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  1.  40
    The Quality of Business Ethics Journals: An Assessment Based on Application.Holly H. Brower, Bruce R. Lewis & S. Douglas Beets - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (2):188-213.
    With growth in the quantity of business ethics journals in recent years, assessments of journal quality are helpful to ethics researchers and administrators, as researchers consider available publication venues, and administrators consider the value of faculty research. The few published evaluations of business ethics journals have predominantly utilized two methods of journal quality determination: citation analysis and surveys of active researchers. This study employs a novel method to assess business ethics journals: 83 Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business business (...)
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  2.  45
    Understanding the Demand-Side Issues of International Corruption.S. Douglas Beets - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (1):65-81.
    In global business, business organizations and their representatives frequently encounter corruption and may be the perpetrators, victims, or simply participants in such acts. While international corruption has existed in multiple forms for several years, many individuals, companies, nations, and international organizations are currently attempting to reduce or eliminate corrupt acts because of their harmful effects on local economies and the quality of life of citizens. Several of these corruption curtailment efforts have been directed toward the supply-side of corruption, i.e., those (...)
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  3.  17
    An Absence of Transparency: The Charitable and Political Contributions of US Corporations.S. Douglas Beets & Mary G. Beets - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (4):1101-1113.
    Although stockholders may benefit from information regarding the frequently substantial charitable and political contributions of the corporations they own, US corporations are typically not required to disclose any information about such payments in annual financial statements or information submitted periodically to regulatory agencies. This lack of transparency is confounded by disclosure requirements of private foundations, which a corporation may choose to establish for the purposes of administering charitable giving for the corporation. The resulting disclosure fog engendered by extant regulations may (...)
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  4.  5
    An Academic Publisher’s Response to Plagiarism.Bruce Lewis, Jonathan Duchac & S. Douglas Beets - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):489-506.
    Plagiarism strikes at the heart of academe, eroding the fundamental value of academic research. Recent evidence suggests that acts of plagiarism and awareness of these acts are on the rise in academia. To address this issue, a vein of research has emerged in recent years exploring plagiarism as an area of academic inquiry. In this new academic subject, case studies and analysis have been one of the most influential methodologies employed. Case studies provide a venue where acts of plagiarism can (...)
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  5. BB&T, Atlas Shrugged, and the Ethics of Corporation Influence on College Curricula.S. Douglas Beets - 2015 - Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (4):311-344.
    Tuition and government funding does not adequately support the mission of many colleges and universities, and increasingly, corporations are responding to this need by making payments to institutions of higher learning with significant contracted expectations, including influence of the curriculum and content of college courses. One large, public banking corporation, BB&T, has funded grants to more than 60 colleges and universities in the United States to address what the corporation refers to as the “moral foundations of capitalism.” These grants vary (...)
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  6.  16
    BB&T, Atlas Shrugged.S. Douglas Beets - 2015 - Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (4):311-344.
    Tuition and government funding does not adequately support the mission of many colleges and universities, and increasingly, corporations are responding to this need by making payments to institutions of higher learning with significant contracted expectations, including influence of the curriculum and content of college courses. One large, public banking corporation, BB&T, has funded grants to more than 60 colleges and universities in the United States to address what the corporation refers to as the “moral foundations of capitalism.” These grants vary (...)
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  7.  53
    Critical Events in the Ethics of U.S. Corporation History.S. Douglas Beets - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):193-219.
    The history of corporations in the United States (U.S.) is much older than the country, as it must be understood in the context of the history of peoples of Europe who eventually dominated the North American continent in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. These European settlers came, in part, to achieve economic prosperity for themselves and, in many cases, for early forerunners of the modern corporation. These business organizations had predecessors in Europe millennia earlier as ancient Romans had developed a (...)
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  8.  15
    Business ethics in the broiler industry.S. Douglas Beets - 2019 - Business and Society Review 124 (2):239-260.
    The chicken meat, or broiler, business in the United States is a vertically integrated industry in which integrator corporations control all aspects of the business. Primarily through a series of business acquisitions, an industry duopoly has evolved. The two dominant integrator corporations, Pilgrim's Pride and Tyson Foods, are profitable, and their officers and stockholders benefit from the corporations’ financial success. The multitude of local growers who nurture the chickens to maturity for the integrators, however, benefit minimally from the financial success (...)
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  9.  48
    Personal Morals and Professional Ethics.S. Douglas Beets - 1991 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 10 (2):63-84.
  10.  7
    The Charles Koch Foundation and Contracted Universities: Evidence from Disclosed Agreements.S. Douglas Beets - 2019 - Journal of Academic Ethics 17 (3):219-243.
    Since 2000, the Charles Koch Foundation has paid hundreds of millions of dollars to US universities in contractual exchanges. Many of these contracts have dictated the establishment or support of a CKF-affiliated center or institute on campus and university employment of CKF-affiliated tenured or tenure-track professors who agree to promote the CKF philosophy of minimal government regulation of business. While many in the academic community are opposed to these contracts because of concerns about academic freedom and the transfer of university (...)
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  11.  53
    The effectiveness of a complaint-based ethics enforcement system: Evidence from the accounting profession. [REVIEW]S. Douglas Beets & Larry N. Killough - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (2):115 - 126.
    Many professions, in order to enforce their ethics codes, rely on a complaint-based system, whereby persons who observe or discover ethics violations may file a complaint with an authoritative body. The authors assume that this type of system may encourage ethical behavior when practitioners believe that a punishment is likely to result from a failure to adhere to the rules. This perceived likelihood of punishment has three components: detection risk, reporting risk, and sanction risk. A survey of potential violation witnesses (...)
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