Results for 'Sandra D. Nicks'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  45
    The rise and fall of deception in social psychology and personality research, 1921 to 1994.Sandra D. Nicks, James H. Korn & Tina Mainieri - 1997 - Ethics and Behavior 7 (1):69 – 77.
    The frequency of the use of deception in American psychological research was studied by reviewing articles from journals in personality and social psychology from 1921 to 1994. Deception was used rarely during the developmental years of social psychology into the 1930s, then grew gradually and irregularly until the 1950s. Between the 1950s and 1970s the use of deception increased significantly. This increase is attributed to changes in experimental methods, the popularity of realistic impact experiments, and the influence of cognitive dissonance (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  2.  73
    After Fifty Years, Why Are Protein X-ray Crystallographers Still in Business?Sandra D. Mitchell & Angela M. Gronenborn - 2015 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axv051.
    It has long been held that the structure of a protein is determined solely by the interactions of the atoms in the sequence of amino acids of which it is composed, and thus the stable, biologically functional conformation should be predictable by ab initio or de novo methods. However, except for small proteins, ab initio predictions have not been successful. We explain why this is the case and argue that the relationship among the different methods, models, and representations of protein (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  3.  94
    Competing units of selection?: A case of symbiosis.Sandra D. Mitchell - 1987 - Philosophy of Science 54 (3):351-367.
    The controversy regarding the unit of selection is fundamentally a dispute about what is the correct causal structure of the process of evolution by natural selection and its ontological commitments. By characterizing the process as consisting of two essential steps--interaction and transmission--a singular answer to the unit question becomes ambiguous. With such an account on hand, two recent defenses of competing units of selection are considered. Richard Dawkins maintains that the gene is the appropriate unit of selection and Robert Brandon, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   74 citations  
  4.  60
    Unsimple Truths: Science, Complexity, and Policy.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2009 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    The world is complex, but acknowledging its complexity requires an appreciation for the many roles context plays in shaping natural phenomena. In _Unsimple Truths, _Sandra Mitchell argues that the long-standing scientific and philosophical deference to reductive explanations founded on simple universal laws, linear causal models, and predict-and-act strategies fails to accommodate the kinds of knowledge that many contemporary sciences are providing about the world. She advocates, instead, for a new understanding that represents the rich, variegated, interdependent fabric of many levels (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   178 citations  
  5. Ceteris paribus — an inadequate representation for biological contingency.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2002 - Erkenntnis 57 (3):329-350.
    It has been claimed that ceteris paribus laws, rather than strict laws are the proper aim of the special sciences. This is so because the causal regularities found in these domains are exception-ridden, being contingent on the presence of the appropriate conditions and the absence of interfering factors. I argue that the ceteris paribus strategy obscures rather than illuminates the important similarities and differences between representations of causal regularities in the exact and inexact sciences. In particular, a detailed account of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  6.  48
    Dispositions or Etiologies? A Comment On Bigelow and Pargetter.Sandra D. Mitchell - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (5):249-259.
  7. Integrative pluralism.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (1):55-70.
    The `fact' of pluralism in science is nosurprise. Yet, if science is representing andexplaining the structure of the oneworld, why is there such a diversity ofrepresentations and explanations in somedomains? In this paper I consider severalphilosophical accounts of scientific pluralismthat explain the persistence of bothcompetitive and compatible alternatives. PaulSherman's `Levels of Analysis' account suggeststhat in biology competition betweenexplanations can be partitioned by the type ofquestion being investigated. I argue that thisaccount does not locate competition andcompatibility correctly. I then defend anintegrative (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   81 citations  
  8. Dimensions of scientific law.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (2):242-265.
    Biological knowledge does not fit the image of science that philosophers have developed. Many argue that biology has no laws. Here I criticize standard normative accounts of law and defend an alternative, pragmatic approach. I argue that a multidimensional conceptual framework should replace the standard dichotomous law/ accident distinction in order to display important differences in the kinds of causal structure found in nature and the corresponding scientific representations of those structures. To this end I explore the dimensions of stability, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   119 citations  
  9.  53
    The causal background of functional explanation.Sandra D. Mitchell - 1989 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 3 (2):213 – 229.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  10. Pragmatic laws.Sandra D. Mitchell - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):479.
    Beatty, Brandon, and Sober agree that biological generalizations, when contingent, do not qualify as laws. Their conclusion follows from a normative definition of law inherited from the Logical Empiricists. I suggest two additional approaches: paradigmatic and pragmatic. Only the pragmatic represents varying kinds and degrees of contingency and exposes the multiple relationships found among scientific generalizations. It emphasizes the function of laws in grounding expectation and promotes the evaluation of generalizations along continua of ontological and representational parameters. Stability of conditions (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   85 citations  
  11.  26
    Comment: Taming Causal Complexity.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2008 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 125.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  12.  13
    Changing Methods: Feminists Transforming Practice.Sandra D. Burt & Lorraine Code (eds.) - 1995 - Broadview Press.
    Changing Methods is a collection of original essays by feminist practitioners, scholars, and activists. The authors show why "the method question" has moved to the top of many feminist research and interpretive research strategies, and engage in thinking about how ideas and actions have developed within complex social circumstances. The essays in this book challenge the tradition that has allowed abstracted, formalized versions of the ideas and experiences of privileged white men to set standards for how everyone should conduct themselves. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13.  68
    After Fifty Years, Why Are Protein X-ray Crystallographers Still in Business?Sandra D. Mitchell & Angela M. Gronenborn - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 68 (3):703-723.
    ABSTRACT It has long been held that the structure of a protein is determined solely by the interactions of the atoms in the sequence of amino acids of which it is composed, and thus the stable, biologically functional conformation should be predictable by ab initio or de novo methods. However, except for small proteins, ab initio predictions have not been successful. We explain why this is the case and argue that the relationship among the different methods, models, and representations of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  14.  31
    Preface.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2003 - Philosophy of Science 70 (5):vii-vii.
  15.  54
    Biological Complexity and Integrative Pluralism.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    This fine collection of essays by a leading philosopher of science presents a defence of integrative pluralism as the best description for the complexity of scientific inquiry today. The tendency of some scientists to unify science by reducing all theories to a few fundamental laws of the most basic particles that populate our universe is ill-suited to the biological sciences, which study multi-component, multi-level, evolved complex systems. This integrative pluralism is the most efficient way to understand the different and complex (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   172 citations  
  16.  41
    Through the Fractured Looking Glass.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2020 - Philosophy of Science 87 (5):771-792.
    I argue that diversity and pluralism are valuable not just for science but for philosophy of science. Given the partiality and perspectivism of representation, pluralism preserving integration can...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  57
    Explaining complex behavior.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2008 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 19--38.
  18.  90
    Function, fitness and disposition.Sandra D. Mitchell - 1995 - Biology and Philosophy 10 (1):39-54.
    In this paper I discuss recent debates concerning etiological theories of functions. I defend an etiological theory against two criticisms, namely the ability to account for malfunction, and the problem of structural doubles. I then consider the arguments provided by Bigelow and Pargetter (1987) for a more forward looking account of functions as propensities or dispositions. I argue that their approach fails to address the explanatory problematic for which etiological theories were developed.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  19.  37
    Anthropomorphism: Cross-species modeling.Sandra D. Mitchell - unknown
    There has been a recent resurgence of interest in anthropomorphism, attributable to both the rise of cognitive ethology and the requirements of various forms of expanded, environmental ethics. The manner and degree to which non-human animals are similar to human beings has thus become a focus of scientific research and a necessary component to our decisions to act morally. At its basis, anthropomorphism involves claims about the similarity of non-human objects or beings to humans. Critics of anthropomorphism often attack the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  72
    The Import of Uncertainty.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2000 - The Pluralist 2 (1):58 - 71.
    In this paper I argue that two domains of uncertainty should inform our strategies for making social policy on new genetic technologies. The first is biological complexity, which includes both unknown consequences on known variables and unknown unknowns. The second is value pluralism, which includes both moral conflict and moral pluralism. This framework is used to investigate policy on genetically modified food and suggests that adaptive management is required to track changes in biological knowledge of these interventions and that less (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21. Judging the Other: Responding to Traditional Female Genital Surgeries.Sandra D. Lane & Robert A. Rubinstein - 1996 - Hastings Center Report 26 (3):31-40.
    Western feminists, physicians, and ethicists condemn the traditional genital surgeries performed on women in some non‐Western cultures. But coming to moral judgment is not the end of the story; we must also decide what to do about our judgments. We must learn to work respectfully with, not independently of, local resources for cultural self‐examination and change.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  22. Perspectives, Representation, and Integration.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2020 - In Michela Massimi & Casey D. McCoy (eds.), Understanding Perspectivism (Open Access): Scientific Challenges and Methodological Prospects. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 178-193.
    In Chapter 10, Sandra D. Mitchell addresses the relations between many models that arise from the partiality of representation. She defends the idea that multiple compatible models can be integrated in a way that increases scientific knowledge. To illustrate how her “integrative pluralism” works, she shows how three perspectives on protein folding—the physical, the chemical, and the biological perspective—can “fill out” and correct one another.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Exporting causal knowledge in evolutionary and developmental biology.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (5):697-706.
    In this article I consider the challenges for exporting causal knowledge raised by complex biological systems. In particular, James Woodward’s interventionist approach to causality identified three types of stability in causal explanation: invariance, modularity, and insensitivity. I consider an example of robust degeneracy in genetic regulatory networks and knockout experimental practice to pose methodological and conceptual questions for our understanding of causal explanation in biology. †To contact the author, please write to: Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  24.  22
    The Bearable Thinness of Being: A Pragmatist Metaphysics of Affordances.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2023 - In H. K. Andersen & Sandra D. Mitchell (eds.), The Pragmatist Challenge: Pragmatist Metaphysics for Philosophy of Science. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Taking a pragmatist stance toward the practices and products of science shapes our answers to central philosophical questions. In argue that from within a perspective consisting of goals, actions and questions, what we say there is and what we say it does, is justified by the ongoing interactions among representative models, causal experience and experiment, and conceptual frameworks in reaching a fallible convergence to what is real. I offer a non-dichotomous alternative. I propose an alternative to fundamentalist approaches, arguing that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  9
    The units of behavior in evolutionary explanations.Sandra D. Mitchell - 1996 - In Dale Jamieson & Marc Bekoff (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 129--142.
  26.  22
    Can Sociobiology Adapt to Cultural Selection?Sandra D. Mitchell - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:87 - 96.
    Sociobiologists explain human social behavior as genetically adapative. The intervention of cultural learning into the processes of the acquisition and transmission of human behavior makes such explanation prima facie unjustified. William Durham has developed a theory of coevolution which claims that although the processes of genetic evolution and cultural evolution are independent, the results of the two processes are "functionally complementary." In this paper I characterize the conditions necessary for giving an explanation by adaptation of human behavior and argue that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  16
    Perceptual load does not modulate auditory distractor processing.Sandra Murphy, Nick Fraenkel & Polly Dalton - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):345-355.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28.  21
    The landscape of integrative pluralism.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2024 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 38 (3):261-297.
    In this essay, I revisit and extend my arguments for a view of science that is pluralistic, perspectival and pragmatist. I attempt to resolve mismatches between metaphysical assumptions, epistemological desiderata, and scientific practice. I consider long-held views about unity of science and reductionism, emergent properties and physicalism, exceptionless necessity in explanatory laws, and in the justification for realism. My solutions appeal to the partiality of representation, the perspectivism of theories and data, and the interactive co-construction of warranted claims for realism.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Human by Nature.Peter Weingart, Sandra D. Mitchell, Peter J. Richerson & Sabine Maasen (eds.) - 1997 - London:
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Emergence: logical, functional and dynamical. [REVIEW]Sandra D. Mitchell - 2012 - Synthese 185 (2):171-186.
    Philosophical accounts of emergence have been explicated in terms of logical relationships between statements (derivation) or static properties (function and realization). Jaegwon Kim is a modern proponent. A property is emergent if it is not explainable by (or reducible to) the properties of lower level components. This approach, I will argue, is unable to make sense of the kinds of emergence that are widespread in scientific explanations of complex systems. The standard philosophical notion of emergence posits the wrong dichotomies, confuses (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  31.  41
    Instrumental Perspectivism: Is AI Machine Learning Technology like NMR Spectroscopy?Sandra D. Mitchell - unknown
    The question, “Will science remain human?” expresses a worry that deep learning algorithms will replace scientists in making crucial judgments of classification and inference and that something crucial will be lost if that happens. Ever since the introduction of telescopes and microscopes humans have relied on technologies to “extend” beyond human sensory perception in acquiring scientific knowledge. In this paper I explore whether the ways in which new learning technologies “extend” beyond human cognitive aspects of science can be treated instrumentally. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. The Pragmatist Challenge: Pragmatist Metaphysics for Philosophy of Science.H. K. Andersen & Sandra D. Mitchell (eds.) - 2023 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This volume offers a collection of in-depth explorations of pragmatism as a framework for discussions in philosophy of science and metaphysics. Each chapter involves explicit reflection on what it means to be pragmatist, and how to use pragmatism as a guiding framework in addressing topics such as realism, unification, fundamentality, truth, laws, reduction, and more. -/- .
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  13
    Measuring Job Crafting Across Cultures: Lessons Learned From Comparing a German and an Australian Sample.Vivian Schachler, Sandra D. Epple, Elisa Clauss, Annekatrin Hoppe, Gavin R. Slemp & Matthias Ziegler - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  80
    Modularity—More Than a Buzzword? [REVIEW]Sandra D. Mitchell - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (1):98-101.
  35.  29
    Vittorio Hösle;, Christian Illies .Darwinism and Philosophy. 392 pp., figs., table, bibls., index. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2005. $70 ; $35. [REVIEW]Sandra D. Mitchell - 2007 - Isis 98 (3):664-665.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. David E. Fisher: Much Ado about (Practically) Nothing. A History of the Noble Gases. [REVIEW]Sandra D. Hojniak - 2011 - Foundations of Chemistry 13 (2):167-169.
    David E. Fisher: Much Ado about (Practically) Nothing. A History of the Noble Gases Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s10698-011-9114-0 Authors Sandra D. Hojniak, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, 3001 Leuven, Belgium Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  14
    Self Organization and Adaptation in Insect Societies.Robert E. Page & Sandra D. Mitchell - 1990 - PSA Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990 (2):289-298.
    The social organization of insect colonies has fascinated biologists and natural historians for centuries. Aristotle wrote in History of Animals about a division of labor among workers within the hive that is based on age. He observed that the field bees foraging for nectar and pollen have less “hair” on their bodies than the hive bees that care for young larvae and tend the nest. He concluded that the more pubescent hive bees must be older. We now know that, in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  36
    Self Organization and Adaptation in Insect Societies.Robert E. Page & Sandra D. Mitchell - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:289 - 298.
    Division of labor and its associated phenomena have been viewed as prime examples of group-level adaptations. However, the adaptations are the result of the process of evolution by natural selection and thus require that groups of insects once existed and competed for reproduction, some of which had a heritable division of labor while others did not. We present models, based on those of Kauffman (1984) that demonstrate how division of labor may occur spontaneously among groups of mutually tolerant individuals. We (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  39.  28
    Some differences among students volunteering as research subjects.David O. Richter, Sandra D. Wilson, Michael Milner & R. J. Senter - 1981 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 17 (6):261-263.
  40.  10
    Modularity—More Than a Buzzword? [REVIEW]Sandra D. Mitchell - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (1):98-101.
  41. Multilevel Research Strategies and Biological Systems.Maureen A. O’Malley, Ingo Brigandt, Alan C. Love, John W. Crawford, Jack A. Gilbert, Rob Knight, Sandra D. Mitchell & Forest Rohwer - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (5):811-828.
    Multilevel research strategies characterize contemporary molecular inquiry into biological systems. We outline conceptual, methodological, and explanatory dimensions of these multilevel strategies in microbial ecology, systems biology, protein research, and developmental biology. This review of emerging lines of inquiry in these fields suggests that multilevel research in molecular life sciences has significant implications for philosophical understandings of explanation, modeling, and representation.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  42.  47
    Rough waters between genes and culture: An anthropological and philosophical view on coevolution. [REVIEW]Monique Borgerhoff Mulder & Sandra D. Mitchell - 1994 - Biology and Philosophy 9 (4):471-487.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  31
    Symposium: Are There Laws in Biology?John Beatty, Robert Brandon, Elliott Sober & Sandra D. Mitchell - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):S432 - S479.
    This is a collection of papers presented at the Symposium "Are There are Laws of Biology?", in the 1996 Biennial Meetings of the Philosophy of Science Association. It includes four separate papers: "Why Do Biologists Argue Like They Do?" by John Beatty, "Does Biology Have Laws? The Experimental Evidence" by Robert Brandon, "Two Outbreaks of Lawlessness in Recent Philosophy of Biology" by Elliott Sober, and "Pragmatic Laws" by Sandra D. Mitchell.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  35
    Wallace, Turner, and Perkins revisited.R. J. Senter, David O. Richter, Sandra D. Wilson & Debbie Clements - 1982 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (3):178-179.
  45.  5
    Predicting Hidden Links in Supply Networks.A. Brintrup, P. Wichmann, P. Woodall, D. McFarlane, E. Nicks & W. Krechel - 2018 - Complexity 2018:1-12.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  50
    Titles and abstracts for the Pitt-London Workshop in the Philosophy of Biology and Neuroscience: September 2001.Karen Arnold, James Bogen, Ingo Brigandt, Joe Cain, Paul Griffiths, Catherine Kendig, James Lennox, Alan C. Love, Peter Machamer, Jacqueline Sullivan, Sandra D. Mitchell, David Papineau, Karola Stotz & D. M. Walsh - 2001
    Titles and abstracts for the Pitt-London Workshop in the Philosophy of Biology and Neuroscience: September 2001.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  19
    Changes in United States Latino/a High School Students’ Science Motivational Beliefs: Within Group Differences Across Science Subjects, Gender, Immigrant Status, and Perceived Support.Ta-Yang Hsieh, Yangyang Liu & Sandra D. Simpkins - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Science motivational beliefs are crucial for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) performance and persistence, but these beliefs typically decline during high school. We expanded the literature on adolescents’ science motivational beliefs by examining: 1) changes in motivational beliefs in three specific science subjects, 2) how gender, immigrant generation status, and perceived support from key social agents predicted differences in adolescents’ science motivational beliefs, and 3) these processes among Latino/as in the United States, whose underrepresentation in STEM is understudied. We (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48. Decision by sampling.Nick Chater & Gordon D. A. Brown - unknown
    We present a theory of decision by sampling (DbS) in which, in contrast with traditional models, there are no underlying psychoeconomic scales. Instead, we assume that an attribute’s subjective value is constructed from a series of binary, ordinal comparisons to a sample of attribute values drawn from memory and is its rank within the sample. We assume that the sample reflects both the immediate distribution of attribute values from the current decision’s context and also the background, real-world distribution of attribute (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  49.  72
    Session 2: Female orgasms and evolutionary theory.Elisabeth Lloyd, Karen Arnold, Sandra D. Mitchell & Wendy Parker - manuscript
    Proceedings of the Pittsburgh Workshop in History and Philosophy of Biology, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, March 23-24 2001 Session 2: Female Orgasms and Evolutionary Theory.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  33
    Scale-invariance as a unifying psychological principle.Nick Chater & Gordon D. A. Brown - 1999 - Cognition 69 (3):B17-B24.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000