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  1.  16
    Exploitative, Irresistible, and Coercive Offers: Why Research Participants Should Be Paid Well or Not at All.Sara Belfrage - 2016 - Journal of Global Ethics 12 (1):69-86.
    ABSTRACTThis paper begins with the assumption that it is morally problematic when people in need are offered money in exchange for research participation if the amount offered is unfair. Such offers are called ‘coercive’, and the degree of coerciveness is determined by the offer's potential to cause exploitation and its irresistibility. Depending on what view we take on the possibility to compensate for the sacrifices made by research participants, a wish to avoid ‘coercive offers’ leads to policy recommendations concerning payment (...)
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    Willingness to Share yet Maintain Influence: A Cross-Sectional Study on Attitudes in Sweden to the Use of Electronic Health Data.Sara Belfrage, Niels Lynöe & Gert Helgesson - 2021 - Public Health Ethics 14 (1):23-34.
    We have investigated attitudes towards the use of health data among the Swedish population by analyzing data from a survey answered by 1645 persons. Health data are potentially useful for a variety of purposes. Yet information about health remains sensitive. A balance therefore has to be struck between these opposing considerations in a number of contexts. The attitudes among those whose data is concerned will influence the perceived legitimacy of policies regulating health data use. We aimed to investigate what views (...)
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  3. Trust and Digital Privacy in Healthcare: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study of Trust and Attitudes Towards Uses of Electronic Health Data Among the General Public in Sweden.Niels Lynøe, Gert Helgesson & Sara Belfrage - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundThe ability of healthcare to protect sensitive personal data in medical records and registers might influence public trust, which in turn might influence willingness to allow healthcare to use such data. The aim of this study was to examine how the general public’s trust relates to their attitudes towards uses of health data.MethodsA stratified sample from the general Swedish population received a questionnaire about their willingness to share health data. Respondents were also asked about their trust in the management and (...)
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