Results for 'Sarah Levitt'

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  1.  30
    Applying futility in psychiatry: a concept whose time has come.Sarah Levitt & Daniel Z. Buchman - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):e60-e60.
    Since its introduction in the 1980s, futility as a concept has held contested meaning and applications throughout medicine. There has been little discussion within the psychiatric literature about the use of futility in the care of individuals experiencing severe and persistent mental illness, despite some tacit acceptance that futility may apply in certain cases of psychiatric illness. In this paper, we explore the literature surrounding futility and argue that its connotation within medicine is to describe situations where patients believe that (...)
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  2.  12
    Humanizing Patients and Their Needs Might Affect Psychiatrists’ Thinking about Futility.Rachel B. Cooper, Sarah E. Levitt & Daniel Z. Buchman - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 15 (1):64-67.
    Dorfman et al. (2024) make a significant empirical contribution to a growing body of literature pertaining to issues of futility in psychiatry. The authors acknowledge that their survey methodologi...
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  3.  11
    Palliative Psychiatry for Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa Includes but Goes beyond Harm Reduction.Anna L. Westermair, Daniel Z. Buchman, Sarah Levitt & Manuel Trachsel - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (7):60-62.
    Bianchi et al. argue that for some patients with severe and enduring anorexia nervosa approaches that do not aim for complete clinical recovery are ethically warranted. We believe tha...
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  4. Truth and objectivity in conceptual engineering.Sarah Sawyer - 2020 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 63 (9-10):1001-1022.
    Conceptual engineering is to be explained by appeal to the externalist distinction between concepts and conceptions. If concepts are determined by non-conceptual relations to objective properties rather than by associated conceptions (whether individual or communal), then topic preservation through semantic change will be possible. The requisite level of objectivity is guaranteed by the possibility of collective error and does not depend on a stronger level of objectivity, such as mind-independence or independence from linguistic or social practice more generally. This means (...)
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  5.  98
    Plan B.Sarah K. Paul - 2022 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 100 (3):550-564.
    We sometimes strive to achieve difficult goals when our evidence suggests that success is unlikely – not just because it will require strength of will, but because we are targets of prejudice and discrimination or because success will require unusual ability. Optimism about one’s prospects can be useful for persevering in these cases. That said, excessive optimism can be dangerous; when our evidence is unfavourable, we should be at most agnostic about whether we will succeed. This paper explores the nature (...)
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  6. Contrast dependence of contextual effects in macaque striate cortex.J. B. Levitt & J. S. Lund - 1996 - In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. pp. 22-22.
  7.  49
    Drinking to Get Drunk: Pleasure, Creativity, and Social Harmony in Greece and China.Sarah Mattice - 2011 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (2):243-253.
    This essay examines the multifaceted roles of drinking parties in early Greece and in medieval China. It takes as paradigm examples descriptions of ritual intoxication in Plato’s Laws and in the poetry of Ouyang Xiu and Mei Yaochen, arguing that these divergent cultural and philosophical traditions can be both related and made distinct through concepts of pleasure, creativity, and social harmony.
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  8.  29
    Let the consumer decide? The regulation of commercial genetic testing.D. M. Levitt - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):398-403.
    Objectives—The development of predictive genetic tests provides a new area where consumers can gain knowledge of their health status and commercial opportunities. “Over-the-counter” or mail order genetic tests are most likely to provide information on carrier status or the risk of developing a multifactorial disease. The paper considers the social and ethical implications of individuals purchasing genetic tests and whether genetic information is different from other types of health information which individuals can obtain for themselves.Design—The discussion is illustrated by findings (...)
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  9. Grit.Sarah K. Paul & Jennifer M. Morton - 2018 - Ethics 129 (2):175-203.
    Many of our most important goals require months or even years of effort to achieve, and some never get achieved at all. As social psychologists have lately emphasized, success in pursuing such goals requires the capacity for perseverance, or "grit." Philosophers have had little to say about grit, however, insofar as it differs from more familiar notions of willpower or continence. This leaves us ill-equipped to assess the social and moral implications of promoting grit. We propose that grit has an (...)
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  10. Generics: Cognition and acquisition.Sarah-Jane Leslie - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (1):1-47.
    Ducks lay eggs' is a true sentence, and `ducks are female' is a false one. Similarly, `mosquitoes carry the West Nile virus' is obviously true, whereas `mosquitoes don't carry the West Nile virus' is patently false. This is so despite the egg-laying ducks' being a subset of the female ones and despite the number of mosquitoes that don't carry the virus being ninety-nine times the number that do. Puzzling facts such as these have made generic sentences defy adequate semantic treatment. (...)
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  11.  29
    The Flight from science and reason.Paul R. Gross, Norman Levitt & Martin W. Lewis (eds.) - 1996 - New York N.Y.: The New York Academy of Sciences.
    "Evidence of a flight from reason is as old as human record-keeping: the fact of it certainly goes back an even longer way. Flight from science specifically, among the forms of rational inquiry, goes back as far as science itself... But rejection of reason is now a pattern to be found in most branches of scholarship and in all the learned professions."--from the introduction In the widely acclaimed Higher Superstition: The Academic Left and Its Quarrels with Science, Paul R. Gross (...)
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  12. Causation By Omission: A Dilemma.Sarah McGrath - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 123 (1-2):125-148.
    Some omissions seem to be causes. For example, suppose Barry promises to water Alice’s plant, doesn’t water it, and that the plant then dries up and dies. Barry’s not watering the plant – his omitting to water the plant – caused its death. But there is reason to believe that if omissions are ever causes, then there is far more causation by omission than we ordinarily think. In other words, there is reason to think the following thesis true.
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  13.  19
    Ethics of Clinical Science in a Public Health Emergency: Drug Discovery at the Bedside.Sarah Jl Edwards - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (9):3-14.
    Clinical research under the usual regulatory constraints may be difficult or even impossible in a public health emergency. Regulators must seek to strike a good balance in granting as wide therapeutic access to new drugs as possible at the same time as gathering sound evidence of safety and effectiveness. To inform current policy, I reexamine the philosophical rationale for restricting new medicines to clinical trials, at any stage and for any population of patients (which resides in the precautionary principle), to (...)
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  14.  83
    Genome Editing Technologies and Human Germline Genetic Modification: The Hinxton Group Consensus Statement.Sarah Chan, Peter J. Donovan, Thomas Douglas, Christopher Gyngell, John Harris, Robin Lovell-Badge, Debra J. H. Mathews, Alan Regenberg & On Behalf of the Hinxton Group - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):42-47.
    The prospect of using genome technologies to modify the human germline has raised profound moral disagreement but also emphasizes the need for wide-ranging discussion and a well-informed policy response. The Hinxton Group brought together scientists, ethicists, policymakers, and journal editors for an international, interdisciplinary meeting on this subject. This consensus statement formulated by the group calls for support of genome editing research and the development of a scientific roadmap for safety and efficacy; recognizes the ethical challenges involved in clinical reproductive (...)
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  15. Generics and the structure of the mind.Sarah-Jane Leslie - 2007 - Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):375–403.
  16. Normative Practices of Other Animals.Sarah Vincent, Rebecca Ring & Kristin Andrews - 2018 - In Aaron Zimmerman, Karen Jones & Mark Timmons (eds.), Routledge Handbook on Moral Epistemology. New York: Routledge. pp. 57-83.
    Traditionally, discussions of moral participation – and in particular moral agency – have focused on fully formed human actors. There has been some interest in the development of morality in humans, as well as interest in cultural differences when it comes to moral practices, commitments, and actions. However, until relatively recently, there has been little focus on the possibility that nonhuman animals have any role to play in morality, save being the objects of moral concern. Moreover, when nonhuman cases are (...)
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  17. Moral perception and its rivals.Sarah McGrath - 2018 - In Anna Bergqvist & Robert Cowan (eds.), Evaluative Perception. Oxford University Press.
     
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  18.  39
    Feminism and Analytic Philosophy of Religion.Sarah Coakley - 2005 - In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford handbook of philosophy of religion. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 494--525.
    This chapter offers a sustained analysis of the two major feminist critiques of analytic philosophy of religion: Grace Jantzen’s Becoming Divine and Pamela Sue Anderson’s A Feminist Philosophy of Religion. Jantzen’s project draws on Lacan’s and Irigaray’s account of psycholinguistics to insist that analytic philosophy of religion is thoroughgoingly “phallocentric” and “necrophiliac;” a new “feminine imaginary” is needed to replace its “masculinist” obsession with empirical demonstration and epistemic realism. Anderson’s book mounts a similar critique of the analytic school but is (...)
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  19.  11
    Philosophical Medical Ethics.Sarah Haddon Furness - 1987 - Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (4):218-218.
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  20. Zizek: a critical introduction.Sarah Kay - 2003 - Malden, MA: Distributed in the USA by Blackwell.
    Introduction: Thinking, writing, and reading about the real -- Dialectic and the real : Lacan, Hegel, and the alchemy of après-coup -- 'Reality' and the real : culture as anamorphosis -- The real of sexual difference : imagining, thinking, being -- Ethics and the real : the ungodly virtues of psychoanalysis -- Politics, or, the art of the impossible.
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  21.  20
    Brain imaging and the transparency scenario.Sarah Richmond - 2012 - In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I know what you're thinking: brain imaging and mental privacy. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 185.
  22. Against Autonomy: Justifying Coercive Paternalism.Sarah Conly - 2012 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Since Mill's seminal work On Liberty, philosophers and political theorists have accepted that we should respect the decisions of individual agents when those decisions affect no one other than themselves. Indeed, to respect autonomy is often understood to be the chief way to bear witness to the intrinsic value of persons. In this book, Sarah Conly rejects the idea of autonomy as inviolable. Drawing on sources from behavioural economics and social psychology, she argues that we are so often irrational (...)
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  23. Automated Influence and the Challenge of Cognitive Security.Sarah Rajtmajer & Daniel Susser - forthcoming - HoTSoS: ACM Symposium on Hot Topics in the Science of Security.
    Advances in AI are powering increasingly precise and widespread computational propaganda, posing serious threats to national security. The military and intelligence communities are starting to discuss ways to engage in this space, but the path forward is still unclear. These developments raise pressing ethical questions, about which existing ethics frameworks are silent. Understanding these challenges through the lens of “cognitive security,” we argue, offers a promising approach.
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  24.  17
    Protecting privacy interests in brain images : the limits of consent.Sarah J. L. Edwards - 2012 - In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I know what you're thinking: brain imaging and mental privacy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  25. Embarking on a Crime.Sarah Paul - 2014 - In Enrique Villanueva V. (ed.), Law and the Philosophy of Action. Rodopi. pp. 101-24.
    When we define something as a crime, we generally thereby criminalize the attempt to commit that crime. However, it is a vexing puzzle to specify what must be the case in order for a criminal attempt to have occurred, given that the results element of the crime fails to come about. I argue that the philosophy of action can assist the criminal law in clarifying what kinds of events are properly categorized as criminal attempts. A natural thought is that this (...)
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  26.  13
    Complementarity rather than integration.Mairi Levitt - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (1):81-83.
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  27. Introduction to the topical collection ‘locating representations in the brain: interdisciplinary perspectives’.Sarah K. Robins & Felipe De Brigard - 2024 - Synthese 203 (5):1-18.
  28.  38
    Cyberfeminism and artificial life.Sarah Kember - 2003 - New York: Routledge.
    Cyberfeminism and Artificial Life examines construction, manipulation and re-definition of life in contemporary technoscientific culture. It takes a critical political view of the concept of life as information, tracing this through the new biology and the changing discipline of artificial life and its manifestation in art, language, literature, commerce and entertainment. From cloning to computer games, and incorporating an analysis of hardware, software and 'wetware', Sarah Kember demonstrates how this relatively marginal field connects with, and connects up global networks (...)
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  29.  43
    A Radical Approach to Ebola: Saving Humans and Other Animals.Sarah J. L. Edwards, Charles H. Norell, Phyllis Illari, Brendan Clarke & Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (10):35-42.
    As the usual regulatory framework did not fit well during the last Ebola outbreak, innovative thinking still needed. In the absence of an outbreak, randomised controlled trials of clinical efficacy in humans cannot be done, while during an outbreak such trials will continue to face significant practical, philosophical, and ethical challenges. This article argues that researchers should also test the safety and effectiveness of novel vaccines in wild apes by employing a pluralistic approach to evidence. There are three reasons to (...)
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  30. Off-centre: feminism and cultural studies.Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (eds.) - 1991 - New York, NY, USA: HarperCollins Academic.
    This indispensible collection brings together feminist theory and cultural studies, looking at issues such as pop culture and the media, science and technology, ...
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  31.  17
    Karl Polanyi: A Biographical Sketch.K. Polanyi-Levitt & M. Mendell - 1987 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1987 (73):121-131.
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  32.  6
    Karl Polanyi: A Biographical Sketch.K. Polanyi-Levitt, M. Mendell, A. Martinelli, J. -J. Gislain & A. Salsano - 1987 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1987 (73):121-131.
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  33.  82
    Weakness of Will and Practical Judgement.Sarah Stroud - 2003 - In Sarah Stroud & Christine Tappolet (eds.), Weakness of will and practical irrationality. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 121.
    A practical judgement is one which enjoys an internal, necessary relation to subsequent action or intention, and which can serve as a sufficient explanation of such action or intention. Does the phenomenon of weakness of will show that deliberation does not characteristically issue in such practical judgements? The author argues that the possibility of akrasia does not threaten the view that we make practical judgements, when the latter thesis is properly understood. Indeed, the author suggests that the alleged possibility of (...)
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  34.  11
    Focusing attention on physicians’ climate-related duties may risk missing the bigger picture: towards a systems approach to health and climate.Gabby Samuel, Sarah Briggs, Faranak Hardcastle, Kate Lyle, Emily Parker & Anneke M. Lucassen - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Gils-Schmidt and Salloch recognise that human and climate health are inextricably linked, and that mitigating healthcare-associated climate harms is essential for protecting human health.1 They argue that physicians have a duty to consider how their own practices contribute to climate change, including during their interactions with patients. Acknowledging the potential for conflicts between this duty and the provision of individual patient care, they propose the application of Korsgaard’s neo-Kantian account of practical identities to help navigate such scenarios. In this commentary, (...)
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  35. Fetal fascinations: new dimensions to the medical-scientific construction of fetal personhood.Sarah Franklin - 1991 - In Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (eds.), Off-centre: feminism and cultural studies. New York, NY, USA: HarperCollins Academic. pp. 190--205.
     
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  36.  21
    Symbolic Cognition in Poetic Experience: Re-representing the Paraphrase Paradox.Sarah Feldman - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (3):283-298.
    This article considers an apparent tension between, on the one hand, a widespread belief among literature teachers that the appreciation of a poem involves an experience of form-content inseparability and, on the other hand, these same teachers’ use of paraphrase to encourage appreciation. Using Terrence Deacon’s model of art experience, I argue that the tensions of this ‘paraphrase paradox’ mirror tensions inherent in poetic experience. Section II draws upon work by Rafe McGregor, Peter Lamarque, and Peter Kivy to frame an (...)
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  37. Bibliographie der deutsch- und englischsprachigen Wittgenstein-Ausgaben.Sarah Anna Szeltner, Michael Biggs & Alois Pichler - 2011 - Wittgenstein-Studien 2 (1):249-286.
  38.  5
    Menstrual Temporality: Cyclic Bodies in a Linear World.Sarah Pawlett Jackson - forthcoming - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology:1-18.
    In this paper I will explore a phenomenology of the menstrual cycle, focusing on the cycle’s rhythm as a form of lived temporality. Drawing on the work of Henri Lefebvre and Thomas Fuchs I will outline a key connection between embodiment and rhythmic temporality more generally, before applying this analysis to the rhythm of the menstrual cycle specifically. I will consider the phenomenology of the experience of cycling through the phases of pre-ovulation, ovulation, pre-menstruation and menstruation as a pattern, or (...)
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  39. Rational Powers and Inaction.Sarah K. Paul - 2023 - Philosophical Inquiries 11 (1).
    This discussion of Sergio Tenenbaum’s excellent book, Rational Powers in Action, focuses on two noteworthy aspects of the big picture. First, questions are raised about Tenenbaum’s methodology of giving primacy to cases in which the agent has all the requisite background knowledge, including knowledge of a means that will be sufficient for achieving her end, and no significant false beliefs. Second, the implications of Tenenbaum’s views concerning the rational constraints on revising our ends are examined.
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  40.  37
    One Child: Do We Have a Right to More?Sarah Conly - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    A compelling argument for the morality of limitations on procreation in lessening the harmful environmental effects of unchecked populationWe live in a world where a burgeoning global population has started to have a major and destructive environmental impact. The results, including climate change and the struggle for limited resources, appear to be inevitable aspects of a difficult future. Mandatory population control might be a possible last resort to combat this problem, but is also a potentially immoral and undesirable violation of (...)
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  41. Is procrastination weakness of will?Sarah Stroud - 2010 - In Chrisoula Andreou & Mark D. White (eds.), The Thief of Time: Philosophical Essays on Procrastination. Oxford University Press. pp. 51-67.
     
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  42. Concepts, conceptions and self-knowledge.Sarah Sawyer - 2019 - Erkenntnis (y).
    Content externalism implies first, that there is a distinction between concepts and conceptions, and second, that there is a distinction between thoughts and states of mind. In this paper, I argue for a novel theory of self-knowledge: the partial-representation theory of self-knowledge, according to which the self-ascription of a thought is authoritative when it is based on a con-scious, occurrent thought in virtue of which it partially represents an underlying state of mind.
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  43. The Importance of Fictional Properties.Sarah Sawyer - 2015 - In Stuart Brock & Anthony Everett (eds.), Fictional Objects. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 208-229.
    Semantic theories of fictional names generally presuppose, either explicitly or implicitly, that fictional predicates are guaranteed a referent. I argue that this presupposition is inconsistent with anti-realist theories of fictional characters and that it cannot be taken for granted by realist theories of fictional characters. The question of whether a fictional name refers to a fictional character cannot be addressed independently of the much-neglected question of whether a fictional predicate refers to a fictional property.
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  44.  4
    Puissances, impuissance et limites corporelles.Sarah Carvallo - 2023 - Philosophique 26 (26):29-51.
    Fort, da. Loin, ici. L’enfant joue avec la bobine de fil qui s’éloigne et disparaît, puis revient. Enracinement, déracinement, certaines expériences ancrent mon corps dans une présence à soi, au monde et aux autres, tandis que d’autres me rendent étrangère à moi-même, aux autres et au monde. Les modalités du jeu ou de l’existence se cristallisent dans le corps, qui oscille entre ces deux pôles : il s’affirme et se nie, il s’impose et se retire, il procure plaisir et peine, (...)
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  45. Conclusion.Sarah J. L. Edwards & Geraint Rees - 2012 - In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I know what you're thinking: brain imaging and mental privacy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
     
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  46. The Original Sin of Cognition: Fear Prejudice, and Generalization.Sarah-Jane Leslie - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy 114 (8):393-421.
    Generic generalizations such as ‘mosquitoes carry the West Nile virus’ or ‘sharks attack bathers’ are often accepted by speakers despite the fact that very few members of the kinds in question have the predicated property. Previous work suggests that such low-prevalence generalizations may be accepted when the properties in question are dangerous, harmful, or appalling. This paper argues that the study of such generic generalizations sheds light on a particular class of prejudiced social beliefs, and points to new ways in (...)
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  47. Contrastive self-knowledge and the McKinsey paradox.Sarah Sawyer - 2015 - In Sanford C. Goldberg (ed.), Externalism, Self-Knowledge, and Skepticism: New Essays. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. pp. 75-93.
    In this paper I argue first, that a contrastive account of self-knowledge and the propositional attitudes entails an anti-individualist account of propositional attitude concepts, second, that the final account provides a solution to the McKinsey paradox, and third, that the account has the resources to explain why certain anti-skeptical arguments fail.
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  48.  13
    When Is Work Unjust? Confronting the Choice between ‘Pluralistic’ and ‘Unifying’ Approaches.Sarah C. Goff - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):218-234.
    Individuals have different experiences of work when they are self-employed, when they perform tasks in the gig economy, and when they follow directives from managers. But such differences are not represented in some of the most prominent non-ideal theories of work. These describe workers as a coherent group, with a position in the structure of the liberal capitalist economy. I present an alternative that does better at acknowledging difference, through a description of work and workers that has greater ‘pluralism’ and (...)
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  49.  13
    The Ethics of Need: Agency, Dignity, and Obligation.Sarah Clark Miller - 2012 - New York: Routledge.
    The Ethics of Need: Agency, Dignity, and Obligation argues for the philosophical importance of the notion of need and for an ethical framework through which we can determine which needs have moral significance. In the volume, Sarah Clark Miller synthesizes insights from Kantian and feminist care ethics to establish that our mutual and inevitable interdependence gives rise to a duty to care for the needs of others. Further, she argues that we are obligated not merely to meet others’ needs (...)
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  50. Moral Knowledge and Experience.Sarah McGrath - 2011 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics, Volume 6: Volume 6. Oxford University Press.
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