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Shawneequa L. Callier [10]Shawneequa Callier [3]
  1.  12
    Wrestling with Public Input on an Ethical Analysis of Scientific Research.Erik Parens, Michelle N. Meyer, Patrick Turley, Sandra Soo-Jin Lee, Nanibaa’ A. Garrison, Shawneequa L. Callier & Daphne Oluwaseun Martschenko - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (2):S50-S65.
    Bioethicists frequently call for empirical researchers to engage participants and community members in their research, but don't themselves typically engage community members in their normative research. In this article, we describe an effort to include members of the public in normative discussions about the risks, potential benefits, and ethical responsibilities of social and behavioral genomics (SBG) research. We reflect on what might—and might not— be gained from engaging the public in normative scholarship and on lessons learned about public perspectives on (...)
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  2.  24
    Wrestling with Social and Behavioral Genomics: Risks, Potential Benefits, and Ethical Responsibility.Michelle N. Meyer, Paul S. Appelbaum, Daniel J. Benjamin, Shawneequa L. Callier, Nathaniel Comfort, Dalton Conley, Jeremy Freese, Nanibaa' A. Garrison, Evelynn M. Hammonds, K. Paige Harden, Sandra Soo-Jin Lee, Alicia R. Martin, Daphne Oluwaseun Martschenko, Benjamin M. Neale, Rohan H. C. Palmer, James Tabery, Eric Turkheimer, Patrick Turley & Erik Parens - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (S1):2-49.
    In this consensus report by a diverse group of academics who conduct and/or are concerned about social and behavioral genomics (SBG) research, the authors recount the often‐ugly history of scientific attempts to understand the genetic contributions to human behaviors and social outcomes. They then describe what the current science—including genomewide association studies and polygenic indexes—can and cannot tell us, as well as its risks and potential benefits. They conclude with a discussion of responsible behavior in the context of SBG research. (...)
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  3.  19
    Trust, Precision Medicine Research, and Equitable Participation of Underserved Populations.Maya Sabatello, Shawneequa Callier, Nanibaa' A. Garrison & Elizabeth G. Cohn - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (4):34-36.
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  4.  10
    Diversity and Inclusion in Unregulated mHealth Research: Addressing the Risks.Shawneequa Callier & Stephanie M. Fullerton - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):115-121.
    mHealth devices and applications, with their wide accessibility and ease of use, have the potential to address persistent inequities in biomedical research participation. Yet, while mHealth technologies may facilitate more inclusive research participation, negative features of some unregulated use in research — misleading enrollment practices, the promotion of secondary mHealth applications, discriminatory profiling, and poorer quality feedback due to dependencies on biased data and algorithms — may threaten the trust and engagement of underrepresented individuals and communities. To maximize the participation (...)
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  5.  44
    Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Personalized Genomic Medicine Research: Current Literature and Suggestions for the Future.Shawneequa L. Callier, Rachel Abudu, Maxwell J. Mehlman, Mendel E. Singer, Duncan Neuhauser, Charlisse Caga-Anan & Georgia L. Wiesner - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (9):698-705.
    Purpose: This review identifies the prominent topics in the literature pertaining to the ethical, legal, and social issues raised by research investigating personalized genomic medicine. Methods: The abstracts of 953 articles extracted from scholarly databases and published during a 5-year period were reviewed. A total of 299 articles met our research criteria and were organized thematically to assess the representation of ELSI issues for stakeholders, health specialties, journals, and empirical studies. Results: ELSI analyses were published in both scientific and ethics (...)
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  6.  18
    Taking a Stand: The Genetics Community's Responsibility for Intelligence Research.Shawneequa L. Callier & Vence L. Bonham - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (S1):54-58.
    There is a longstanding debate about genetics research into intelligence. Some scholars question the value of focusing on genetic contributions to intelligence in a society where social and environmental determinants powerfully influence cognitive ability and educational outcomes. Others warn that censoring certain research questions, such as inquiries about genetic differences in intellectual potential, compromises academic freedom. Still others view interest in this subject as a corollary to a long and troublesome history of eugenics research. The dawn of a new era (...)
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  7. How anonymous is 'anonymous'? Some suggestions towards a coherent universal coding system for genetic samples.Harald Schmidt & Shawneequa Callier - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):304-309.
    So-called ‘anonymous’ tissue samples are widely used in research. Because they lack externally identifying information, they are viewed as useful in reconciling conflicts between the control, privacy and confidentiality interests of those from whom the samples originated and the public (or commercial) interest in carrying out research, as reflected in ‘consent or anonymise’ policies. High level guidance documents suggest that withdrawal of consent and samples and the provision of feedback are impossible in the case of anonymous samples. In view of (...)
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  8.  25
    Swabbing Students: Should Universities Be Allowed to Facilitate Educational DNA Testing?Shawneequa L. Callier - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (4):32-40.
    Recognizing the profound need for greater patient and provider familiarity with personalized genomic medicine, many university instructors are including personalized genotyping as part of their curricula. During seminars and lectures students run polymerase chain reactions on their own DNA or evaluate their experiences using direct-to-consumer genetic testing services subsidized by the university. By testing for genes that may influence behavioral or health-related traits, however, such as alcohol tolerance and cancer susceptibility, certain universities have stirred debate on the ethical concerns raised (...)
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  9.  32
    Managing Patient Expectations About Deidentification.Harald Schmidt & Shawneequa L. Callier - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (9):21-23.
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  10.  17
    The Slippery Slope of Prenatal Testing for Social Traits.Courtney Canter, Kathleen Foley, Shawneequa L. Callier, Karen M. Meagher, Margaret Waltz, Aurora Washington, R. Jean Cadigan, Anya E. R. Prince & the Beyond the Medical R01 Research Team - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (3):36-38.
    Bowman-Smart et al. (2023) argue for a framework to examine the ethical issues associated with genetic screening for non-medical traits in the context of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). Such s...
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  11.  29
    GINA and Preemployment Criminal Background Checks.Shawneequa L. Callier, John Huss & Eric T. Juengst - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (1):15-19.
  12.  46
    Herbert J. Bonifacio is an adolescent.Shawneequa L. Callier, Christine Grady & Michael L. Gross - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  13.  26
    Genomic Test Results and the Courtroom: The Roles of Experts and Expert Testimony.Edward Ramos, Shawneequa L. Callier, Peter B. Swann & Hosea H. Harvey - 2016 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 44 (1):205-215.
    The rapid advancement from single-gene testing to whole genome sequencing has significantly broadened the type and amount of information available to researchers, physicians, patients, and the public in general. Much debate has ensued about whether genomic test results should be reported to research participants, patients and consumers, and at what stage we can be sure that existing evidence justifies their use in clinical settings. Courts and judges evaluating the utility of these results will not be immune to this uncertainty. As (...)
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