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  1.  50
    Children's Participation: An Arendtian criticism.Sharon Jessop - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (9):979-996.
    Hannah Arendt's critique of education in 1950s USA provides an important way of understanding the development of citizenship education. Her theory on the nature of childhood and her concepts of natality and authority give insight into both the directions of current policies and practices, and the possible future states into which these elements may crystallise. It is argued that education for citizenship is an expression of the hope that children will ‘save’ us from ourselves and that there are two distinct (...)
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  2. Education for Citizenship and ‘Ethical Life’: An Exploration of the Hegelian Concepts of Bildung and Sittlichkeit.Sharon Jessop - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):287-302.
    The significance of German Romantic and Hegelian philosophy for educational practice is not attended to as much as it deserves to be, both as a matter of historical interest and of current importance. In particular, its role in shaping the thought of John Dewey, whose educational philosophy is of seminal importance for discussions on education for citizenship, is of considerable interest, as recent work by Jim Garrison () and James Good has shown. This article focuses on the Hegelian concepts of (...)
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  3.  18
    Adorno: Cultural Education and Resistance.Sharon Jessop - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (4):409-423.
    In recent years, culture has become significantly politicized, or conspicuously de-politicized, in different parts of the UK, making its appearance in education policy of pivotal interest and ripe for critical attention. From the vantage point of Theodor Adorno’s work on the culture industry and his writings on the work of the teacher, I argue that cultural education is a site where something crucial and distinctive takes place. Within the Enlightenment tradition, critical self-reflection and resistance to heteronymous ways of thinking are (...)
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  4.  17
    Children, Redemption and Remembrance in Walter Benjamin.Sharon Jessop - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):642-657.
    Walter Benjamin wrote extensively on children and childhood, though this aspect of his work has hitherto received scant attention despite continuing and growing interest in his thought. This article makes explicit the connection between his acute observations of childhood and his distinctive messianic philosophy. The twin aspects of redemption in Benjamin's writings: remembrance and now-time, as illustrated in Wim Wender's Wings of Desire, are explored in relation to the ‘task of childhood’. Benjamin asserts the emancipatory potential held within the development (...)
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