8 found
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  1. Ovidio E la preconoscenza Della critica qualche generalizzazione a partire da heroides 14.Sergio Casali - 1998 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 142 (1):94-113.
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  2.  24
    Reading After Actium: Vergil's Georgics, Octavian, and Rome (review).Sergio Casali - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (4):611-615.
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  3.  27
    Not By Ovid? W. Lingenberg: Das erste Buch der Heroidenbriefe. Echtheitskritische Untersuchungen . (Studien zur Geschichte und Kultur des Altertums, Neue Folge, 1. Reihe, Band 20.) Pp. 334. Paderborn, Munich, Vienna, and Zürich: Ferdinand Schöningh, 2003. Paper, €46. ISBN: 3-506-79070-. [REVIEW]Sergio Casali - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (02):530-.
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  4.  4
    Porsenna, horatius cyclops, and cloelia.Sergio Casali - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (2):724-733.
    The fifth scene represented on the Shield of Aeneas describes Porsenna's siege of Rome and the resistance of the Romans, with the two classic exempla of Horatius Cocles and Cloelia :nec non Tarquinium eiectum Porsenna iubebataccipere ingentique urbem obsidione premebat;Aeneadae in ferrum pro libertate ruebant.illum indignanti similem similemque minantiaspiceres, pontem auderet quia uellere Cocles 650et fluuium uinclis innaret Cloelia ruptis.According to Roman mainstream tradition, at the beginning of the Republic, Porsenna, an Etruscan king of Clusium, tried to reinstate the exiled (...)
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  5.  7
    Hydra Redundans (Ovid, Heroides 9.95).Sergio Casali - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (02):505-.
    Deianira complains that Hercules, as a slave of Omphale, did not refrain from telling to the Lydian queen his famous labours; among them, the Hydra: quaeque redundabat fecundo vulnere serpens fertilis et damnis dives ab ipsa suis ‘It will be admitted that redundabat, which usually means to “overflow”’ can only be applied to the Hydra by a very strong metaphor; but it is not only a strong one, it is quite unexampled: so A. Palmer in The Academy 49 , 160. (...)
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  6.  21
    Facta impia (Virgil, Aeneid 4.596–9).Sergio Casali - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (01):203-211.
    Dawn. Aeneas has just left. As soon as Dido notices that the Trojan fleet is sailing far away from Carthage she is overcome by despair and launches into an enraged monologue , which climaxes in her curse against Aeneas and all of his descendants . In the first part of the monologue Dido reproaches herself for how she has dealt with Aeneas.
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  7.  1
    Elective Affinities: The Harvard School at Pisa at the End of the Eighties.Sergio Casali - 2017 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 111 (1):55-57.
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  8.  48
    The King of pain: Aeneas, achates and ‘achos' in aeneid 1.Sergio Casali - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (1):181-189.