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  1.  36
    Pluralistic Internalism.Scott Kretchmar - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (1):83-100.
    The purpose of this paper is to identify and defend a broad biologically informed internalist position. This internalism is pluralistic because it more explicitly identifies the range of ‘best light’ sporting practices than previous internalist literature. As such, it may help to solve a long-standing debate between broad internalists or interpretivists, as they are also called, and conventionalists. I present six models of sport that reflect different normative stances on testing and contesting acts. Each one is grounded in what I (...)
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  2.  44
    Competition, Redemption, and Hope.Scott Kretchmar - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):101-116.
    Zero-sum aspects of sport have generated a number of ethical concerns and a similar number of defenses or apologetics. The trick has been to find a middle position that neither overly gentrifies sport nor inappropriately emphasizes the significance of winning and losing. One such position would have us focus on the process of trying to win over the fact of having one. It would also ameliorate any harms associated with defeat by pointing out that benefits like achievement, excellence, and moral (...)
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  3.  23
    A phenomenology of competition.Scott Kretchmar - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (1):21-37.
    In this essay, I attempt to use Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology for purposes of describing central features of competition. While not accepting all theoretical aspects of this methodology, I employ its central strategies to see how well it works. In carrying out the phenomenological analysis, I examine noetic and noematic correlates of competitive projects including the factors of plurality, normativity, disputation, temporality, and comparability. I finish by reviewing three forms of pseudo or defective competition. I conclude that eidetic analyses like the (...)
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  4.  24
    Gaming Up Life: Considerations for Game Expansions.Scott Kretchmar - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):142-155.
  5.  11
    A phenomenology of competition.Scott Kretchmar - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (1):21-37.
    In this essay, I attempt to use Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology for purposes of describing central features of competition. While not accepting all theoretical aspects of this methodology, I employ its central strategies to see how well it works. In carrying out the phenomenological analysis, I examine noetic and noematic correlates of competitive projects including the factors of plurality, normativity, disputation, temporality, and comparability. I finish by reviewing three forms of pseudo or defective competition. I conclude that eidetic analyses like the (...)
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  6.  28
    The Nature of Competition: In Defense of Descriptive Accuracy.Scott Kretchmar - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (2):237-246.
    In this brief essay, I defend my original analysis of competition and respond to a number of recent criticisms. In this process, I extend my analysis by showing the cogency and value of the kinds of metaphysical analyses recommended by Husserl. Specifically, I discuss utility of descriptive precision related to clear thinking, improved communication, and a more robust normative appreciation of competitive acts. Of particular importance in this discussion is the distinction between literal and metaphorical uses of language.
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  7.  39
    Dualisms, dichotomies and dead ends: Limitations of analytic thinking about sport.Scott Kretchmar - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):266 – 280.
    In this essay I attempt to show the limitations of analytic thinking and the kinds of dead ends into which such analyses may lead us in the philosophy of sport. As an alternative, I argue for a philosophy of complementation and compatibility in the face of what appear to be exclusive alternatives. This is a position that is sceptical of bifurcations and other simplified portrayals of reality but does not dismiss them entirely. A philosophy of complementation traffics in the realm (...)
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  8.  39
    A Revised Definition of Games: An Analysis of Grasshopper Errors, Omissions, and Ambiguities.Scott Kretchmar - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (3-4):277-292.
    ABSTRACTIn this essay, I review Suits’ classic description of games and cite three kinds of problems—mischaracterizations, omissions, and ambiguities. I build on previous criticisms by myself and others leveled at his definition. However, in contrast to much of this previous work, I will present what I hope is an improved description. The latter part of the essay is devoted to defending this alternate characterization. I conclude by arguing that my revisionist work paradoxically both supports and undermines the merits of Suits’ (...)
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  9.  32
    Calling the beautiful game ugly: A response to Davis.Scott Kretchmar - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (3):321 – 336.
    In a previous article (Kretchmar 2005), I identified problems in a certain species of games and traced these harms to something I called a 'game flaw'. Unfortunately, 'the beautiful game' is a member of that species. I say it is unfortunate because Paul Davis (2006), when taking me to task for providing an argument that, in his terms, was 'not especially compelling', focused on the game of soccer (hereafter, football). The issue over which we contended is one of 'time management'- (...)
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  10.  8
    Games and Fiction: Partners in the Evolution of Culture.Scott Kretchmar - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):12-25.
    In this essay, I argue that the time is right in the philosophy of sport to follow the lead of systems thinking and emphasize the contextual embeddedness of sport, not its distinctive characteristics, least of all any claims for metaphysical independence. Accordingly, I analyze similarities between two cultural conventions—namely, literature and games—through the lens of evolution. I argue that common roots can be observed in games and fiction when looking at them structurally, semantically, and socially. I suggest that both games (...)
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  11.  7
    A Response to Gaffney: Teammates and the Games they Play.Scott Kretchmar - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (1):35-41.
    In this essay I endorse Gaffney’s paradoxical analysis that supports the right over the good, ‘horizontal commitments’ to teammates over ‘vertical loyalties’ to the cause of winning. However, I attempt to present two friendly amendments—by adding a second factor to the vertical element and by showing that a virtue ethics approach is needed in certain situations. I conclude that Gaffney’s deontological stance serves him well in the Hope Solo case, but might not be as effective in other circumstances.
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  12.  24
    A Special Issue on Sport and Spirituality.Scott Kretchmar & John White - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):1-3.
  13.  13
    Modes of philosophic inquiry and sport.Scott Kretchmar - 1974 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 1 (1):129-131.
  14.  45
    Chesterton on Play, Work, Paradox, and Christian Orthodoxy.Scott Kretchmar & Nick J. Watson - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):70-80.
    In this essay we attempt to accomplish two things related to the work of G.K. Chesterton. The first is to use one of his favorite ploys to articulate the nature of play. We discuss several paradoxical characteristics of play and attempt to show how seemingly contradictory features actually help us to understand play’s allure and other values. We introduce the second topic of theological analyses of work and play with a review of the Christian literature on these subjects. We then (...)
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  15.  13
    Golf as meaningful play: a philosophical guide.Scott Kretchmar - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (2):204-208.
  16.  15
    Homo Forte: A Philosophical Tribute to Muscle.Scott Kretchmar - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (4):375-385.
  17.  7
    Sport: By Colin McGinn. Published 2008 by Acumen Press, Stocksfield, UK.Scott Kretchmar - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):258-262.
  18. Soft metaphysics: A precursor to good sports ethics.Scott Kretchmar - 1998 - In M. J. McNamee & S. J. Parry (eds.), Ethics and Sport. E & Fn Spon. pp. 19--34.
     
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  19. 8 Why Dichotomies Make It Difficult to See Games as Gifts of God.Scott Kretchmar - 2010 - In S. J. Parry, Mark Nesti & Nick Watson (eds.), Theology, Ethics, and Transcendence in Sports. Routledge. pp. 185.
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  20. Walter J. Ong, Fighting for Life: Contest, Sexuality and Consciousness Reviewed by.Scott Kretchmar - 1983 - Philosophy in Review 3 (5):244-246.
     
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  21.  6
    Sport: By Colin McGinn. Published 2008 by Acumen Press, Stocksfield, UK. [REVIEW]Scott Kretchmar - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):258-262.
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