26 found
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  1. The path toward ectogenesis: looking beyond the technical challenges.Seppe Segers - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-15.
    BackgroundBreakthroughs in animal studies make the topic of human application of ectogenesis for medical and non-medical purposes more relevant than ever before. While current data do not yet demonstrate a reasonable expectation of clinical benefit soon, several groups are investigating the feasibility of artificial uteri for extracorporeal human gestation.Main textThis paper offers the first comprehensive and up to date discussion of the most important pros and cons of human ectogenesis in light of clinical application, along with an examination of crucial (...)
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  2.  48
    The curious case of “trust” in the light of changing doctor–patient relationships.Seppe Segers & Heidi Mertes - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (8):849-857.
    The centrality of trust in traditional doctor–patient relationships has been criticized as inordinately paternalistic, yet in today's discussions about medical ethics—mostly in response to disruptive innovation in healthcare—trust reappears as an asset to enable empowerment. To turn away from paternalistic trust‐based doctor–patient relationships and to arrive at an empowerment‐based medical model, increasing reference is made to the importance of nurturing trust in technologies that are supposed to bring that empowerment. In this article we stimulate discussion about why the move towards (...)
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  3.  44
    Getting what you desire: the normative significance of genetic relatedness in parent–child relationships.Seppe Segers, Guido Pennings & Heidi Mertes - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (3):487-495.
    People who are involuntarily childless need to use assisted reproductive technologies if they want to have a genetically related child. Yet, from an ethical point of view it is unclear to what extent assistance to satisfy this specific desire should be warranted. We first show that the subjectively felt harm due to the inability to satisfy this reproductive desire does not in itself entail the normative conclusion that it has to be met. In response, we evaluate the alternative view according (...)
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  4.  30
    The ethics of ectogenesis‐aided foetal treatment.Seppe Segers, Guido Pennings & Heidi Mertes - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (4):364-370.
    In this paper, we aim to stimulate ethical debate about the morally relevant connection between ectogenesis and the foetus as a potential beneficiary of treatment. Ectogenesis could facilitate foetal interventions by treating the foetus independently of the pregnant woman and provide easier access to the foetus if interventions are required. The moral relevance hereof derives from the observation that, together with other developments in genetic technology and prenatal treatment, this may catalyse the allocation of a patient status to the foetus. (...)
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  5.  35
    Robot Technology for the Elderly and the Value of Veracity: Disruptive Technology or Reinvigorating Entrenched Principles?Seppe Segers - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-14.
    The implementation of care robotics in care settings is identified by some authors as a disruptive innovation, in the sense that it will upend the praxis of care. It is an open ethical question whether this alleged disruption will also have a transformative impact on established ethical concepts and principles. One prevalent worry is that the implementation of care robots will turn deception into a routine component of elderly care, at least to the extent that these robots will function as (...)
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  6.  20
    Complication for a greener medical ethics code: assisted reproduction.Seppe Segers & Michiel De Proost - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):169-170.
    Paragraph 12 of the revised International Code of Medical Ethics (ICoME) states that ‘the physician should strive to practise medicine in ways that are environmentally sustainable with a view to minimising environmental health risks to current and future generations.’1 This emphasis on environmental sustainability is in line with popular discourse as well growing scholarly attention in medical ethics for healthcare’s contribution to climate change. Recent research analyses, for instance, the ‘greening’ of informed consent and related bioethical principles.2 3 It is (...)
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  7.  32
    Assessing the normative significance of desire satisfaction.Seppe Segers, Guido Pennings & Heidi Mertes - 2022 - Metaphilosophy 53 (4):475-485.
    People have various desires, but it is a contested moral issue when a desire becomes of such importance that it legitimizes a moral claim on others. This paper explores how the normative significance of desire satisfaction can be assessed and argues that a normatively significant desire can constitute a pro tanto obligation to help satisfy it. The paper presents a framework that relates the normative significance of a given desire to the general goal of living a reasonably valuable life and (...)
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  8.  27
    Disrupting medical necessity: Setting an old medical ethics theme in new light.Seppe Segers & Michiel De Proost - 2023 - Clinical Ethics 18 (3):335-342.
    Recent medical innovations like ‘omics’ technologies, mobile health (mHealth) applications or telemedicine are perceived as part of a shift towards a more preventive, participatory and affordable healthcare model. These innovations are often regarded as ‘disruptive technologies’. It is a topic of debate to what extent these technologies may transform the medical enterprise, and relatedly, what this means for medical ethics. The question of whether these developments disrupt established ethical principles like respect for autonomy has indeed received increasing normative attention during (...)
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  9.  97
    Does human genome editing reinforce or violate human dignity?Seppe Segers & Heidi Mertes - 2019 - Bioethics 34 (1):33-40.
    Germline genome editing is often disapproved of at the international policy level because of its possible threats to human dignity. However, from a critical perspective the relationship between this emerging technology and human dignity is relatively understudied. We explore the main principles that are referred to when 'human dignity' is invoked in this context; namely, the link with eugenics, the idea of a common genetic heritage, the principle of equal birth and broader equality and justice concerns. Yet the concept is (...)
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  10.  22
    What you believe you want, may not be what the algorithm knows.Seppe Segers - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (3):177-178.
    Tensions between respect for autonomy and paternalism loom large in Ferrario et al ’s discussion of artificial intelligence (AI)-based preference predictors.1 To be sure, their analysis (rightfully) brings out the moral matter of respecting patient preferences. My point here, however, is that their consideration of AI-based preference predictors in treatment of incapacitated patients opens more fundamental moral questions about the desirability of over-ruling considered patient preferences, not only if these are disclosed by surrogates, but possibly also in treating competent patients. (...)
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  11.  19
    An ethical exploration of pregnancy related mHealth: does it deliver?Seppe Segers, Heidi Mertes & Guido Pennings - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (4):677-685.
    Many pregnant women use pregnancy related mHealth applications, encompassing a variety of pregnancy apps and wearables. These are mostly directed at supporting a healthier fetal development. In this article we argue that the increasing dominance of PRmHealth stands in want of empirical knowledge affirming its beneficence in terms of improved pregnancy outcomes. This is a crucial ethical issue, especially in the light of concerns about increasing pressures and growing responsibilities ascribed to pregnant women, which may, in turn, be reinforced by (...)
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  12.  24
    Discussing social hierarchies and the importance of genetic ties: a commentary on Petersen.Seppe Segers - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (3):169-170.
    I am happy to comment on T S Petersen’s1 examination of the ‘individualization argument against non-medical egg freezing ’. Petersen intervenes in the ethical discussion on egg freezing by critically reconsidering a specific type of argument against oocyte cryopreservation for reasons that are not directly related with medical issues. Petersen dissects the claim that such non-medical usage is ‘an individualistic and morally problematic solution to the social problems that women face, for instance, in the labour market’.1 Proponents of this argument (...)
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  13. Putting “Epistemic Injustice” to Work in Bioethics: Beyond Nonmaleficence.Sigrid Wallaert & Seppe Segers - 2023 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2023:1-4.
    We expand on Della Croce’s ambition to interpret “epistemic injustice” as a specification of non-maleficence in the use of the influential four-principle framework. This is an alluring line of thought for conceptual, moral, and heuristic reasons. Although it is commendable, Della Croce’s attempt remains tentative. So does our critique of it. Yet, we take on the challenge to critically address two interrelated points. First, we broaden the analysis to include deliberations about hermeneutical injustice. We argue that, if due consideration of (...)
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  14.  26
    Anticipatory gaps challenge the public governance of heritable human genome editing.Jon Rueda, Seppe Segers, Jeroen Hopster, Karolina Kudlek, Belén Liedo, Samuela Marchiori & John Danaher - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Considering public moral attitudes is a hallmark of the anticipatory governance of emerging biotechnologies, such as heritable human genome editing. However, such anticipatory governance often overlooks that future morality is open to change and that future generations may perform different moral assessments on the very biotechnologies we are trying to govern in the present. In this article, we identify an ’anticipatory gap’ that has not been sufficiently addressed in the discussion on the public governance of heritable genome editing, namely, uncertainty (...)
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  15.  43
    Using stem cell-derived gametes for same-sex reproduction: an alternative scenario.Seppe Segers, Heidi Mertes, Guido Pennings, Guido de Wert & Wybo Dondorp - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (10):688-691.
    It has been suggested that future application of stem-cell derived gametes might lead to the possibility for same-sex couples to have genetically related children. Still, for this to become possible, the technique of gamete derivation and techniques of reprogramming somatic cells to a pluripotent state would have to be perfected. Moreover, egg cells would have to be derived from male cells and sperm cells from female cells, which is believed to be particularly difficult, if not impossible. We suggest a more (...)
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  16.  55
    In Vitro Gametogenesis and the Creation of ‘Designer Babies’.Seppe Segers, Guido Pennings, Wybo Dondorp, Guido de Wert & Heidi Mertes - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (3):499-508.
    Abstract:Research into the development of stem cell-derived (SCD) gametes in humans, otherwise known asin vitrogametogenesis (IVG), is largely motivated by reproductive aims. Especially, the goal of establishing genetic parenthood by means of SCD-gametes is considered an important aim. However, like other applications in the field of assisted reproduction, this technology evokes worries about the possibility of creating so-called ‘designer babies.’ In this paper, we investigate various ways in which SCD-gametes could be used to create such preference-matched offspring, and what this (...)
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  17.  15
    The information, control, and value models of mobile health‐driven empowerment.Jesse Gray, Seppe Segers & Heidi Mertes - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    Mobile health tools are often said to empower users by providing them with the information they need to exercise control over their health. We aim to bring clarity to this claim, and in doing so explore the relationship between empowerment and autonomy. We have identified three distinct models embedded in the empowerment rhetoric: empowerment as information, empowerment as control, and empowerment as values. Each distinct model of empowerment gives rise to an associated problem. These problems, the Problem of Interpretation, the (...)
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  18.  43
    Why we should (not) worry about generative AI in medical ethics teaching.Seppe Segers - 2024 - International Journal of Ethics Education 9 (1):57-63.
    In this article I discuss the ethical ramifications for medical ethics training of the availability of large language models (LLMs) for medical students. My focus is on the practical ethical consequences for what we should expect of medical students in terms of medical professionalism and ethical reasoning, and how this can be tested in a context where LLMs are relatively easy available. If we continue to expect ethical competences of medical professionalism of future physicians, how much – if at all (...)
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  19.  8
    Revisiting the ought implies can dictum in light of disruptive medical innovation.Michiel De Proost & Seppe Segers - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (7):466-470.
    It is a dominant dictum in ethics that ‘ought implies can’ (OIC): if an agent morally ought to do an action, the agent must be capable of performing that action. Yet, with current technological developments, such as in direct-to-consumer genomics, big data analytics and wearable technologies, there may be reasons to reorient this ethical principle. It is our modest aim in this article to explore how the current wave of allegedly disruptive innovation calls for a renewed interest for this dictum. (...)
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  20.  7
    Navigating the Landscape of Digital Twins in Medicine: A Relational Bioethical Inquiry.Brandon Ferlito, Michiel De Proost & Seppe Segers - 2024 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (3):471-481.
    This perspective article explores the use of digital twins (DTs) in medicine, highlighting its capacity to simulate risks and personalize treatments while examining the emerging bioethical concerns. Central concerns include power dynamics, exclusion, and misrepresentation. We propose adopting a relational bioethical approach that advocates for a comprehensive assessment of DTs in medicine, extending beyond individual interactions to consider broader structural relations and varying levels of access to power. This can be achieved through two key relational recommendations: acknowledging the impact of (...)
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  21.  37
    In vitro gametogenesis and reproductive cloning: Can we allow one while banning the other?Seppe Segers, Guido Pennings, Wybo Dondorp, Guido de Wert & Heidi Mertes - 2018 - Bioethics 33 (1):68-75.
    In vitro gametogenesis (IVG) is believed to be the next big breakthrough in reproductive medicine. The prima facie acceptance of this possible future technology is notable when compared to the general prohibition on human reproductive cloning. After all, if safety is the main reason for not allowing reproductive cloning, one might expect a similar conclusion for the reproductive application of IVG, since both technologies hold considerable and comparable risks. However, safety concerns may be overcome, and are presumably not the sole (...)
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  22.  6
    Age‐related hearing loss and “hearables”: An agenda for moral considerations.Michiel De Proost, Seppe Segers & Heidi Mertes - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    Rapid advances in digital hearing technologies, also known as hearables, are expected to disrupt the direct‐to‐consumer health market. For older adults with higher incidence of hearing loss, such disruption could reduce hearing problems, increase accessibility to hearing aids, and mitigate related stigmas. This paper delves into the intersection of disruptive innovation and hearables within the realm of biomedical ethics. Through a comprehensive exploration, we shed light on the ethical implications surrounding hearables. By critically evaluating the key ethical advantages and drawbacks, (...)
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  23.  6
    Take five? A coherentist argument why medical AI does not require a new ethical principle.Seppe Segers & Michiel De Proost - forthcoming - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-14.
    With the growing application of machine learning models in medicine, principlist bioethics has been put forward as needing revision. This paper reflects on the dominant trope in AI ethics to include a new ‘principle of explicability’ alongside the traditional four principles of bioethics that make up the theory of principlism. It specifically suggests that these four principles are sufficient and challenges the relevance of explicability as a separate ethical principle by emphasizing the coherentist affinity of principlism. We argue that, through (...)
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  24.  22
    ‘False hope’ in assisted reproduction: the normative significance of the external outlook and moral negotiation.Dorian Accoe & Seppe Segers - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):181-184.
    Despite the frequent invocation of ‘false hope’ and possible related moral concerns in the context of assisted reproduction technologies, a focused ethical and conceptual problematisation of this concept seems to be lacking. We argue that an invocation of ‘false hope’ only makes sense if the fulfilment of a desired outcome (eg, a successful fertility treatment) is impossible, and if it is attributed from an external perspective. The evaluation incurred by this third party may foreclose a given perspective from being an (...)
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  25.  4
    Reproductive Technologies and family ties.Ji-Young Lee & Seppe Segers - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  26.  9
    De meta-ethische wending in de bio-ethiek.Seppe Segers & Michiel De Proost - 2023 - Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 115 (3):321-324.
    Amsterdam University Press is a leading publisher of academic books, journals and textbooks in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Our aim is to make current research available to scholars, students, innovators, and the general public. AUP stands for scholarly excellence, global presence, and engagement with the international academic community.
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