Results for 'Siam J. Comput'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Randomness and Recursive Enumerability.Siam J. Comput - unknown
    One recursively enumerable real α dominates another one β if there are nondecreasing recursive sequences of rational numbers (a[n] : n ∈ ω) approximating α and (b[n] : n ∈ ω) approximating β and a positive constant C such that for all n, C(α − a[n]) ≥ (β − b[n]). See [R. M. Solovay, Draft of a Paper (or Series of Papers) on Chaitin’s Work, manuscript, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, 1974, p. 215] and [G. J. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  38
    Shafi Goldwasser, Silvio Micali, and Charles Rackoff. The knowledge complexity of interactive proof systems. SIAM journal on computing, vol. 18 , pp. 186–208. - Oded Goldreich, Silvio Micali, and Avi Wigderson. Proofs that release minimum knowledge. Mathematical foundations of computer science 1986, Proceedings of the 12th symposium, Bratislava, Czechoslovakia, August 25–29, 1986, edited by J. Gruska, B. Rovan, and J. Wiedermann, Lecture notes in computer science, vol. 233, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, etc., 1986, pp. 639–650. - Oded Goldreich. Randomness, interactive proofs, and zero-knowledge—a survey. The universal Turing machine, A half-century survey, edited by Rolf Herken, Kammerer & Unverzagt, Hamburg and Berlin, and Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 1988, pp. 377–405. [REVIEW]Lance Fortnow - 1991 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (3):1092-1094.
  3. WEIZENBAUM, J., "Computer Power and Human Reason". [REVIEW]Alan Reeves - 1979 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 57:106.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. YAKOWITZ S. J. Computational Probability and Simulation. [REVIEW]B. de Finetti - 1977 - Scientia 71 (12):837.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Yakowitz S. J. Computational Probability And Simulation. [REVIEW]B. de Finetti - 1977 - Scientia 71 (112):837.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  9
    Review: J. McCarthy, Cicely M. Popplewell, Towards a Mathematical Science of Computation; John McCarthy, Wayne A. Kalenich, Problems in the Theory of Computation. [REVIEW]Richard J. Orgass - 1971 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (2):346-347.
  7.  16
    The Computer Comes of Age: The People, the Hardware, and the Software by Rene Moreau; J. Howlett; Engines of the Mind: A History of the Computer by Joel Shurkin.J. Bolter - 1985 - Isis 76:113-115.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  65
    J. C. Shepherdson. Algorithmic procedures, generalized Turing algorithms, and elementary recursion theory. Harvey Friedman's research on the foundations of mathematics, edited by L. A. Harrington, M. D. Morley, A. S̆c̆edrov, and S. G. Simpson, Studies in logic and the foundations of mathematics, vol. 117, North-Holland, Amsterdam, New York, and Oxford, 1985, pp. 285–308. - J. C. Shepherdson. Computational complexity of real functions. Harvey Friedman's research on the foundations of mathematics, edited by L. A. Harrington, M. D. Morley, A. S̆c̆edrov, and S. G. Simpson, Studies in logic and the foundations of mathematics, vol. 117, North-Holland, Amsterdam, New York, and Oxford, 1985, pp. 309–315. - A. J. Kfoury. The pebble game and logics of programs. Harvey Friedman's research on the foundations of mathematics, edited by L. A. Harrington, M. D. Morley, A. S̆c̆edrov, and S. G. Simpson, Studies in logic and the foundations of mathematics, vol. 117, North-Holland, Amsterdam, New York, an. [REVIEW]J. V. Tucker - 1990 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (2):876-878.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  7
    Michael J. Beeson. Computerizing mathematics: logic and computation. The universal Turing machine, A half-century survey, edited by Rolf Herken, Kammerer & Unverzagt, Hamburg and Berlin, and Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 1988. pp. 191–225. [REVIEW]J. C. Shepherdson - 1991 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (3):1090-1091.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  45
    McCarthy J.. Towards a mathematical science of computation. Information processing 1962, Proceedings oflFIP Congress 62, organized by the International Federation for Information Processing, Munich, 27 August-1 September 1962, edited by Popplewell Cicely M., North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam 1963, pp. 21–28.McCarthy John. Problems in the theory of computation. Information processing 1965, Proceedings of IFIP Congress 65, organized by the International Federation for Information Processing, New York City, May 24–29, 1965, Volume I, edited by Kalenich Wayne A., Spartan Books, Inc., Washington, D.C., and Macmillan and Co., Ltd., London, 1965, pp. 219–222. [REVIEW]Richard J. Orgass - 1971 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (2):346-347.
  11.  6
    Ash C. J. and Knight J.. Computable structures and the hyperarithmetical hierarchy. Studies in logic and the foundations of mathematics, vol. 144. Elsevier, Amsterdam etc. 2000, xv + 346 pp. [REVIEW]Valentina Harizanov - 2001 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 7 (3):383-385.
  12.  9
    Postley J. A.. A method for the evaluation of a system of Boolean algebraic equations. Mathematical tables and other aids to computation, vol. 9 , pp. 5–8. [REVIEW]Raymond J. Nelson - 1956 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 21 (3):335-335.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  77
    Computer Simulations, Machine Learning and the Laplacean Demon: Opacity in the Case of High Energy Physics.Florian J. Boge & Paul Grünke - forthcoming - In Andreas Kaminski, Michael Resch & Petra Gehring (eds.), The Science and Art of Simulation II.
    In this paper, we pursue three general aims: (I) We will define a notion of fundamental opacity and ask whether it can be found in High Energy Physics (HEP), given the involvement of machine learning (ML) and computer simulations (CS) therein. (II) We identify two kinds of non-fundamental, contingent opacity associated with CS and ML in HEP respectively, and ask whether, and if so how, they may be overcome. (III) We address the question of whether any kind of opacity, contingent (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14.  16
    Computable structures and the hyperarithmetical hierarchy.C. J. Ash - 2000 - New York: Elsevier. Edited by J. Knight.
    This book describes a program of research in computable structure theory. The goal is to find definability conditions corresponding to bounds on complexity which persist under isomorphism. The results apply to familiar kinds of structures (groups, fields, vector spaces, linear orderings Boolean algebras, Abelian p-groups, models of arithmetic). There are many interesting results already, but there are also many natural questions still to be answered. The book is self-contained in that it includes necessary background material from recursion theory (ordinal notations, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  15. Subsymbolic computation and the chinese room.David J. Chalmers - 1992 - In J. Dinsmore (ed.), The Symbolic and Connectionist Paradigms: Closing the Gap. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 25--48.
    More than a decade ago, philosopher John Searle started a long-running controversy with his paper “Minds, Brains, and Programs” (Searle, 1980a), an attack on the ambitious claims of artificial intelligence (AI). With his now famous _Chinese Room_ argument, Searle claimed to show that despite the best efforts of AI researchers, a computer could never recreate such vital properties of human mentality as intentionality, subjectivity, and understanding. The AI research program is based on the underlying assumption that all important aspects of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  16. The computational and the representational language-of-thought hypotheses.David J. Chalmers - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e269.
    There are two versions of the language-of-thought hypothesis (LOT): Representational LOT (roughly, structured representation), introduced by Ockham, and computational LOT (roughly, symbolic computation) introduced by Fodor. Like many others, I oppose the latter but not the former. Quilty-Dunn et al. defend representational LOT, but they do not defend the strong computational LOT thesis central to the classical-connectionist debate.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Computing in the nick of time.J. Brendan Ritchie & Colin Klein - 2023 - Ratio 36 (3):169-179.
    The medium‐independence of computational descriptions has shaped common conceptions of computational explanation. So long as our goal is to explain how a system successfully carries out its computations, then we only need to describe the abstract series of operations that achieve the desired input–output mapping, however they may be implemented. It is argued that this abstract conception of computational explanation cannot be applied to so‐called real‐time computing systems, in which meeting temporal deadlines imposed by the systems with which a device (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  13
    Stearns R. E., Hartmanis J., and Lewis P. M. II. Hierarchies of memory limited computations. Sixth Annual Symposium on Switching Circuit Theory and Logical Design, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., New York 1965, pp. 179–190. [REVIEW]Walter J. Savitch - 1972 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 37 (3):624-625.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  14
    Computers, Science, and Society. [REVIEW]M. V. J. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (3):554-555.
    F. H. George is Professor of Cybernetics at Brunel University in England. His book comprises eight chapters originally developed as lectures for a non-specialist audience. He points out the position of computer science among the sciences, explains its aims, procedures, and achievements to date, and speculates on its long-term implications for science in particular and society in general. Among the topics discussed are biological simulation and organ replacement, automated education, and the new philosophy of science. Each chapter concludes with a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  12
    The Computer Simulation of Behavior. [REVIEW]F. J. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 26 (1):149-150.
    Professor Apter has written a valuable book. His work, a non-technical introduction to the most important aspect of the use of computers in psychology, is simple, readable, yet surprisingly concentrated and provocative. His first two chapters contain an unusually clear, concise examination of the extent to which minds and machines can be compared. Although brief it successfully collates the work of famous scientists and scholars of varied disciplines into a coherent cybernetic theory. Chapter three is a simplified explanation of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Computational complexity and Godel's incompleteness theorem.Gregory J. Chaitin - 1970 - [Rio de Janeiro,: Centro Técnico Científico, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro. Edited by Gregory J. Chaitin.
  22.  16
    Murray F. J.. Mechanisms, and robots. Journal of the Association for Computing Machinery, vol. 2 , pp. 61–82.Raymond J. Nelson - 1956 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 21 (3):334-335.
  23.  11
    Dubucs, J., & Bourdeau, M. . Constructivity and Computability in Historical and Philosophical Perspective . Springer Netherlands, XI. 214, pp. ISBN: 978-94-017-9216-5 978-94-017-9217-2. [REVIEW]Bruno Da Ré - 2015 - Revista de Humanidades de Valparaíso 6:125-131.
    Book Review: Dubucs, J., & Bourdeau, M.. Constructivity and Computability in Historical and Philosophical Perspective. Springer Netherlands, XI. 214, pp. ISBN: 978-94-017-9216-5 978-94-017-9217-2, €83.29.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  7
    Review: R. E. Stearns, J. Hartmanis, P. M. Lewis, Hierarchies of Memory Limited Computations. [REVIEW]Walter J. Savitch - 1972 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 37 (3):624-625.
  25.  24
    Chalmers on implementation and computational sufficiency.J. Brendan Ritchie - unknown
    Chalmers argues for the following two principles: computational sufficiency and computational explanation. In this commentary I present two criticisms of Chalmers’ argument for the principle of computational sufficiency, which states that implementing the appropriate kind of computational structure suffices for possessing mentality. First, Chalmers only establishes that a system has its mental properties in virtue of the computations it performs in the trivial sense that any physical system can be described computationally to some arbitrary level of detail; further argumentation is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Review: J. C. Shepherdson, H. E. Sturgis, Computability of Recursive Functions. [REVIEW]Gunter Asser - 1967 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 32 (1):122-123.
  27.  25
    Review: J. Hartmanis, Context-free Languages and Turing Machine Computations. [REVIEW]S. Ginsburg - 1972 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 37 (4):759-759.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Review: J. Hartmanis, R. E. Stearns, Computational Complexity of Recursive Sequences. [REVIEW]Jiri Becvar - 1967 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 32 (1):121-122.
  29. Syntactic semantics: Foundations of computational natural language understanding.William J. Rapaport - 1988 - In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Aspects of AI. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This essay considers what it means to understand natural language and whether a computer running an artificial-intelligence program designed to understand natural language does in fact do so. It is argued that a certain kind of semantics is needed to understand natural language, that this kind of semantics is mere symbol manipulation (i.e., syntax), and that, hence, it is available to AI systems. Recent arguments by Searle and Dretske to the effect that computers cannot understand natural language are discussed, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  30.  53
    Computer Simulation Validation: Fundamental Concepts, Methodological Frameworks, and Philosophical Perspectives.Claus Beisbart & Nicole J. Saam (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This unique volume introduces and discusses the methods of validating computer simulations in scientific research. The core concepts, strategies, and techniques of validation are explained by an international team of pre-eminent authorities, drawing on expertise from various fields ranging from engineering and the physical sciences to the social sciences and history. The work also offers new and original philosophical perspectives on the validation of simulations. Topics and features: introduces the fundamental concepts and principles related to the validation of computer simulations, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  31. Do computer simulations support the Argument from Disagreement?Aron Vallinder & Erik J. Olsson - 2013 - Synthese 190 (8):1437-1454.
    According to the Argument from Disagreement (AD) widespread and persistent disagreement on ethical issues indicates that our moral opinions are not influenced by moral facts, either because there are no such facts or because there are such facts but they fail to influence our moral opinions. In an innovative paper, Gustafsson and Peterson (Synthese, published online 16 October, 2010) study the argument by means of computer simulation of opinion dynamics, relying on the well-known model of Hegselmann and Krause (J Artif (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  32. A Case Study on Computational Hermeneutics: E. J. Lowe’s Modal Ontological Argument.David Fuenmayor & Christoph Benzmueller - manuscript
    Computers may help us to better understand (not just verify) arguments. In this article we defend this claim by showcasing the application of a new, computer-assisted interpretive method to an exemplary natural-language ar- gument with strong ties to metaphysics and religion: E. J. Lowe’s modern variant of St. Anselm’s ontological argument for the existence of God. Our new method, which we call computational hermeneutics, has been particularly conceived for use in interactive-automated proof assistants. It aims at shedding light on the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  80
    Why computer simulations are not inferences, and in what sense they are experiments.Florian J. Boge - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 9 (1):1-30.
    The question of where, between theory and experiment, computer simulations (CSs) locate on the methodological map is one of the central questions in the epistemology of simulation (cf. Saam Journal for General Philosophy of Science, 48, 293–309, 2017). The two extremes on the map have them either be a kind of experiment in their own right (e.g. Barberousse et al. Synthese, 169, 557–574, 2009; Morgan 2002, 2003, Journal of Economic Methodology, 12(2), 317–329, 2005; Morrison Philosophical Studies, 143, 33–57, 2009; Morrison (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  34.  27
    Review: J.-J. Ch. Meyer, W. van Der Hoek, Epistemic Logic for AI and Computer Science. [REVIEW]Rineke Verbrugge - 1999 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 64 (4):1837-1840.
  35.  11
    Computable structures of rank.J. F. Knight & J. Millar - 2010 - Journal of Mathematical Logic 10 (1):31-43.
    For countable structure, "Scott rank" provides a measure of internal, model-theoretic complexity. For a computable structure, the Scott rank is at most [Formula: see text]. There are familiar examples of computable structures of various computable ranks, and there is an old example of rank [Formula: see text]. In the present paper, we show that there is a computable structure of Scott rank [Formula: see text]. We give two different constructions. The first starts with an arithmetical example due to Makkai, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  36.  38
    Brain–Computer Interfaces: Lessons to Be Learned from the Ethics of Algorithms.Andreas Wolkenstein, Ralf J. Jox & Orsolya Friedrich - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):635-646.
    :Brain–computer interfaces are driven essentially by algorithms; however, the ethical role of such algorithms has so far been neglected in the ethical assessment of BCIs. The goal of this article is therefore twofold: First, it aims to offer insights into whether the problems related to the ethics of BCIs can be better grasped with the help of already existing work on the ethics of algorithms. As a second goal, the article explores what kinds of solutions are available in that body (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  37. Semiotic Systems, Computers, and the Mind: How Cognition Could Be Computing.William J. Rapaport - 2012 - International Journal of Signs and Semiotic Systems 2 (1):32-71.
    In this reply to James H. Fetzer’s “Minds and Machines: Limits to Simulations of Thought and Action”, I argue that computationalism should not be the view that (human) cognition is computation, but that it should be the view that cognition (simpliciter) is computable. It follows that computationalism can be true even if (human) cognition is not the result of computations in the brain. I also argue that, if semiotic systems are systems that interpret signs, then both humans and computers are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  38. A.J. Kfoury, R.N. Moll, M.A. Arbib, "A Programming Approach to Computability". [REVIEW]M. Frixione - 1985 - Epistemologia 8 (1):185.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Review: J. Hartmanis, R. E. Stearns, On the Computational Complexity of Algorithms. [REVIEW]Jiri Becvar - 1967 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 32 (1):120-121.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  11
    Computational History of Philosophy of Science Dataset.Daniel J. Hicks, Rick Morris & Evelyn Brister - unknown
    The Computational History of Philosophy of Science Dataset aims to be a comprehensive set of article and book chapter metadata for philosophy of science. The dataset covers the full run of over 40 journals and 3 major book series in the field. An automated author disambiguation script is used to construct canonical names for each author, and a combination of gender attribution methods is used to attribute the gender of each author. The full code used to generate the dataset is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  10
    Provable computable selection functions on abstract structures.J. Tucker & J. Zucker - 1992 - In Peter Aczel, Harold Simmons & S. S. Wainer (eds.), Proof Theory: A Selection of Papers From the Leeds Proof Theory Programme, 1990. Cambridge University Press. pp. 275.
  42. Computational molecular biology: A promising application using logic programming and constraint logic programming.J. Cohen - 1999 - In P. Brezillon & P. Bouquet (eds.), Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence. Springer.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  4
    Computable structures of rank omega (ck)(1).J. F. Knight & J. Millar - 2010 - Journal of Mathematical Logic 10 (1):31-43.
    For countable structure, "Scott rank" provides a measure of internal, model-theoretic complexity. For a computable structure, the Scott rank is at most [Formula: see text]. There are familiar examples of computable structures of various computable ranks, and there is an old example of rank [Formula: see text]. In the present paper, we show that there is a computable structure of Scott rank [Formula: see text]. We give two different constructions. The first starts with an arithmetical example due to Makkai, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44.  18
    Computational semantics for monadic quantifiers in natural language.J. Szymanik - 2007 - Studia Semiotyczne 26:219-244.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Review: John McCarthy, Computer Programs for Checking Mathematical Proofs. [REVIEW]J. A. Robinson - 1967 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 32 (4):523-523.
  46. Computer knows best? The need for value-flexibility in medical AI.Rosalind J. McDougall - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (3):156-160.
    Artificial intelligence is increasingly being developed for use in medicine, including for diagnosis and in treatment decision making. The use of AI in medical treatment raises many ethical issues that are yet to be explored in depth by bioethicists. In this paper, I focus specifically on the relationship between the ethical ideal of shared decision making and AI systems that generate treatment recommendations, using the example of IBM’s Watson for Oncology. I argue that use of this type of system creates (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  47.  62
    The developmental programme – concept or muddle? Programmes for Development, Genes, Chromosomes and Computer Models in Developmental Biology_. Edited by Alma Swan, HERBERT Macgregor and Robert Ransom. _J. Embryol. Exp. Morph. Volume 83 Supplement. The Company of Biologists Ltd, Cambridge, 1984. Pp. 369. £12.00, $23.00. [REVIEW]J. Robert & S. Whittle - 1986 - Bioessays 5 (2):91-92.
  48.  81
    Computer processes and virtual persons: Comments on Cole's "artificial intelligence and personal identity".William J. Rapaport - 1990
    This is a draft of the written version of comments on a paper by David Cole, presented orally at the American Philosophical Association Central Division meeting in New Orleans, 27 April 1990. Following the written comments are 2 appendices: One contains a letter to Cole updating these comments. The other is the handout from the oral presentation.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  49.  8
    Review: J. A. Robinson, Theorem-Proving on the Computer. [REVIEW]David Luckham - 1966 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 31 (3):514-515.
  50.  81
    Analogue Computation and Representation.Corey J. Maley - 2023 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 74 (3):739-769.
    Relative to digital computation, analogue computation has been neglected in the philosophical literature. To the extent that attention has been paid to analogue computation, it has been misunderstood. The received view—that analogue computation has to do essentially with continuity—is simply wrong, as shown by careful attention to historical examples of discontinuous, discrete analogue computers. Instead of the received view, I develop an account of analogue computation in terms of a particular type of analogue representation that allows for discontinuity. This account (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000