39 found
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  1.  11
    Socrates' Second Sailing: On Plato's Republic.Seth Benardete - 1992 - University of Chicago Press.
    This book provides a fresh interpretation of the Republic and a new understanding of philosophy as practiced by Plato and Socrates.
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  2. The Being of the Beautiful: Plato's Theaetetus, Sophist, and Statesman.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 1984 - University of Chicago Press.
    _The Being of the Beautiful_ collects Plato’s three dialogues, the _Theaetetus_, _Sophist_, and _Statesmen_, in which Socrates formulates his conception of philosophy while preparing for trial. Renowned classicist Seth Benardete’s careful translations clearly illuminate the dramatic and philosophical unity of these dialogues and highlight Plato’s subtle interplay of language and structure. Extensive notes and commentaries, furthermore, underscore the trilogy’s motifs and relationships. “The translations are masterpieces of literalness.... They are honest, accurate, and give the reader a wonderful sense of the (...)
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  3.  4
    Socrates' Second Sailing: On Plato's Republic.Seth Benardete - 1989 - University of Chicago Press.
    In this section-by-section commentary, Benardete argues that Plato's _Republic_ is a holistic analysis of the beautiful, the good, and the just. This book provides a fresh interpretation of the _Republic_ and a new understanding of philosophy as practiced by Plato and Socrates. "Cryptic allusions, startling paradoxes, new questions... all work to give brilliant new insights into the Platonic text."—Arlene W. Saxonhouse, _Political Theory_.
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  4.  36
    The Argument of the Action: Essays on Greek Poetry and Philosophy.Seth Benardete - 2000 - University of Chicago Press.
    This volume brings together Seth Benardete's studies of Hesiod's Theogony, Homer's Iliad, and Greek tragedy, of eleven Platonic dialogues, and Aristotle's Metaphysics. These essays, some never before published, others difficult to find, span four decades of his work and document its impressive range. Benardete's philosophic reading of the poets and his poetic reading of the philosophers share a common ground that makes this collection a whole. The key, suggested by his reflections on Leo Strauss in the last piece, lies in (...)
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  5. The Rhetoric of Morality and Philosophy: Plato’s “Gorgias” and “Phaedrus”.Seth Benardete - 1991 - University of Chicago Press.
    Benardete here interprets and, for the first time, pairs two important Platonic dialogues, the Gorgias and the Phaedrus . In linking these dialogues, he places Socrates' notion of rhetoric in a new light and illuminates the way in which Plato gives morality and eros a place in the human soul.
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  6.  2
    The Tragedy and Comedy of Life: Plato's Philebus.Seth BENARDETE (ed.) - 1993 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _The Tragedy and Comedy of Life,_ Seth Benardete focuses on the idea of the good in what is widely regarded as one of Plato's most challenging and complex dialogues, the _Philebus._ Traditionally the _Philebus_ is interpreted as affirming the doctrine that the good resides in thought and mind rather than in pleasure or the body. Benardete challenges this view, arguing that Socrates vindicates the life of the mind over the life of pleasure not by separating the two and advocating (...)
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  7.  49
    Plato’s “Laws”: The Discovery of Being.Seth Benardete - 2000 - University of Chicago Press.
    The Laws was Plato's last work, his longest, and one of his most difficult. In contrast to the Republic, which presents an abstract ideal not intended for any actual community, the Laws seems to provide practical guidelines for the establishment and maintenance of political order in the real world. With this book, the distinguished classicist Seth Benardete offers an insightful analysis and commentary on this rich and complex dialogue. Each of the chapters corresponds to one of the twelve books of (...)
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  8. The Tragedy and Comedy of Life: Plato's Philebus.Seth BENARDETE (ed.) - 1993 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _The Tragedy and Comedy of Life,_ Seth Benardete focuses on the idea of the good in what is widely regarded as one of Plato's most challenging and complex dialogues, the _Philebus._ Traditionally the _Philebus_ is interpreted as affirming the doctrine that the good resides in thought and mind rather than in pleasure or the body. Benardete challenges this view, arguing that Socrates vindicates the life of the mind over the life of pleasure not by separating the two and advocating (...)
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  9.  50
    Aristotle, De Anima III.3-5.Seth Benardete - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (4):611 - 622.
    The physicist defines anger in terms of heart, blood, and heat; the dialectician says it is the desire to inflict pain in retaliation. Both give fairly sure signs for its recognition; but neither can show why these signs must go together and in what they can cohere. Aristotelian physics is presumably a way to avoid such a split, and whatever defects his account of perception or intellection suffers from cannot be traced to it. Phantasia, however, seems to be dialectically distinguished (...)
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  10.  51
    Some Misquotations of Homer in Plato.Seth Benardete - 1963 - Phronesis 8 (1):173-178.
  11.  60
    Plato's Sophist: The Drama of Original and Image, by Stanley Rosen. [REVIEW]Seth Benardete - 1985 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 10 (2):167-171.
  12.  60
    On Plato's Sophist.Seth Benardete - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (4):747 - 780.
    In the first part, it is argued that the Stranger has employed in his divisions both eikastic and phantastic speech, and that the issue of being arises because Theaetetus fails to recognize Socrates as the philosopher. In the second part, it is argued that phantastic speech as the experience of eikastic speech is false opinion, and that the double account of logos, as the weaving together of species and of agent and action, corresponds respectively to that which makes speech possible, (...)
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  13. Cicero's De Legibus I: Its Plan and Intention.Seth Benardete - 1987 - American Journal of Philology 108 (2):295-309.
  14. Freedom : Grace and Necessity.Seth Benardete - 2007 - In Richard L. Velkley (ed.), Freedom and the Human Person. Catholic University of America Press.
     
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  15. Leo Strauss on Plato's Symposium.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 2003 - University of Chicago Press.
    The first major piece of unpublished work by Leo Strauss to appear in more than thirty years, this volume offers the public the unprecedented experience of encountering this renowned scholar as his students did. Given as a course in autumn 1959 under the title "Plato's Political Philosophy," these provocative lectures—until now, never published, but instead passed down from one generation of students to the next—show Strauss at his subtle and insightful best.
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  16.  1
    Leo Strauss on Plato's Symposium.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    The first major piece of unpublished work by Leo Strauss to appear in more than thirty years, this volume offers the public the unprecedented experience of encountering this renowned scholar as his students did. Given as a course in autumn 1959 under the title "Plato's Political Philosophy," these provocative lectures—until now, never published, but instead passed down from one generation of students to the next—show Strauss at his subtle and insightful best.
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  17. Plato's Symposium: A Translation by Seth Benardete with Commentaries by Allan Bloom and Seth Benardete.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    Plato, Allan Bloom wrote, is "the most erotic of philosophers," and his Symposium is one of the greatest works on the nature of love ever written. This new edition brings together the English translation of the renowned Plato scholar and translator, Seth Benardete, with two illuminating commentaries on it: Benardete's "On Plato's _Symposium_" and Allan Bloom's provocative essay, "The Ladder of Love." In the _Symposium,_ Plato recounts a drinking party following an evening meal, where the guests include the poet Aristophanes, (...)
     
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  18.  4
    Sacred Transgressions: A Reading of Sophocles' Antigone.Seth Benardete - 2014 - St. Augustine's Press.
    This detailed commentary on the action and argument of Sophocles' Antigone is meant to be a reflection on and response to Hegel's interpretation in the Phenomenology. It thus moves within the principles Hegel discovers in the play but reinserts them into the play as they show themselves across the eccentricities of its plot. Wherever plot and principles do not match, there is a glimmer of the argument: Haemon speaks up for the city and Tiresias for the divine law but neither (...)
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  19.  1
    The Archaeology of the Soul: Platonic Readings in Ancient Poetry and Philosophy.Seth Benardete - 2012 - St. Augustine's Press.
    The Archaeology of the Soul is a testimony to the extraordinary scope of Seth Benardete's thought. Some essays concern particular authors or texts; others range more broadly and are thematic. Some deal explicitly with philosophy; others deal with epic, lyric, and tragic poetry. Some of these authors are Greek, some Roman, and still others are contemporaries writing about antiquity. All of these essays, however, are informed by an underlying vision, which is a reflection of Benardete's life-long engagement with one thinker (...)
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  20.  11
    The Bow and the Lyre: A Platonic Reading of the Odyssey.Seth Benardete - 1996 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this interpretation of the Odyssey, Seth Benardete suggests that Homer may have been the first to philosophize in a Platonic sense. He argues that the Odyssey concerns precisely the relation between philosophy and poetry and, more broadly, the rational and the irrational in human beings.
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  21. The Bow and the Lyre: A Platonic Reading of the Odyssey.Seth Benardete - 1996 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this interpretation of the Odyssey, Seth Benardete suggests that Homer may have been the first to philosophize in a Platonic sense. He argues that the Odyssey concerns precisely the relation between philosophy and poetry and, more broadly, the rational and the irrational in human beings.
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  22. Tragedia i komedia życia.Seth Benardete - 2008 - Kronos - metafizyka, kultura, religia 2 (2):61-64.
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  23.  41
    The Tragedy and Comedy of Life: Plato's Philebus. Plato & Seth Benardete - 2009 - University of Chicago Press.
    In The Tragedy and Comedy of Life, Seth Benardete focuses on the idea of the good in what is widely regarded as one of Plato's most challenging and complex dialogues, the Philebus.
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  24.  44
    The Plan of Odysseus and the Plot of the Philoctetes.Seth Benardete - 2003 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):133-150.
  25.  32
    Allan, William. The Andromache and Euripidean Tragedy. Oxford Classical Mono-Graphs. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Xii+ 310 Pp. Cloth, $70. Allen, James P. Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Xiv+ 510 Pp. Numer-Ous Ills. 1 Map. Cloth, $74.95; Paper, $29.95. [REVIEW]Seth Benardete & Richard Bodéüs - 2001 - American Journal of Philology 122:151-154.
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  26.  29
    Plato’s Theaetetus: On the Way of the Logos.Seth Benardete - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 51 (1):25 - 53.
    THE OPENING OF THE THEAETETUS is curious. The report we have of another opening of nearly the same length indicates that it was always a curiosity. If both openings are Plato’s, and the rest of the dialogue they preface were not different, then Plato changed his mind about how to start off the trilogy to which the Theaetetus belongs. If the second version is spurious, someone thought he could surpass Plato and make a more sensible introduction. If ours is spurious, (...)
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  27.  39
    On Interpreting Plato’s Charmides.Seth Benardete - 1986 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 11 (2):9-36.
  28.  28
    Gott Und "Theoria" Bei Aristoteles: Die Metaphysische Grundlage der Nikomachischen Ethik. [REVIEW]Seth Benardete - 1983 - Review of Metaphysics 37 (1):112-113.
    This short book, a German translation of an unpublished English version, with 95 pages of text and 114 of notes, consists of three main chapters: I. The nature of the complete human life is similar to the nature of God's; II. The activity of the complete human being resembles that of God; III. The function of god in the Nicomachean Ethics. Its author tries to show that it is possible to assign, in a strictly Aristotelian way, a metaphysical ground to (...)
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  29.  28
    On Heraclitus.Seth Benardete - 2000 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (3):613 - 633.
    LUCRETIUS, AFTER HE HAS EXPOUNDED THAT NOTHING comes out of nothing and nothing goes into nothing, and there are only bodies and void, turns to three pre-Socratics: Heraclitus, Empedocles, and Anaxagoras. He characterizes Heraclitus, clarus ob obscuram linguam, as having a bright principle and a dark account; he says of Empedocles, than whom Sicily nil... habuisse praeclarius... videtur, that his principles are as bright as his song about them; and he says of Anaxagoras, who must resort to quaedam latitandi copia (...)
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  30.  28
    The Grammar of Being.Seth Benardete - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (3):486 - 496.
  31.  23
    The First Crisis in First Philosophy.Seth Benardete - 1995 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 18 (1):237-248.
    Virtually everyone knows that Aristotle sometimes lies. His account of the pre-Socratics in the first book of the Metaphysics leaves out of account everything that does not suit his scheme, the gradual disclosure of the four causes, compelled, as he says, by the truth itself. Heraclitus’ fire is there but not Heraclitus’ logos. Parmenides’ Eros is there but not Parmenides’ mind. This triumphant progress, however, comes abruptly to an end at the end of Book I, and Book II begins the (...)
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  32.  37
    Plato’s Theaetetus: On the Way of the Logos.Seth Benardete - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 51 (1):25-53.
    THE OPENING OF THE THEAETETUS is curious. The report we have of another opening of nearly the same length indicates that it was always a curiosity. If both openings are Plato’s, and the rest of the dialogue they preface were not different, then Plato changed his mind about how to start off the trilogy to which the Theaetetus belongs. If the second version is spurious, someone thought he could surpass Plato and make a more sensible introduction. If ours is spurious, (...)
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  33.  42
    Physics and Tragedy: On Plato’s Cratylus.Seth Benardete - 1981 - Ancient Philosophy 1 (2):127-140.
  34. Plato's Statesman: Part Iii of the Being of the Beautiful.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 1986 - University of Chicago Press.
    _Theaetetus_, the _Sophist_, and the _Statesman_ are a trilogy of Platonic dialogues that show Socrates formulating his conception of philosophy as he prepares the defense for his trial. Originally published together as _The Being of the Beautiful_, these translations can be read separately or as a trilogy. Each includes an introduction, extensive notes, and comprehensive commentary that examines the trilogy's motifs and relationships. "Seth Benardete is one of the very few contemporary classicists who combine the highest philological competence with a (...)
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  35. Plato's Sophist: Part Ii of the Being of the Beautiful.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 1986 - University of Chicago Press.
    _Theaetetus_, the _Sophist_, and the _Statesman_ are a trilogy of Platonic dialogues that show Socrates formulating his conception of philosophy as he prepares the defense for his trial. Originally published together as _The Being of the Beautiful_, these translations can be read separately or as a trilogy. Each includes an introduction, extensive notes, and comprehensive commentary that examines the trilogy's motifs and relationships. "Seth Benardete is one of the very few contemporary classicists who combine the highest philological competence with a (...)
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  36.  3
    Plato's Theaetetus: Part I of the Being of the Beautiful.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 1986 - University of Chicago Press.
    _Theaetetus_, the _Sophist_, and the _Statesman_ are a trilogy of Platonic dialogues that show Socrates formulating his conception of philosophy as he prepares the defense for his trial. Originally published together as _The Being of the Beautiful_, these translations can be read separately or as a trilogy. Each includes an introduction, extensive notes, and comprehensive commentary that examines the trilogy's motifs and relationships. "Seth Benardete is one of the very few contemporary classicists who combine the highest philological competence with a (...)
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  37.  8
    Gott und.Seth Benardete - 1983 - Review of Metaphysics 37 (1):112-113.
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  38.  23
    On Wisdom and Philosophy: The First Two Chapters of Aristotle’s Metaphysics A.Seth Benardete - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (2):205 - 215.
    Aristotle begins not with the question of being but with its correlative, the question of knowledge and wisdom. This question is the substitute for the lack of anything self-evidently prior to that which metaphysics itself establishes. The theme of the first chapter is delight and admiration—the delight we ourselves take in any effortless acquisition of knowledge, and the admiration we grant to anyone who is manifestly superior to ourselves in knowledge. That which unites that kind of delight with this kind (...)
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  39.  2
    The Grammar of BeingThe Verb "Be" in Ancient Greek. [REVIEW]Seth Benardete - 1977 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (3):486-496.
    Whatever one may think of Schmidt’s intuition, it is still nothing but intuition, and the variety of syntactic structures which εἶναι admits of is neither articulated nor unified. Kahn, on the other hand, by the use of Transformational Grammar, is able to a large extent to generate in a regular way from a posited notion of "kernel sentence" all the Greek sentences in which εἶναι occurs. Kahn’s original plan was "to correlate every intuitive difference of meaning in the use of (...)
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