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  1. Xiong Hun Yu Chen Yu.Shunqing Cao & Nan Wang - 2001
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  2. Ya Lun Yu Ya Su Zhi Bian.Shunqing Cao - 2005 - Bai Hua Zhou Wen Yi Chu Ban She.
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  3.  8
    Formations of World Literature(s) and Shaw's The Man of Destiny in Chinese and Japanese Translation.Shunqing Cao & Xin Chen - 2021 - Cultura 18 (1):55-70.
    In "Formations of World Literature and Shaw's The Man of Destiny in Chinese and Japanese Translation" Shunqing Cao and Xin Chen expand Franco Moretti's dictum that "world literature is not an object, it's a problem" to elaborate that the concept of world literature is in some sense a problematic one, which is itself under a process of problematization. Cao and Chen discuss how variation and heterogeneity contribute to a more in-depth understanding of formations of world literature. Taking the Bernar Shaw's (...)
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    The Variation of Chinese Literature and the Formation of World Literature.Shunqing Cao & Lu Zhai - 2022 - Cultura 19 (2):7-23.
    In "The Variation of Chinese Literature and the Formation of World Literature" Shunqing Cao and Lu Zhai discuss how Chinese works of literature entered other countries' literary circles through variation, and became an essential part of world literature. Both ancient Chinese literature and contemporary Chinese literature have undergone textual circulation, language translation and cultural filtering before becoming part of world literature, all of which are the reasons why literary variation occurs. According to Cao and Zhai, the occurrence of variation is (...)
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    Literary Syncretism and Variations in the Formation of World Literature.Shunqing Cao & Shuaidong Zhang - 2022 - Cultura 19 (2):105-114.
    If we inspect closely the works that ascend to world literature from the peripheral, David Damrosch’s well-recognized argument that “world literature is writing that gains in translation” may need some revision, because apparently translation is not the sole factor that decides the formation of world literature. Translated works do not necessarily represent the best part in one national literature. Damrosch’s overemphasis on translation differences and untranslatability in world literature tends to overlook the syncretism of heterogeneous literatures: The influence of Roman (...)
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