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Scott Austin [16]Scott Whiting Austin [1]
  1.  9
    The Paradox of Socratic Ignorance (How to Know That You Don’t Know).Scott Austin - 1987 - Philosophical Topics 15 (2):23-34.
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  2.  9
    Parmenides and the history of dialectic: three essays.Scott Austin - 2007 - Las Vegas [Nev.]: Parmenides.
    Essay one: Parmenidean dialectic -- Essay two: Parmenidean metaphysics -- Essay three: Parmenides and the history of dialectic.
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  3.  56
    The Paradox of Socratic Ignorance (How to Know That You Don’t Know).Scott Austin - 1987 - Philosophical Topics 15 (2):23-34.
  4.  77
    Modality and Predication in Parmenides’s Fragment 8 and in Subsequent Dialectic.Scott Austin - 2013 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):87-95.
    In this paper I shall attempt to enter part of the way into the microstructure of the account of truth in the Parmenidean fragment 8, and to reveal that account as a dialectical sequence of affirmation and denial involving various kinds of modal utterance. The sequence will then be put into parallel with the first four hypotheses of the second half of Plato’s Parmenides as well as with Zeno and some of the later tradition.
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  5. From Parmenidean to Hegelian Monism.Scott Austin - 2003 - In Andreas Bächli & Klaus Petrus (eds.), Monism. Ontos. pp. 9--57.
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  6.  41
    Parmenides and the Closure of the West.Scott Austin - 2000 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 74 (2):287-301.
  7. Parmenides and Ultimate Reality.Scott Austin - 1984 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 7 (3):220-232.
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  8.  31
    Parmenides' Reference.Scott Austin - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (01):266-.
    First in the aether Parmenides places the morning star, which he believes to be the same as the evening star… [the moon] always looking towards the sunshine I shall not be concerned with the truth or falsity of these ascriptions, only with the fact that they are just the sort of thing that Parmenides could have said. Nor is an interest in Parmenidean reference new in the literature: Furth calls him a ‘hyperdenotationist’, and the word is apt on almost any (...)
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  9.  6
    Parmenides' Reference.Scott Austin - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (1):266-267.
    First in the aether Parmenides places the morning star, which he believes to be the same as the evening star… [the moon] always looking towards the sunshine I shall not be concerned with the truth or falsity of these ascriptions, only with the fact that they are just the sort of thing that Parmenides could have said. Nor is an interest in Parmenidean reference new in the literature: Furth calls him a ‘hyperdenotationist’, and the word is apt on almost any (...)
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  10.  47
    Scepticism and Dogmatism in the Presocratics.Scott Austin - 2000 - Apeiron 33 (3):239 - 246.
  11.  27
    Some Eleatic Features of Platonic and Neoplatonic Method.Scott Austin - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):65-74.
  12.  8
    Tao and trinity: notes on self-reference and the unity of opposites in philosophy.Scott Austin - 2014 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Tao and Trinity treats the Trinity as a philosophical notion coming to birth in Heraclitus, Parmenides, and Plato. All three attempt to treat the idea of an absolute source or unity of all things, and are driven in the direction of a first principle which is an instance of itself, an identity and a contradiction at once. The Trinity later on in Aquinas is also such a principle, one characteristically Western, with consequences for art and metaphor, image and symbol, comedy, (...)
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  13.  44
    To Think Like God: Pythagoras and Parmenides: The Origins of Philosophy (review).Scott Austin - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (4):481-482.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:To Think Like God: Pythagoras and Parmenides: The Origins of PhilosophyScott AustinArnold Hermann. To Think Like God: Pythagoras and Parmenides: The Origins of Philosophy. Las Vegas: Parmenides Publishing, 2004. Pp. xxx + 374. Cloth, $32.00.Mr. Arnold Hermann could presumably have used his connection with Parmenides Press to publish anything he wanted. Instead, he has put out a sober, bibliographically well aware, thesis about the origin, nature, and motivations (...)
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  14.  31
    Plato’s Reception of Parmenides. [REVIEW]Scott Austin - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):247-249.
    On the hermeneutic. Palmer declares it unnecessary to recover Parmenides’ original authorial intentions in performing his poem ). It is “simply a mistake—one might term it the ‘essentialist fallacy’—to privilege Parmenides’ intended meaning as the determining factor in his subsequent influence”. Here the claim is not the one that authorial intention is irrecoverable, but the quite different claim that it is an “error vitiating most appraisals of this influence [of Parmenides on Plato to make] the assumption that one can base (...)
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  15.  34
    (P.) Thanassas Parmenides, Cosmos, and Being. A Philosophical Interpretation. (Marquette Studies in Philosophy 57.) Pp. 109. Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2007. Paper, US$15. ISBN: 978-0-87462-755-. [REVIEW]Scott Austin - 2009 - The Classical Review 59 (1):294-.
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  16.  15
    Review of Daniel W. Graham, Explaining the Cosmos: The Ionian traditIon of Scientific Philosophy[REVIEW]Scott Austin - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (2).