” is one means by which religioushealthcare ministry negotiates modernity, inthe particular forms of the secular realm ofbiomedicine and the pluralism of thecontemporary United States healthcaremarketplace. “Spiritual” is a labelstrategically deployed to extend the realm ofrelevance to any patient's “belief system,”regardless of his or her religious affiliation.“Theological” language is recast as a (...)
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  43.  80
    Can evolutionary psychology learn from the instinct debate?Simon J. Hampton - 2006 - History of the Human Sciences 19 (4):57-74.
    The concept of instinct espoused in psychology in the early 20th century and the contemporary concept of psychological adaptation invite comparison. Definitions of both employ the notions of inheritance, selection, functional specificity, and species typicality. This article examines how psychologists before the rise of behaviourism sought to establish instinct as a psychological phenomenon. One of the consequences of doing so was a decoupling of psychological and physiological forms of instinct. This led to a failure of constraint in the usage of (...)
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  44. Personhood and future belief: two arguments for something like Reflection.Simon J. Evnine - 2007 - Erkenntnis 67 (1):91-110.
    This paper offers two new arguments for a version of Reflection, the principle that says, roughly, that if one knew now what one would believe in the future, one ought to believe it now. The most prominent existing argument for the principle is the coherence-based Dutch Strategy argument advanced by Bas van Fraassen (and others). My two arguments are quite different. The first is a truth-based argument. On the basis of two substantive premises, that people’s beliefs generally get better over (...)
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  45.  25
    Illusory intuitions: Challenging the claim of non-exclusivity.Simon J. Handley, Omid Ghasemi & Michal Bialek - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e125.
    A person who arrives at correct solutions via false premises is right and wrong simultaneously. Similarly, a person who generates “logical intuitions” through superficial heuristics can likewise be right and wrong at the same time. However, heuristics aren't guaranteed to deliver the logical solution, so the claim that system 1 can routinely produce the alleged system 2 response is unfounded.
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    Adaptations for nothing in particular.Simon J. Hampton - 2004 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (1):35–53.
    An element of the contemporary dispute amongst evolution minded psychologists and social scientists hinges on the conception of mind as being adapted as opposed to adaptive. This dispute is not trivial. The possibility that human minds are both adapted and adaptive courtesy of selection pressures that were social in nature is of particular interest to a putative evolutionary social psychology. I suggest that the notion of an evolved psychological adaptation in social psychology can be retained only if it is accepted (...)
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  47. Kinds and conscious experience: Is there anything that it is like to be something?Simon J. Evnine - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (2):185–202.
    In this article I distinguish the notion of there being something it is like to be a certain kind of creature from that of there being something it is like to have a certain kind of experience. Work on consciousness has typically dealt with the latter while employing the language of the former. I propose several ways of analyzing what it is like to be a certain kind of creature and find problems with them all. The upshot is that even (...)
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  48.  13
    A body undressed for text: Trilby in parts.Simon J. James & Emma V. Miller - 2016 - Feminist Theory 17 (1):83-105.
    George Du Maurier’s best-selling novel, Trilby (1894), is as important because of its defiance of social and cultural norms as it is for its apparent compliance with them. Trilby is a fiction that, like its eponymous heroine, attempts to negotiate the perilously fine line between the highbrow and the lowbrow, or to put it another way, between fine art and political commentary on one side, and pornography and sensationalism on the other. This article examines the way that Du Maurier engages (...)
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  49.  23
    Legitimate and Ethical: Distinguishing When and How Regulations Apply in Patient-Oriented Research.Simon J. Craddock Lee, Jasmin A. Tiro, Wendy Pechero Bishop, P. Diane Sheppard & Celette Sugg Skinner - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (11):42-43.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 11, Page 42-43, November 2011.
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  50.  3
    Perspective: The Risks of Race in Addressing Health Disparities.Simon J. Craddock Lee - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4):c3-c3.
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