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  1.  77
    End-of-Life Decision-Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making.Udo Schüklenk, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Jocelyn Downie, Sheila A. M. Mclean, Ross Upshur & Daniel Weinstock - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (s1):1-73.
    ABSTRACTThis report on end‐of‐life decision‐making in Canada was produced by an international expert panel and commissioned by the Royal Society of Canada. It consists of five chapters.Chapter 1 reviews what is known about end‐of‐life care and opinions about assisted dying in Canada.Chapter 2 reviews the legal status quo in Canada with regard to various forms of assisted death.Chapter 3 reviews ethical issues pertaining to assisted death. The analysis is grounded in core values central to Canada's constitutional order.Chapter 4 reviews the (...)
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  2.  30
    Clinical Ethics Committees: a due process wasteland?Sheila A. M. McLean - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (2):99-104.
    The development of clinical ethic support in the UK arguably brings with it a series of legal questions, which need to be addressed. Most particularly, these concern questions of due process and formal justice, which I argue are central to the provision of appropriate ethical advice. In this article, I will compare the UK position with the more developed system in the USA, which often provides a template for development in the UK. While it is not argued that the provision (...)
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  3. Clinical Ethics Consultation in the United Kingdom.Sheila A. M. McLean - 2009 - Diametros 22:76 – 89.
    The system of clinical ethics committees (CECs) in the United Kingdom is based on goodwill. No formal requirements exist as to constitution, membership, range of expertise or the status of their recommendations. Healthcare professionals are not obliged to use CECs where they exist, nor to follow any advice received. In addition, the make-up of CECs suggests that ethics itself may be under-represented. In most cases, there is one member with a training in ethics – the rest are healthcare professionals or (...)
     
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  4. Decisions at the end of life : an attempt at rationalisation.Sheila A. M. McLean - 2015 - In Catherine Stanton, Sarah Devaney, Anne-Maree Farrell & Alexandra Mullock (eds.), Pioneering Healthcare Law: Essays in Honour of Margaret Brazier. Routledge.
     
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  5.  25
    Human Rights and Bioethics.Sheila A. M. McLean - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 658 (663):660.
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  6.  12
    Regulating Research and Experimentation: A View from the UK.Sheila A. M. McLean - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):604-612.
    A medical profession which did not seek improved means to conquer disease would be condemned for dereliction of its duty, Members of the public will not accept the current state of the medical arts as finite but feel justified in expecting the development of more effective therapies for illness, and the promotion of improved means of preventive care.With this assertion, the distinguished academic, Bernard Dickens, places research firmly in the domain of the public interest. Foster agrees, saying that, “[t]o improve (...)
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  7.  20
    Regulating Research and Experimentation: A View from the UK.Sheila A. M. McLean - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):604-612.
    A medical profession which did not seek improved means to conquer disease would be condemned for dereliction of its duty, Members of the public will not accept the current state of the medical arts as finite but feel justified in expecting the development of more effective therapies for illness, and the promotion of improved means of preventive care.With this assertion, the distinguished academic, Bernard Dickens, places research firmly in the domain of the public interest. Foster agrees, saying that, “[t]o improve (...)
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  8.  7
    Reasons to be Faithless.Sheila A. M. McLean - 2009-09-10 - In Russell Blackford & Udo Schüklenk (eds.), 50 Voices of Disbelief. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 165–167.
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