Results for 'S. H. Aristotle'

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  1. Poetics: With the Tractatus Coislinianus, Reconstruction of Poetics Ii, and the Fragments of the on Poets.S. H. Aristotle & Butcher - 1932 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Richard Janko's acclaimed translation of Aristotle's _Poetics_ is accompanied by the most comprehensive commentary available in English that does not presume knowledge of the original Greek. Two other unique features are Janko's translations with notes of both the _Tractatus Coislinianus_, which is argued to be a summary of the lost second book of the Poetics, and fragments of Aristotle’s dialogue On Poets, including recently discovered texts about catharsis, which appear in English for the first time.
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  2. Aristotle's Theory of Poetry and Fine Art with a Critical Text and Translation of the Poetics.S. H. Butcher - 1895 - Dover Publications.
  3.  44
    The Politics of Aristotle[REVIEW]H. W. S. - 1949 - Journal of Philosophy 46 (24):798-799.
  4.  73
    Thought and Touch: A Note on Aristotle's "De Anima".S. H. Rosen - 1961 - Phronesis 6 (2):127 - 137.
  5.  30
    Politics.H. Aristotle & Rackham - 1944 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Edited by H. Rackham.
    An English language translation accompanies the original Greek text of Aristotle's book about the nature of the state, constitutions, revolutions, democracy, and oligarchy.
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  6.  14
    Averroes’ Three Short Commentaries on Aristotle’s "Topics," "Rhetoric," and "Poetics.". [REVIEW]H. S. - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 33 (3):616-618.
    This volume contains a critical edition and annotated translation of three previously unpublished and virtually neglected commentaries of Averroes on Aristotle. The edition is based on the two extant Judaeo-Arabic MSS which were collated with the thirteenth-century Hebrew translation of Jacobben Makhir and the sixteenth-century Latin translation. In addition, there is an introduction that includes a discussion of the teaching of the text and indices of names and titles and technical terms. The latter index also functions as an English-Arabic (...)
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  7.  54
    The metaphysics.Aristotle & H. Lawson-Tancred - 1991 - Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Books. Edited by John H. McMahon.
    Book synopsis: Aristotle's probing inquiry into some of the fundamental problems of philosophy, The Metaphysics is one of the classical Greek foundation-stones of western thought, translated from the with an introduction by Hugh Lawson-Tancred in Penguin Classics. The Metaphysics presents Aristotle's mature rejection of both the Platonic theory that what we perceive is just a pale reflection of reality and the hard-headed view that all processes are ultimately material. He argued instead that the reality or substance of things (...)
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  8.  9
    Politics.Benjamin Aristotle, H. W. Carless Jowett & Davis - 1944 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Edited by H. Rackham.
    An English language translation accompanies the original Greek text of Aristotle's book about the nature of the state, constitutions, revolutions, democracy, and oligarchy.
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  9.  24
    De anima: on the soul.Aristotle & H. Lawson-Tancred - 1987 - Penguin Books.
    Book synopsis: For the Pre-Socratic philosophers the soul was the source of movement and sensation, while for Plato it was the seat of being, metaphysically distinct from the body that it was forced temporarily to inhabit. Plato's student Aristotle was determined to test the truth of both these beliefs against the emerging sciences of logic and biology. His examination of the huge variety of living organisms - the enormous range of their behaviour, their powers and their perceptual sophistication - (...)
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  10.  11
    Aristotle's Ethics: Writings From the Complete Works.H. G. Aristotle - 2014 - Princeton: Princeton University Press. Edited by Jonathan Barnes & Anthony Kenny.
    Eudemian ethics -- Nicomachean ethics -- Magna moralia -- Virtues and vices.
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  11. Aristotle's Ethics for English readers.H. Aristotle & Rackham - 1943 - Oxford,: Blackwell. Edited by H. Rackham.
  12.  13
    Aristotle's Politics: Writings From the Complete Works: Politics, Economics, Constitution of Athens.H. G. Aristotle - 2016 - Princeton University Press.
    Aristotle was the first philosopher in the Western tradition to address politics systematically and empirically, and he remains a central figure in political theory. This essential volume presents Aristotle's complete political writings—including his Politics, Economics, and Constitution of Athens—in their most authoritative translations, taken from the complete works that is universally recognized as the standard English edition. Edited by Jonathan Barnes, one of the world’s leading scholars of ancient philosophy, and with an illuminating introduction by Melissa Lane, an (...)
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  13. Aristotle's Treatise on Poetry.Daniel Aristotle, Thomas Twining, J. H. Payne & J. Parker - 1812 - Printed by Luke Hansard & Sons, Near Lincoln's-Inn Fields: And Sold by T.Cadell and W. Davies, in the Strand; Payne, Pall-Mall; White, Cochrane, and Co. Fleet Street; Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster Row; Deighton, Cambridge; and Parker,.
     
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  14.  74
    A Case For The Utility Of The Mathematical Intermediates.H. S. Arsen - 2012 - Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):200-223.
    Many have argued against the claim that Plato posited the mathematical objects that are the subjects of Metaphysics M and N. This paper shifts the burden of proof onto these objectors to show that Plato did not posit these entities. It does so by making two claims: first, that Plato should posit the mathematical Intermediates because Forms and physical objects are ill suited in comparison to Intermediates to serve as the objects of mathematics; second, that their utility, combined with (...)’s commentary on Plato’s posit of Intermediates, provides good reason to conclude that Plato did posit them. (shrink)
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  15.  46
    Aristotle's Immaterial Mover and the Problem of Location in "Physics" VIII.H. S. Lang - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (2):321 - 335.
    IN Physics VIII, 10, Aristotle seems to commit a serious mistake: just before concluding that the first mover required by all motion everywhere remains invariable and without parts or magnitude, Aristotle apparently locates this mover on the circumference of the cosmos.
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  16.  44
    Aristotle on Nature: A Study in the Relativity of Concepts and Procedures of Analysis.H. S. Thayer - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (4):725 - 744.
    A fundamental and familiar feature of Aristotle’s natural philosophy is his use of the concept of physis as an explanatory principle of the development and growth of certain kinds of things. Natural things are those that possess within them an original principle of continuous movement towards some completion. Nature is thus said to belong among the causes which are for the sake of something or are purposeful. The concept is crucial, Aristotle argues, if one is to be able (...)
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  17.  51
    Aristotle on the Meaning of Science.H. S. Thayer - 1979 - Philosophical Inquiry 1 (2):87-104.
  18.  9
    On ‘the one’ in Philolaus, fragment 7.H. S. Schibli - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (1):114-130.
    Presocratic philosophy, for all its diverse features, is united by the quest to understand the origin and nature of the world. The approach of the Pythagoreans to this quest is governed by their belief, probably based on studies of the numerical relations in musical harmony, that number or numerical structure plays a key role for explaining the world-order, the cosmos. It remains questionable to what extent the Pythagoreans, by positing number as an all-powerful explanatory concept, broke free from Presocratic ideas (...)
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  19.  24
    On 'the one' in Philolaus, fragment 7.H. S. Schibli - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (01):114-.
    Presocratic philosophy, for all its diverse features, is united by the quest to understand the origin and nature of the world. The approach of the Pythagoreans to this quest is governed by their belief, probably based on studies of the numerical relations in musical harmony, that number or numerical structure plays a key role for explaining the world-order, the cosmos. It remains questionable to what extent the Pythagoreans, by positing number as an all-powerful explanatory concept, broke free from Presocratic ideas (...)
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  20.  29
    Plato on the Morality of Imagination.H. S. Thayer - 1977 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (4):594 - 618.
    That the arts can be deceptive, that poetry and painting can be sources of moral and intellectual error, is a criticism made long before Plato. We delight in these works of imitation, they fascinate and please us, as Aristotle remarks. But a certain danger lurks in this delight; "the devil hath power to assume a pleasing shape," as Hamlet warns. The great Gorgias commenting on the arts shows how subtle that devil could be.
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  21.  50
    Hume and Barker on the Logic of Design.H. S. Harris - 1983 - Hume Studies 9 (1):19-24.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:19. HUME AND BARKER ON THE LOGIC OF DESIGN I find myself in complete agreement with what I take to be the main thesis of Stephen Barker's paper. It is certainly a mistake to concentrate our attention on the negative critique which Hume directed at the modes of argument of his rationalist predecessors and contemporaries and directed even more at the mode of certain conviction with which they presented (...)
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  22.  26
    Hegel's Critique of Aristotle's Philosophy of Mind. By Frederick G. Weiss. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1969, pp. xxviii, 57. Guilders 10.80. [REVIEW]H. S. Harris - 1970 - Dialogue 9 (2):251-252.
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  23.  21
    Frederick G. Weiss, Hegel's Critique of Aristotle's Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW]H. S. Harris - 1970 - Dialogue 9 (2):251-252.
  24.  27
    Averroes’ Three Short Commentaries on Aristotle’s "Topics," "Rhetoric," and "Poetics.". [REVIEW]S. H. - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 33 (3):616-618.
    This volume contains a critical edition and annotated translation of three previously unpublished and virtually neglected commentaries of Averroes on Aristotle. The edition is based on the two extant Judaeo-Arabic MSS which were collated with the thirteenth-century Hebrew translation of Jacobben Makhir and the sixteenth-century Latin translation. In addition, there is an introduction that includes a discussion of the teaching of the text and indices of names and titles and technical terms. The latter index also functions as an English-Arabic (...)
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  25.  37
    The Politics of Aristotle[REVIEW]W. S. H. - 1949 - Journal of Philosophy 46 (24):798-799.
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  26. The Meaning of ἀγαθόν In the Ethics of Aristotle.H. A. Prichard - 2002 - In H. A. Prichard (ed.), Moral writings. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Endeavours to specify what Aristotle means by αγαθον. In some contexts, this term seems to mean simply ‘that being desired’ or a person's ultimate or non‐ultimate end or aim. In other contexts, αγαθον takes on a normative quality. For his statements to have content, argues Prichard, Aristotle must hold that when we pursue something of a certain kind, such as an honour, we pursue it as a good. Prichard argues that by αγαθον Aristotle actually means ‘conducive to (...)
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  27.  4
    Philosophical Classics, Vol. I: Thales to Ockham; Vol. II: Bacon to Kant. [REVIEW]O. H. S. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (2):392-392.
    This is a very useful collection of important, standard, primary sources. Two-thirds of volume one is taken up with Plato and Aristotle with the rest of the volume evenly divided among the Presocratics, Hellenistic philosophers and Medieval philosophers. Four of the Platonic dialogues are complete. Second edition changes in the first volume include: changes in translators and new entries. In both volumes Kaufmann's prefaces are very brief and mainly biographical. He consistently ties in information about each thinker's contemporaries. The (...)
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  28.  26
    The Concept of Order. [REVIEW]O. H. S. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):363-363.
    In 1963-1964 the Carnegie Corporation awarded Grinnell College a grant to support new interdisciplinary programs. One of these was the "Interdisciplinary Seminar on Order." Scholars came from all over the country to lead discussions and read papers on some aspect of order as it related to their field. Various philosophers, historians, political scientists, psychologists, and people in religion, philosophy, and literature all took part. Philosophers show up under several of the book's headings. Paul Weiss has a short paper on some (...)
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  29.  9
    Philosophical Medical Ethics: Its Nature and Significance: Proceedings of the Third Trans-Disciplinary Symposium on Philosophy and Medicine Held at Farmington, Connecticut, December 11–13, 1975.S. F. Spicker & H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr - 2011 - Springer.
    in a scientific way, and takes the patient and his family into his confidence. Thus he learns something from the sufferer, and at the same time instructs the invalid to the best of his power. He does not give his prescriptions until he has won the patient's support, and when he has done so, he steadilY aims at producing complete restoration to health by persuading the sufferer in to compliance (Laws 4. 720 b-e, [28]). This passage shows the perennial nature (...)
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  30.  10
    A Short Account of Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]O. H. S. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (3):575-576.
    Parker obviously has a warm fondness and a deep empathetic understanding of this period of history, and they are offered to the reader in every carefully worked sentence. In a narrative style that presents the human dimension as well as the central ideas of the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, Parker imaginatively reconstructs the phenomenological, empirical, and the homely rationale for their theories. He depicts the Presocratics as organized around the question "What is the universe made of?" and Socrates (...)
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  31. Ethics as an inexact science: Aristotle's ambitions for moral theory'.Terence H. Irwin - 2000 - In Brad Hooker & Margaret Olivia Little (eds.), Moral particularism. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 100--29.
     
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  32. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (367-323 BC).T. H. Irwin - 2003 - In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 56.
  33. Aristotle on the Nature and Politics of Medicine.Samuel H. Baker - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):441-449.
    According to Aristotle, the medical art aims at health, which is a virtue of the body, and does so in an unlimited way. Consequently, medicine does not determine the extent to which health should be pursued, and “mental health” falls under medicine only via pros hen predication. Because medicine is inherently oriented to its end, it produces health in accordance with its nature and disease contrary to its nature—even when disease is good for the patient. Aristotle’s politician understands (...)
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  34. Were Aristotle's Intentions in Writing the De Anima Forgotten in Late Antiquity?H. J. Blumenthal - 1997 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 8:143-157.
    L'A. esamina i commentari al De anima di Filopono, dello pseudo-Filopono e dello pseudo-Simplicio.
     
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  35. A Monistic Conclusion to Aristotle’s Ergon Argument: the Human Good as the Best Achievement of a Human.Samuel H. Baker - 2021 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 103 (3):373-403.
    Scholars have often thought that a monistic reading of Aristotle’s definition of the human good – in particular, one on which “best and most teleios virtue” refers to theoretical wisdom – cannot follow from the premises of the ergon argument. I explain how a monistic reading can follow from the premises, and I argue that this interpretation gives the correct rationale for Aristotle’s definition. I then explain that even though the best and most teleios virtue must be a (...)
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  36.  64
    Geometrical Method and Aristotle's Account of First Principles.H. D. P. Lee - 1935 - Classical Quarterly 29 (02):113-.
    The object of this paper is to show the predominance of the influence of geometrical ideas in Aristotle's account of first principles in the Posterior Analytics— to show that his analysis of first principles is in its essentials an analysis of the first principles of geometry as he conceived them. My proof of this falls into two parts. I. A consideration of the parallel between Aristotle's and Euclid's account of first principles. II. A comparison between the general movement (...)
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  37.  24
    Aristotle's Metaphysics.Pamela M. Huby & H. G. Apostle - 1966 - Indiana University Press.
  38.  7
    Life's ultimate questions: an introduction to philosophy.Ronald H. Nash - 1999 - Grand Rapids: Zonderva.
    Life's Ultimate Questions is unique among introductory philosophy textbooks. By synthesizing three distinct approaches—topical, historical, and worldview/conceptual systems—it affords students a breadth and depth of perspective previously unavailable in standard introductory texts. Part One, Six Conceptual Systems, explores the philosophies of: naturalism, Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Augustine, and Aquinas. Part Two, Important Problems in Philosophy, sheds light on: The Law of Noncontradiction, Possible Words, Epistemology I: Whatever Happened to Truth?, Epistemology II: A Tale of Two Systems, Epistemology III: Reformed Epistemology, (...)
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  39.  12
    Alexander of Aphrodisias in the later Greek commentaries on Aristotle’s De Anima.H. J. Blumenthal - 1985 - In Vivian Nutton, Jutta Kolesh, H. J. Lulofs & Jürgen Wiesner (eds.), Kommentierung, Überlieferung, Nachleben. De Gruyter. pp. 90-106.
  40. The Concept of Ergon: Towards An Achievement Interpretation of Aristotle's 'Function Argument'.Samuel H. Baker - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 48:227-266.
    In Nicomachean Ethics 1. 7, Aristotle gives a definition of the human good, and he does so by means of the “ ergon argument.” I clear the way for a new interpretation of this argument by arguing that Aristotle does not think that the ergon of something is always the proper activity of that thing. Though he has a single concept of an ergon, Aristotle identifies the ergon of an X as an activity in some cases but (...)
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  41.  86
    Methodological superiority of Aristotle over euclid.H. G. Apostle - 1958 - Philosophy of Science 25 (2):131-134.
    If we were to name the two greatest mathematicians of antiquity, we would probably choose Archimedes and Euclid. The first excelled in research, the second in synthesis or system. The synthesis or system is closely associated with the theory or philosophy of that subject; and Euclid's Elements, which has been characterized as “one of the noblest monuments of antiquity”, is the best concrete instance of the theory of mathematics according to the ancient Greeks. Now Aristotle had a theory of (...)
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  42.  12
    Geometrical Method and Aristotle's Account of First Principles.H. D. P. Lee - 1935 - Classical Quarterly 29 (2):113-124.
    The object of this paper is to show the predominance of the influence of geometrical ideas in Aristotle's account of first principles in the Posterior Analytics— to show that his analysis of first principles is in its essentials an analysis of the first principles of geometry as he conceived them. My proof of this falls into two parts. I. A consideration of the parallel between Aristotle's and Euclid's account of first principles. II. A comparison between the general movement (...)
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  43.  20
    Happiness in Premodern Judaism: Virtue, Knowledge, and Well-Being (review).Daniel H. Frank - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (3):338-339.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Happiness in Premodern Judaism: Virtue, Knowledge, and Well-BeingDaniel H. FrankHava Tirosh-Samuelson. Happiness in Premodern Judaism: Virtue, Knowledge, and Well-Being. Cincinnati: Hebrew Union College Press, 2003. Pp. xi + 596. Cloth, $50.00.Franz Rosenzweig tried hard to convince the neoKantian Hermann Cohen of the merits of Zionism and the normalization it would bring to Jews and Jewish life. His attempt met with this response from Cohen: "Oho! So the gang (...)
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  44.  45
    Aristotle’s Ethical Intuitionism.Bernard H. Baumrin - 1968 - New Scholasticism 42 (1):1-17.
  45.  13
    European and American Philosophers.John Marenbon, Douglas Kellner, Richard D. Parry, Gregory Schufreider, Ralph McInerny, Andrea Nye, R. M. Dancy, Vernon J. Bourke, A. A. Long, James F. Harris, Thomas Oberdan, Paul S. MacDonald, Véronique M. Fóti, F. Rosen, James Dye, Pete A. Y. Gunter, Lisa J. Downing, W. J. Mander, Peter Simons, Maurice Friedman, Robert C. Solomon, Nigel Love, Mary Pickering, Andrew Reck, Simon J. Evnine, Iakovos Vasiliou, John C. Coker, Georges Dicker, James Gouinlock, Paul J. Welty, Gianluigi Oliveri, Jack Zupko, Tom Rockmore, Wayne M. Martin, Ladelle McWhorter, Hans-Johann Glock, Georgia Warnke, John Haldane, Joseph S. Ullian, Steven Rieber, David Ingram, Nick Fotion, George Rainbolt, Thomas Sheehan, Gerald J. Massey, Barbara D. Massey, David E. Cooper, David Gauthier, James M. Humber, J. N. Mohanty, Michael H. Dearmey, Oswald O. Schrag, Ralf Meerbote, George J. Stack, John P. Burgess, Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Nicholas Jolley, Adriaan T. Peperzak, E. J. Lowe, William D. Richardson, Stephen Mulhall & C. - 2017 - In Robert L. Arrington (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophers. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 109–557.
    Peter Abelard (1079–1142 ce) was the most wide‐ranging philosopher of the twelfth century. He quickly established himself as a leading teacher of logic in and near Paris shortly after 1100. After his affair with Heloise, and his subsequent castration, Abelard became a monk, but he returned to teaching in the Paris schools until 1140, when his work was condemned by a Church Council at Sens. His logical writings were based around discussion of the “Old Logic”: Porphyry's Isagoge, aristotle'S Categories (...)
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  46. Nicomachean Revision in the Common Books: the Case of NE VI (≈EE V) 2.Samuel H. Baker - 2024 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:193-236.
    We have good reason to believe that Nicomachean Ethics VI. 2 is a Nicomachean revision of an originally Eudemian text. Aristotle seems to have inserted lines 1139a31-b11 by means of a marginal note, which the first editor then mistakenly added in the wrong place, and I propose that we move these lines so that they follow the word κοινωνεῖν at 1139a20. The suggested note appears to be Nicomachean for several reasons but most importantly because it contains a desire-based account (...)
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  47.  29
    Confucius and Aristotle on friendship: A comparative study.H. E. Yuanguo - 2007 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):291-307.
    Before and during the times of Confucius and Aristotle, the concept of friendship had very different implications. This paper compares Confucius’ with Aristotle’s thoughts on friendship from two perspectives: xin 信 and le 乐. The Analects emphasizes the xin as the basis of friendship. Aristotle holds that there are three kinds of friends and corresponding to them are three types of friendship. In the friendship for the sake of pleasure, there is no xin; in the legal form (...)
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  48. Mental Health as Moral Virtue.Terence H. Irwin - 2013 - In K. W. M. Fulford, Martin Davies, Richard Gipps, George Graham, John Sadler, Giovanni Stanghellini & Tim Thornton (eds.), The Oxford handbook of philosophy and psychiatry. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics identify mental health with moral virtue. Are they right? We might be inclined to disagree with him if we believe that mental health is good for the agent, whereas virtues of character are good for other people. These philosophers answer that the mental features of the virtues of character are also features of a person's good. Still, their demands for psychic unity and cohesion might appear to exaggerate reasonable conditions on mental health. In the (...)
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  49.  30
    Aristotle's School.H. B. Gottschalk - 1976 - The Classical Review 26 (01):70-.
  50.  21
    Aristotle's Theory of ΤΟΠΟΣ.H. R. King - 1950 - Classical Quarterly 44 (1-2):76-.
    Diogenes Laertius relates the tale that Aristotle, upon being reproached for giving alms to a debased fellow, replied, ‘It was not his character, but the man, that I pitied.’ Some such reply is equally apt in apology for a paper paying homage to an idea long discredited in the philosophical world, Aristotle's theory of Place. I have been moved, not indeed by the apparent character of Aristotle's theory, for that is easily reproached, but by what has proved (...)
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