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  1. Plato's Cratylus: The Comedy of Language.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2013 - Indiana University Press.
    Plato’s dialogue Cratylus focuses on being and human dependence on words, or the essential truths about the human condition. Arguing that comedy is an essential part of Plato's concept of language, S. Montgomery Ewegen asserts that understanding the comedic is key to an understanding of Plato's deeper philosophical intentions. Ewegen shows how Plato’s view of language is bound to comedy through words and how, for Plato, philosophy has much in common with playfulness and the ridiculous. By tying words, language, and (...)
     
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  2.  2
    Fighting Fire with Fire: Thinking Φύσις at the Inception.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2021 - Research in Phenomenology 51 (3):414-425.
    This essay explores the role of flame in Heidegger’s 1943–44 lectures on Heraclitus. Specifically, I trace a tension that unfolds within the text between two flames: namely, “the flames of presumptuous mismeasurement” characteristic of modernity, and the flames of beyng. As I show, in GA 55 Heidegger argues that a certain Seinsvergessenheit has come to dominate the modern world and has resulted in an attitude of hubris on the part of the human being. As a corrective to this hubris, Heraclitus’s (...)
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  3.  4
    Guest Editors' Introduction.Michael Shaw & S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2021 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):235-236.
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  4.  18
    The Phaedrus - Werner Myth and Philosophy in Plato's Phaedrus. Pp. VI + 302. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Cased, £65, Us$99. Isbn: 978-1-107-02128-0. [REVIEW]S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):58-60.
  5.  37
    Being Just? Just Being.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2012 - Philosophy Today 56 (3):285-294.
  6.  39
    Apotheosis of Actuality: Kierkegaard’s Poetic Life.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):509-523.
    By way of an interaction with Kierkegaard’s Point of View, this paper attempts to show the extent to which Kierkegaard’s Repetition was a poetic repetition of his own life. By comparing several of his published texts with journal entries and letters to friends, this paper traces the extent and degree of Kierkegaard’s poetic reflection and corresponding lack of existential immediacy. At its most extreme, this paper argues that Kierkegaard did not really exist in the typical sense of the term; or, (...)
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  7. Being Just? Just Being: Heidegger’s Just Thinking.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2012 - Philosophy Today 56 (3):285-294.
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  8. The Human and History.Karl Löwith, J. Goesser Assaiante & S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2021 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 2 (1):33-60.
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  9.  31
    A Unity of Opposites: Heidegger’s Journey Through Plato.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):373-388.
    In his 1942 lectures on Hölderlin’s der Ister, Heidegger discerns within Hölderlin’s poetry a movement beyond the strictures of metaphysics and its representational language. This movement finds its most explicit articulation in the figure of the appropriative journey of the poet from the home into the land of the foreign fire. I argue that Heidegger’s reading of Hölderlin is rendered problematic by Heidegger’s own treatment of Plato’s ‘Myth of Er’ as it appears in his 1942–1943 Parmenides lectures, and that Heidegger’s (...)
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  10.  10
    Colloquium 4 A Man of No Substance: The Philosopher in Plato’s Gorgias.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2018 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):95-112.
    At the center of Plato’s Gorgias, the shameless and irascible Callicles offers an attack against philosophy. During this attack, he describes philosophy as a pastime fit only for the young which, if practiced beyond the bloom of youth, threatens to render those who practice it politically inept and powerless. Moreover, when taken too far, philosophy provokes the city into stripping the philosopher of all of his rights and property, leaving him with no οὐσία at all. Thus, according to Callicles, far (...)
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  11.  21
    Thomson, Iain D. Heidegger, Art, and Postmodernity.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 66 (2):388-390.
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  12.  9
    An Inconsistent Ado About Matters of No Consequence': Comic Turns in Plato's "Euthydemus.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2014 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):15-32.
    Scholarship on the Euthydemus has largely focused on the protreptic character of the Euthydemus—that is, the manner by which Socrates attempts to turn the young Cleinias toward philosophy. By focusing on the dramatic structure of the text, and above all its comic tenor, this article argues that it is Crito—he to whom Socrates tells his hilarious story of his encounter with the two sophist-brothers—who is the real object of Socrates’s protreptic speech.
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  13.  2
    Res Publica: Plato’s Republic in Classical German Philosophy, Written by Günther Zöller.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2016 - Polis 33 (1):224-228.
  14.  3
    A Unity of Opposites: Heidegger’s Journey Through Plato.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):373-388.
    In his 1942 lectures on Hölderlin’s der Ister, Heidegger discerns within Hölderlin’s poetry a movement beyond the strictures of metaphysics and its representational language. This movement finds its most explicit articulation in the figure of the appropriative journey of the poet from the home into the land of the foreign fire. I argue that Heidegger’s reading of Hölderlin is rendered problematic by Heidegger’s own treatment of Plato’s ‘Myth of Er’ as it appears in his 1942–1943 Parmenides lectures, and that Heidegger’s (...)
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  15.  3
    Gestures of the Feminine in Heidegger's “Die Sprache”.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2016 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 30 (4):486.
    We hardly know what the word is capable of.In his “Die Sprache,” Heidegger attempts a radical reversal of the metaphysical understanding of language as the activity or tool by which human beings express themselves. Rather than seeking to clarify the nature of language as a property or tool of the human subject, Heidegger stages an encounter with language wherein the attempt is made to let language itself, independently of the intentions of a human speaker, speak for itself and in such (...)
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