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Stephen Honeybul [8]S. Honeybul [4]
  1.  49
    Neurotrauma and the rule of rescue.S. Honeybul, G. R. Gillett, K. M. Ho & C. R. P. Lind - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):707-710.
    The rule of rescue describes the powerful human proclivity to rescue identified endangered lives, regardless of cost or risk. Deciding whether or not to perform a decompressive craniectomy as a life-saving or ‘rescue’ procedure for a young person with a severe traumatic brain injury provides a good example of the ethical tensions that occur in these situations. Unfortunately, there comes a point when the primary brain injury is so severe that if the patient survives they are likely to remain severely (...)
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  2.  23
    Paper: Neurotrauma and the RUB: where tragedy meets ethics and science.G. R. Gillett, S. Honeybul, K. M. Ho & C. R. P. Lind - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):727-730.
    Decompressive craniectomy is a technically straightforward procedure whereby a large section of the cranium is temporarily removed in cases where the intracranial pressure is dangerously high. While its use has been described for a number of conditions, it is increasingly used in the context of severe head injury. As the use of the procedure increases, a significant number of patients may survive a severe head injury who otherwise would have died. Unfortunately some of these patients will be left severely disabled; (...)
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  3.  40
    Ethical considerations for performing decompressive craniectomy as a life-saving intervention for severe traumatic brain injury.Stephen Honeybul, Grant Gillett, Kwok Ho & Christopher Lind - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):657-661.
    In all fields of clinical medicine, there is an increasing awareness that outcome must be assessed in terms of quality of life and cost effectiveness, rather than merely length of survival. This is especially the case when considering decompressive craniectomy for severe traumatic brain injury. The procedure itself is technically straightforward and involves temporarily removing a large section of the skull vault in order to provide extra space into which the injured brain can expand. A number of studies have demonstrated (...)
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  4.  23
    Long-term survival with unfavourable outcome: a qualitative and ethical analysis.Stephen Honeybul, Grant R. Gillett, Kwok M. Ho, Courtney Janzen & Kate Kruger - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (12):963-969.
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  5. Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.Stephen Honeybul & Albert Chui - 2020 - In Ethics in neurosurgical practice. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
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  6. Ethics in neurosurgical practice.Stephen Honeybul (ed.) - 2020 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    The field of modern day bioethics is relatively young and continues to constantly evolve in parallel with the ever increasingly complex nature of contemporary medical practice. These advances present clinicians with an array of therapeutic options that would have not seemed possible only a generation ago. Given these medical advances and the expansion of the academic and medicolegal field of bioethics, one would have thought that clinical decision making would have become easier. However paradoxically this has not proved to be (...)
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  7. Malignant" middle cerebral artery infarction.Stephen Honeybul, Volker Puetz & Lars-Peder Pallesen - 2020 - In Ethics in neurosurgical practice. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
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  8. Severe traumatic brain injury.Stephen Honeybul, Kwok Ho & Grant Gillett - 2020 - In Ethics in neurosurgical practice. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
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  9. The aging surgeon.Stephen Honeybul & Gene Bolles - 2020 - In Ethics in neurosurgical practice. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
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  10.  17
    The influence of clinical evidence on surgical practice.S. Honeybul & K. M. Ho - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):825-828.
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  11. Live televised surgery.Eiichi Ishikawa, Nobuyuki Sakai & Stephen Honeybul - 2020 - In Stephen Honeybul (ed.), Ethics in neurosurgical practice. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
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  12.  32
    Traumatic Brain Injury: An Objective Model of Consent. [REVIEW]S. Honeybul, K. M. Ho & G. R. Gillett - 2013 - Neuroethics 7 (1):11-18.
    The aim of this paper was to explore the issue of consent when considering the use of a life saving but not necessarily restorative surgical intervention for severe traumatic brain injury. A previous study has investigated the issue amongst 500 healthcare workers by using a two-part structured interview to assess opinion regarding decompressive craniectomy for three patients with varying injury severity. A visual analogue scale was used to assess the strengths of their opinions both before and after being shown objective (...)
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