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  1.  29
    Contemporary Issues Concerning Informed Consent in Japan Based on a Review of Court Decisions and Characteristics of Japanese Culture.Sakiko Masaki, Hiroko Ishimoto & Atsushi Asai - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):8.
    Since Japan adopted the concept of informed consent from the West, its inappropriate acquisition from patients in the Japanese clinical setting has continued, due in part to cultural aspects. Here, we discuss the current status of and contemporary issues surrounding informed consent in Japan, and how these are influenced by Japanese culture.
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  2.  13
    Matters to address prior to introducing new life support technology in Japan: three serious ethical concerns related to the use of left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy and suggested policies to deal with them.Atsushi Asai, Sakiko Masaki, Taketoshi Okita, Aya Enzo & Yasuhiro Kadooka - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):12.
    Destination therapy is the permanent implantation of a left ventricular assist device in patients with end-stage, severe heart failure who are ineligible for heart transplantation. DT improves both the quality of life and prognosis of patients with end-stage heart failure. However, there are also downsides to DT such as life-threatening complications and the potential for the patient to live beyond their desired length of life following such major complications. Because of deeply ingrained cultural and religious beliefs regarding death and the (...)
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  3.  19
    Matters to Address Prior to Introducing New Life Support Technology in Japan: Three Serious Ethical Concerns Related to the Use of Left Ventricular Assist Devices as Destination Therapy and Suggested Policies to Deal with Them.Atsushi Asai, Sakiko Masaki, Taketoshi Okita, Aya Enzo & Yasuhiro Kadooka - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):1-8.
    Background Destination therapy is the permanent implantation of a left ventricular assist device in patients with end-stage, severe heart failure who are ineligible for heart transplantation. DT improves both the quality of life and prognosis of patients with end-stage heart failure. However, there are also downsides to DT such as life-threatening complications and the potential for the patient to live beyond their desired length of life following such major complications. Because of deeply ingrained cultural and religious beliefs regarding death and (...)
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  4.  15
    Should a Brain-Dead Pregnant Woman Be Provided Somatic Support to Save the Life of the Fetus?Sakiko Masaki, Hiroko Ishimoto, Yasuhiro Kadooka & Atsushi Asai - 2016 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 26 (4):130-136.
    In recent years, a number of news stories were reported worldwide involving brain-dead pregnant women. Debates over providing life support to braindead pregnant women and delivery of their children have been around for some decades. Maintaining a woman’s life solely for fetal viability has become a major controversial social issue. Opposing opinions exist where one side supports the woman and her child should be left to die in dignity and the other side claims to protect the unborn child’s right to (...)
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  5.  26
    Seeing-Off of Dead Bodies at Death Discharges in Japan.Sakiko Masaki & Atsushi Asai - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (2):131-136.
    For most death discharge patients, hospitals in Japan offer seeing-off services, a practice characteristic of Japanese culture. When a patient dies, nurses usually perform after-death procedures before transferring the body to the mortuary, where the nurses and doctors gather to provide the seeing-off service. This study was carried out to determine differences between the nurses’ and bereaved families’ opinions and thoughts regarding the seeing-off service. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 nurses and 6 bereaved families . The interviews assessed: the (...)
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    Should an Incapacitated Patient’s Refusal of Treatment Be Respected? Discussion of a Hypothetical Case.Hiroko Ishimoto, Sakiko Masaki & Atsushi Asai - 2015 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 25 (4):112-118.
    In the present super-aging society, issues concerning what treatment should be given for incapacitated patients have become more important than ever before. This paper discusses whether or not an incapacitated patient’s refusal of treatment should be respected. The authors present a complete hypothetical scenario involving a 75-year-old moderately demented man suffering from malignant lymphoma. Of primary importance are the respect for patient dignity and the protection of human rights. Acts such as coercion, disregard, restriction, and surveillance can be unethical in (...)
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  7.  2
    Doubt the Analects: An Educational Session Using the Analects in Medical Ethics in Japan.Atsushi Asai, Yasuhiro Kadooka & Sakiko Masaki - 2014 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 24 (5):138-141.
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