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Sarah Byers [12]Sarah Catherine Byers [7]Sarah C. Byers [1]
  1.  18
    Perception, Sensibility, and Moral Motivation in Augustine: A Stoic-Platonic Synthesis.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2013 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    This book argues that Augustine assimilated the Stoic theory of perception and mental language (lekta/dicibilia), and that this epistemology underlies his accounts of motivation, affectivity, therapy for the passions, and moral progress. Byers elucidates seminal passages which have long puzzled commentators, such as Confessions 8, City of God 9 and 14, Replies to Simplicianus 1, and obscure sections of the later ‘anti-Pelagian’ works. Tracking the Stoic terminology, Byers analyzes Augustine’s engagement with Cicero, Seneca, Ambrose, Jerome, Origen, and Philo of Alexandria, (...)
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  2. "Augustine and the Philosophers".Sarah Byers - 2012 - In Mark Vessey (ed.), A Companion to Augustine. Wiley. pp. 175-187.
  3.  50
    The Meaning of Voluntas in Augustine.Sarah Byers - 2006 - Augustinian Studies 37 (2):171-189.
  4. Augustine's Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2016 - In John Sellars (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition. Routledge. pp. 56-69.
    Seneca asserts in Letter 121 that we mature by exercising self-care as we pass through successive psychosomatic “constitutions.” These are babyhood (infantia), childhood (pueritia), adolescence (adulescentia), and young adulthood (iuventus). The self-care described by Seneca is 'self-affiliation' (oikeiōsis, conciliatio) the linchpin of the Stoic ethical system, which defines living well as living in harmony with nature, posits that altruism develops from self-interest, and allows that pleasure and pain are indicators of well-being while denying that happiness consists in pleasure and that (...)
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  5.  67
    Augustine and the Cognitive Cause of Stoic Preliminary Passions ( Propatheiai ).Sarah C. Byers - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (4):433-448.
    Augustine made a significant contribution to the history of philosophical accounts of affectivity which scholars have not yet noticed. He resolved a problem with the Stoic theory as it was known to him: the question of the cognitive cause of "preliminary passions" ( propatheiai ), reflex-like affective reactions which must be immediately controlled if a morally bad emotion is to be avoided. He identified this cognitive cause as momentary doubt, as I demonstrate by citing passages from sermons spanning twenty-seven years (...)
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  6. "The Psychology of Compassion: A Reading of City of God 9.5".Sarah Byers - 2012 - In James Wetzel (ed.), Augustine's City of God: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. pp. 130-148.
    Writing to the young emperor Nero, Seneca elaborates a sophisticated distinction between compassion and mercy for use in forensic contexts, agreeing with earlier Stoics that compassion is a vice, but adding that there is a virtue called mercy or 'clemency.' This Stoic repudiation of compassion has won the attention of Nussbaum, who argues that it was motivated by a respect for persons as dignified agents, and was of a piece with the Stoics' cosmopolitanism. This chapter engages Nussbaum's presentation of the (...)
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  7. ‘Consubstantiality’ as a philosophical-theological problem: Victorinus’ hylomorphic model of God and his ‘correction’ by Augustine.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2022 - Scottish Journal of Theology 1 (75):12-22.
    This article expands our knowledge of the historical-philosophical process by which the dominant metaphysical account of the Christian God became ascendant. It demonstrates that Marius Victorinus proposed a peculiar model of ‘consubstantiality’ that utilised a notion of ‘existence’ indebted to the Aristotelian concept of ‘prime matter’. Victorinus employed this to argue that God is a unity composed of Father and Son. The article critically evaluates this model. It then argues that Augustine noticed one of the model's philosophical liabilities but did (...)
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  8. Love, Will, and the Intellectual Ascents.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2020 - In Tarmo Toom (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Augustine's “Confessions”. Cambridge University Press. pp. 154-174.
    Augustine’s accounts of his so-called mystical experiences in conf. 7.10.16, 17.23, and 9.10.24 are puzzling. The primary problem is that, although in all three accounts he claims to have seen “that which is,” we have no satisfactory account of what “that which is” is supposed to be. I shall be arguing that, contrary to a common interpretation, Augustine’s intellectual “seeing” of “being” in Books 7 and 9 was not a vision of the Christian God as a whole, nor of one (...)
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  9. Early Christian Ethics.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2017 - In Sacha Golob & Jens Timmermann (eds.), The Cambridge History of Moral Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 112-124.
    G.E.M. Anscombe famously claimed that ‘the Hebrew-Christian ethic’ differs from consequentialist theories in its ability to ground the claim that killing the innocent is intrinsically wrong. According to Anscombe, this is owing to its legal character, rooted in the divine decrees of the Torah. Divine decrees confer a particular moral sense of ‘ought’ by which this and other act-types can be ‘wrong’ regardless of their consequences, she maintained. There is, of course, a potentially devastating counter-example. Within the Torah, Abraham is (...)
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  10.  11
    Augustine and Wittgenstein ed. by John Doody, Alexander E. Eodice, and Kim Paffenroth.Sarah Byers - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):186-187.
    Forty years ago in this journal, Herbert Spiegelberg examined Wittgenstein's direct references to Augustine in the works that were available to the public at that time. Although there are many allusions to Augustine in the portions of the Nachlass to which Spiegelberg did not have access, Wittgenstein read only the Confessions and his interest lay in a small set of topics for which certain sentences from Augustine served him as repeated proof texts. Given these facts and given how fundamentally Wittgenstein (...)
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  11. Augustinian Puzzles About Body, Soul, Flesh, and Death.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2017 - In Justin Smith (ed.), Embodiment (Oxford Philosophical Concepts). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 87-108.
  12.  3
    Colloquium 4 Commentary on Shiffman.Sarah Byers - 2021 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 36 (1):123-128.
    This paper raises three questions about Shiffman’s thesis that Plutarch is offering a distinctive “hermeneutical philosophy” that verifies the truth of central Platonic doctrines.
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  13.  6
    Commentary on Nawar.Sarah Byers - 2017 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):160-165.
    I offer an interpretation of the Stoic “peculiar qualification” which provides for the identity of individuals over time and the distinguishability of discrete individuals. This interpretation is similar to but not the same as one of the strands in Lewis’s interpretation as presented by Nawar. I suggest that the “peculiar qualification”—what makes the individual be the individual—is the particular ἕξις or φύσις or ψυχή that is in an individual. That is, the peculiar quality is not the kind of πνεῦμα an (...)
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  14.  87
    Life as “Self Motion”: Descartes and 'The Aristotelians' on the Soul as the Life of the Body.Sarah Byers - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 59 (4):723-755.
    Argues that Descartes mistook the sense of 'motion' intended by Aristotle in the latter's definition of life as the capacity for self-motion. Descartes' arguments against Aristotelian soul-as-life-principle consequently commit the 'straw man' fallacy.
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  15. Seneca: The Life of a Stoic, Routledge, 2003. [REVIEW]Sarah Byers - 2003 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2003 (6.22).
  16. Cicero on the Emotions: Tusculan Disputations 3 and 4. [REVIEW]Sarah Catherine Byers - 2005 - International Journal of the Classical Tradition 11:468-470.
  17. Augustine[REVIEW]Sarah Byers - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (12).
  18.  75
    Augustine De Libero Arbitrio - Harrison Augustine's Way into the Will. The Theological and Philosophical Significance of De Libero Arbitrio. Pp. xii + 191. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Cased, £45. ISBN: 978-0-19-826984-7. [REVIEW]Sarah Byers - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (1):145-147.
  19. On the Trinity: Books 8-15. [REVIEW]Sarah Byers - 2003 - The Medieval Review 10.
  20.  37
    Sextus Empiricus and Pyrrhonean Scepticism. [REVIEW]Sarah Byers - 2003 - International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (3):391-392.