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Shawn D. Kaplan [3]Shawn Daniel Kaplan [1]
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Shawn Kaplan
Adelphi University
  1.  45
    Beyond Positive and Negative Liberty: Samuel Fleischacker’s Personal Freedom of Judgment.Shawn D. Kaplan - 2001 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 22 (2):165-183.
    It is widely acknowledged that Isaiah Berlin’s seminal essay “Two Concepts of Liberty” has to a large extent set the tone and determined the content of the debates within political philosophy in the English-speaking world. Berlin maintains that the conceptual and institutional history of liberty can be understood in terms of the various responses to the logically distinct questions: “Who governs me?” and “How far does government interfere with me?”. In Berlin’s first question, the salient issue is whether the valid (...)
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  2.  72
    A Critique of the Practical Contradiction Procedure for Testing Maxims.Shawn D. Kaplan - 2005 - Kantian Review 10:112-127.
    Emerging from the growing swell of recent literature concerning Kant's practical philosophy, one interpretation of his procedure for testing maxims has crested above others. The influential interpretation to which I refer believes that the categorical imperative guides a procedure that finds maxims impermissible when they cannot be universalized without producing a 'practical' contradiction. As a major proponent of the practical contradiction interpretation, Christine Korsgaard claims that, while there is textual support for this point of view, she is more concerned with (...)
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  3.  19
    Beyond Positive and Negative Liberty: Samuel Fleischacker’s Personal Freedom of Judgment.Shawn D. Kaplan - 2000 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 22 (2):165-184.
    It is widely acknowledged that Isaiah Berlin’s seminal essay “Two Concepts of Liberty” has to a large extent set the tone and determined the content of the debates within political philosophy in the English-speaking world. Berlin maintains that the conceptual and institutional history of liberty can be understood in terms of the various responses to the logically distinct questions: “Who governs me?” and “How far does government interfere with me?”. In Berlin’s first question, the salient issue is whether the valid (...)
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