Results for 'Shagbark Hickory'

8 found
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  1.  24
    Everyday Environmental Ethics as Comedy & Story: A Collage.Shagbark Hickory - 2003 - Ethics and the Environment 8 (2):80-105.
    : In Section I, I provide a brief historical sketch of tragedy and its relationship to Socratic philosophy and comedy. II focuses on one aspect of tragedy, namely, its view that morality transcends natural limitations. This understanding of morality is with us still. III presents the central concerns of the world religions as evidence of a widespread feeling of alienation from the sacred and the wild, and contrasts world religions with indigenous spirituality. IV moves us away from the understanding of (...)
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    Everyday Environmental Ethics as Comedy & Story:A Collage.Shagbark Hickory - 2003 - Ethics and the Environment 8 (2):80-105.
    In Section I, I provide a brief historical sketch of tragedy and its relationship to Socratic philosophy and comedy. II focuses on one aspect of tragedy, namely, its view that morality transcends natural limitations. This understanding of morality is with us still. III presents the central concerns of the world religions as evidence of a widespread feeling of alienation from the sacred and the wild, and contrasts world religions with indigenous spirituality. IV moves us away from the understanding of philosophy (...)
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  3.  3
    Hickory Stick Hierarchy.Len G. Selle - 1979 - Educational Studies 10 (2):174-174.
  4.  22
    A Critical (and Cautiously Optimistic) Appraisal of Moerman's "Meaning Response".Marco Annoni & Charlotte Blease - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 61 (3):379-387.
    Shamans, healers, and doctors have always known that patients may improve even if no real therapy is administered. In the Charmides, Plato noted that to soothe a headache, one needed "a kind of leaf, which required to be accompanied by a charm, and if a person would repeat the charm at the same time he used the cure, he would be made whole; but that without the charm would be of no avail". Similarly, more than two millennia later, Thomas Jefferson (...)
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  5. Erratum To: The Myth of Efficiency: Technology and Ethics in Industrial Food Production. [REVIEW]Diana Stuart & Michelle R. Worosz - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):257-257.
    Abstract In this paper, we explore how the application of technological tools has reshaped food production systems in ways that foster large-scale outbreaks of foodborne illness. Outbreaks of foodborne illness have received increasing attention in recent years, resulting in a growing awareness of the negative impacts associated with industrial food production. These trends indicate a need to examine systemic causes of outbreaks and how they are being addressed. In this paper, we analyze outbreaks linked to ground beef and salad greens. (...)
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  6.  7
    The Placebo Phenomenon: A Narrow Focus on Psychological Models.Nathalie Peiris, Maxie Blasini, Thelma Wright & Luana Colloca - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 61 (3):388-400.
    One of the most successful physicians I have ever known, has assured me, that he used more bread pills, drops of colored water, and powders of hickory ashes, than of all other medicines put together. It was certainly a pious fraud.Clinicians and other health-care practitioners have known for hundreds of years that different procedures with unclear mechanisms of action or efficaciousness can still result in subjective improvement of clinical symptoms. Many scholars have attempted to define the placebo effect. This (...)
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  7.  19
    Americanized Comic Braggarts.Walter Blair - 1977 - Critical Inquiry 4 (2):331-349.
    During nearly two centuries, American storytellers have celebrated comic figures, ebullient showoffs who turned up on one frontier after another—in the old South, in Kentucky and Tennessee, along the great inland rivers, in the mountains and the mines and on the prairies. Often, the stories went, when these characters engaged in a favorite pastime—playfully bragging about their strength, their skill and their exploits—they used animal metaphors such as Opossum, Screamer, Half-Horse Half-Alligator, the Big Bear of Arkansas or Gamecock of the (...)
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  8.  6
    Editors' Introduction to Special Section on Meaning Response and the Placebo Effect.Charlotte Blease, Marco Annoni & Phil Hutchinson - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 61 (3):349-352.
    Over 200 years ago, doctors' most effective tools were typically not found in their medical bags. Indeed, most treatments in the history of medicine have, until relatively recently, caused more harm than good. Prior to the biomedical revolution in the late 19th century, doctors' most reliable and effective instruments of healing were their skills of communication with patients and an aptitude for a positive and supportive bedside manner. Bearing out this portrait of medicine, Thomas Jefferson, writing in 1807, noted that (...)
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