24 found
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  1.  12
    Gandhi’s Economics and the “Defund the Police” Movement.Michael Allen & Sanjay Lal - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):193-196.
    What do our studies of Gandhi tell us about the current crisis of health and politics in the US? The crisis intersects growing realization of the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on poor communities of color with general resistance to policing tactics and policies that are widely considered exercises of systemic racism. One significant response to this situation has been the “defund the police” movement, pressing for systemic institutional change in policing. However, for us, defund is not so much about (...)
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  2.  22
    Ahimsa as a Way of Life. [REVIEW]Sanjay Lal - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (2):150-153.
    The often heard (and justified) lament that academics do not adequately communicate their ideas to the broader general public has been particularly applicable to those theorists, like scholars of nonviolence, who work on the pressing moral issues facing our world. This work, ultimately the result of co-editor Predgrag Cicovacki’s deep and abiding interest in Jainism, does much to counter such impressions. Comprised of two volumes and forty-six chapters, Nonviolence as A Way of Life brings together insights from a notable international (...)
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  3.  42
    On Radical Forgiveness, Duty, and Justice.Sanjay Lal - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (4):677-684.
    In this essay. I explore questions pertaining to ‘radical’ acts of forgiveness as they relate to considerations of duties and justice. I will survey recent examples and show a possible philosophical basis for understanding them in terms of self-duty. Thus I will try to show that a little noticed basis exists for understanding acts of radical forgiveness as morally required (and not simply admirable or reserved for the saintly). I argue both that considerations of self-duty can provide a secular basis (...)
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  4. What Would Make For A Better World?Andrew Fitz-Gibbon, Danielle Poe, Sanjay Lal, William C. Gay & Mechthild Nagel - 2021 - The Acorn 21 (1-2):51-69.
    Andrew Fitz-Gibbon in Pragmatic Nonviolence: Working Toward a Better World argues that a principled form of pragmatism—pragmatism shaped by the theory of nonviolence—is the best hope for our world. He defines nonviolence as “a practice that, whenever possible seeks the well-being of the Other, by refusing to use violence to solve problems, and by having an intentional commitment to lovingkindness.” In the first part of the book, Fitz-Gibbon asks what a better world would look like. In the second part, he (...)
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  5. Gandhi, Epictetus, and Political Resistance.Sanjay Lal - 2019 - In Amin Asfari (ed.), Civility, Nonviolent Resistance, and the New Struggle for Social Justice. Brill | Rodopi.
  6. Gandhi’s Synthesis of Liberal and Communitarian Values: Its Basis and Insights.Sanjay Lal - 2016 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 33 (2):181-195.
    It is well known that notions of individual sovereignty, universal rights, and the duty to follow one’s own conscience are central to the philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi. The importance Gandhi places on community, tradition, and fulfilling duties particular to one’s place in life is no less noticeable in his writings. That such is the case may indicate an uneasy tension among different elements in Gandhian thought. In the first section of this paper, I argue that an underlying harmony in Gandhi’s (...)
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  7. Gandhi's Thought and Liberal Democracy.Sanjay Lal - 2019 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    This work explores issues in Gandhi scholarship, political theory, and religion. By applying core aspects of Gandhian philosophy to the present age it shows a harmony between commonly taken to be disparate aspects of social life that should interest anyone concerned about the future prospects for liberalism.
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  8.  1
    Peaceful Approaches for a More Peaceful World.Sanjay Lal (ed.) - 2022 - Leiden: Brill.
    This volume is meant for readers to gain a deeper grasp of the challenges, unique to the present age, for realizing a genuinely peaceful order as well as to consider thoughtful proposals for meeting these challenges.
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  9.  9
    Revolutionary Nondualism.Sanjay Lal - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):131-148.
    Among those who have worked for uplifting the poor, Mahatma Gandhi occupies a unique place. Although his reform efforts received ample financial support from well-off benefactors, Gandhi’s personal life exemplified ideals of voluntary poverty and renouncement. On Martha Nussbaum’s account of stoicism, Gandhi’s voluntary renouncement may imply morally unacceptable reasoning regarding nonviolence and the plight of the poor. Nussbaum argues that the stoic disparagement of external things of fortune implies that they cannot coherently oppose external harms such as torture or (...)
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  10.  31
    Hume and Gandhi.Sanjay Lal - 2010 - The Acorn 14 (1):14-18.
    Key aspects of Mahatma Gandhi’s ethical theory can be understood by way of the framework provided by David Hume’s ethics. While respecting contextual differences as well as those in over all outlook between a Sanatani Hindu reformer and a Western empiricist, I show that Gandhi and Hume mutually illuminate each other’s thought on significant ethical matters. These matters are: (1) The inability of reason to produce action (2) The relationship of reason to the emotions (3) The importance of the commonality (...)
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  11.  7
    Does Liberal Democracy Require a Gandhian Approach to Religion? [REVIEW]Sanjay Lal, Jeff Shawn Jose, Douglas Allen & Michael Allen - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):101-129.
    In this author-meets-critics dialogue, Sanjay Lal, author of, argues that Gandhian values of nonviolence raise aspirations of liberal democracy to a higher level. Since Gandhian values of nonviolence are closely associated with religious values, liberal democracy should make public commitments to religions on a non-sectarian basis, except for unreasonable religions. Critic Jeff Shawn Jose agrees that Gandhian values can strengthen liberal democracy. However, Jose finds a contradiction in Lal’s proposal that a liberal state should support reasonable religions only. A more (...)
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  12.  8
    Revolutionary Nondualism.Sanjay Lal - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):131-148.
    Among those who have worked for uplifting the poor, Mahatma Gandhi occupies a unique place. Although his reform efforts received ample financial support from well-off benefactors, Gandhi’s personal life exemplified ideals of voluntary poverty and renouncement. On Martha Nussbaum’s account of stoicism, Gandhi’s voluntary renouncement may imply morally unacceptable reasoning regarding nonviolence and the plight of the poor. Nussbaum argues that the stoic disparagement of external things of fortune implies that they cannot coherently oppose external harms such as torture or (...)
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  13.  20
    The Relevance of Northern Ireland. [REVIEW]Sanjay Lal - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (1):79-81.
    To Andrew Fitz-Gibbon the history of Northern Ireland provides much useful insight by which progress can be made in the on-going (and seemingly never ending) vicious conflicts between Israelis and Palestinians that our world has not been able to break free of. In the first three chapters of “Talking to Terrorists” the Northern Ireland conflicts are placed within a very accessible and surprisingly thorough (given the book’s brevity) context. In his final chapter “Toward a Peaceful Future” Fitz-Gibbon identifies and elaborates (...)
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  14.  22
    Gandhi Philosopher. [REVIEW]Sanjay Lal - 2016 - The Acorn 16 (1-2):55-59.
    Alongside Bindhu Puri’s The Tagore-Gandhi Debate on Matters of Truth and Untruth and Predrag Cicovacki’s Gandhi’s Footprints (see further discussion in this issue) can be placed Anuradha Veeravalli’s Gandhi in Political Theory: Truth, Law, and Experiment as a significant contribution to the aim of showing the academic bona fides of Gandhian philosophy. Though technically, Veeravalli’s explicit emphasis is on understanding Gandhi as a political theorist and not as a philosopher per se, the philosophical import of her attempts to explicate the (...)
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  15.  10
    From Canons of Peace to Shoots of Resistance.Greg Moses & Sanjay Lal - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):1-3.
    In our feature presentation, “Mahatma Gandhi’s Philosophy of Nonviolence and Truth" Douglas Allen explicates central Gandhian values and concepts in a way that gives readers a kind of ‘one stop’ source for appreciating Gandhi’s nonviolence. In an author-meets-critics dialogue, Court Lewis, author of Repentance and the Right to Forgiveness, defends and clarifies his argument that wrongdoers have a right to forgiveness. Our reviews in this issue invite comparative analysis: Philip J. Rossi’s book on The Ethical Commonwealth in History; a collection (...)
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  16.  19
    The Acorn Visions.Barry L. Gan, Sanjay Lal & Greg Moses - 2016 - The Acorn 16 (1-2):3-8.
    After decades of service to The Acorn, editor Barry Gan--who received the journal from founding editor Ha Poong Kim--has passed the responsibility along. We are happy to announce that the editorial and business office of The Acorn has found a new home at the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies of Texas State University. For more than a decade, The Acorn has been affiliated with a society that we have recently renamed the Gandhi, King, Chavez, Addams Society (GKCAS). The new (...)
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  17.  37
    Gandhi's Universal Ethic and Feminism: Shared Starting Points but Divergent Ends.Sanjay Lal - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (2):185 – 195.
    Like the dominant moral philosophers in the Western tradition, Mahatma Gandhi reaches moral conclusions that emphasize universality, impartiality, and detachment. This is in apparent contrast to feminist philosophers who have put forth a scheme for reaching moral conclusions that gives centrality to feeling, experience, and interdependence. In the following, I show that Gandhi shares significant agreement with feminists in spite of the kinds of moral conclusions he reaches. The crucial difference between Gandhi and the feminist critics lies in how the (...)
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  18.  15
    Affirming a Vital Connection.Sanjay Lal - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (1):33-51.
    Having freedom from the fear of death is a quality needed not just by peace activists; however, it is in particular need of affirmation by those espousing a philosophy of nonviolence. A rich philosophical literature explores the supposed harmfulness of death, but the topic is scarcely discussed by peace theorists. This paper shows the significance of the topic for highlighting the attractiveness of nonviolent philosophy given certain non-religious understandings of death that are well suited for advancing nonviolence. Classic Stoic and (...)
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  19.  14
    On Widening The Moral Sphere.Sanjay Lal - 2015 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):1-11.
    Considerations of justice and rights are assumed to present problems for the idea that we should do that which we take to be supererogatory. I argue that careful consideration of how we think of justice and rights lead to the conclusion that "supererogatory" actions are actually better grouped within the class of acts we identify as moral requirements. My argument is based on our common understanding of justice as being incompatible with free-riding. Additionally, I focus attention on our implicit assumption (...)
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  20.  14
    Clarifying The Place Of Love In Gandhian Non-Violence.Sanjay Lal - 2015 - The Acorn 15 (2):23-27.
    Though it is clear that in Gandhi’s mind nonviolence and love are equivalent to one another, it is not so difficult to think of situations indicative of a real tension between these two concepts. This is the case given common understandings we have of love. I argue that for Gandhi these apparent tensions are resolved when we consider the degree to which certain necessary conditions are present in any given acts of love. Thus I show that Gandhi’s view regarding the (...)
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  21.  3
    Gandhi for the Twenty-First Century. [REVIEW]Douglas Allen, Sanjay Lal & Karsten Struhl - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):75-99.
    In this author-meets-critics dialogue, Douglas Allen, author of argues that Gandhi-informed philosophies and practices, when creatively reformulated and applied, are essential for developing positions that are ethical, nonviolent, truthful, and sustainable, providing resources and hope for confronting our ‘Gandhi after 9/11’ crises. Critics Sanjay Lal and Karsten Struhl applaud Allen’s demonstration that Gandhi’s nonviolence is serious and broadly adaptable to the twenty-first century. Yet, Lal poses two philosophical challenges, arguing first that the nonviolent message of the Bhagavad Gita is perhaps (...)
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  22.  9
    Author Meets Critics. [REVIEW]Predrag Cicovacki, Carlo Filice & Sanjay Lal - 2016 - The Acorn 16 (1-2):41-52.
    Two critics respond to Predrag Cicovacki’s book, Gandi’s Footprints. Cicovacki opens the discussion by presenting his motivations for exploring a paradox, that Gandhi’s work is widely revered but not widely emulated. Cicovacki explores a resolution to the paradox by suggesting how Gandhi’s promising visions may be followed without being imitated, especially Gandhi’s insight that we must seek spiritual grounding for life in a materialistic world. Critic Sanjay Lal affirms Cicovacki’s insight but suggests that precisely because Gandhi’s aspirations for spiritual life (...)
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  23.  8
    Author Meets Critics. [REVIEW]Predrag Cicovacki, Carlo Filice & Sanjay Lal - 2016 - The Acorn 16 (2):41-52.
    Two critics respond to Predrag Cicovacki’s book, Gandi’s Footprints. Cicovacki opens the discussion by presenting his motivations for exploring a paradox, that Gandhi’s work is widely revered but not widely emulated. Cicovacki explores a resolution to the paradox by suggesting how Gandhi’s promising visions may be followed without being imitated, especially Gandhi’s insight that we must seek spiritual grounding for life in a materialistic world. Critic Sanjay Lal affirms Cicovacki’s insight but suggests that precisely because Gandhi’s aspirations for spiritual life (...)
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  24.  3
    On Becoming Worthy of Victory.Sanjay Lal - 2019 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 25 (1):21-26.
    While there has been no shortage of philosophical writings dealing with humanity’s great struggles there is a notable absence within academic philosophy in asserting a broad, overriding, and natural place for philosophical analysis regarding such issues—a role which can be crucial in making us better people. In the first part of this paper, I will discuss the notable absence of certain character traits on the part of activists fighting for a better world that are essential for attaining the lofty goals (...)
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