Results for 'S. C. A.'

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  1.  32
    Berkeley's Analysis of Perception[REVIEW]A. S. C. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):371-371.
    "One basic and underlying assumption of this investigation will be that there is a distinct continuity and development in Berkeley's thought which can be traced through (...)all of his reflective analyses of the problem of perception." The essay argues for Berkeley's theory of perception as a "prototype of the phenomenalists." It argues also for Berkeley's incorporation of elements from the representative theory of perception. Of special interest is the treatment of Berkeley's doctrine of "suggestion" and its connection with the role of imagination in the perception of physical objects. The linguistic aspect of Berkeley's work is minimized. Berkeley's theory of notions receives only a passing reference. The last third of the book is a clear and useful discussion of Berkeley and contemporary phenomenalism. It is suggested, though not shown, that Berkeley has affinity with contemporary phenomenology of perception.--A. S. C. (shrink)
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  2.  21
    A Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Student of Law of the Common Laws of England[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):354-354.
    This is a critical edition of the work published in 1681, two years after Hobbes' death. The dialogue contains mature reflections of Hobbes on the doctrine of (...)
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  3.  10
    Bradley's Metaphysics and the Self[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):373-373.
    An able and clear defense of Bradley's principal theses and the underlying conception of metaphysical enterprise. "This is a book about a metaphysician, about metaphysics, and, (...)most importantly, it attempts to develop elements of a metaphysical position long the lines of what is called Absolute Idealism." The Introduction takes up the Verificationists [[sic]] argument and two recent accounts of metaphysics. Part I devotes ten Chapters to the elucidation and defense of Bradley's conception of reality. It culminates in examining three alternative accounts of "Real". Part II considers "the major philosophical theories of the self in order to defend Bradley's Theory of the self within his metaphysical scheme."--A. S. C. (shrink)
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  4. Childrens Rights: A Philosophical Study.C. A. Wringe - 1981 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1981, this book provides a detailed account of the emergence of the children's rights movement, and analyses the concept of a right. It (...)considers the justifications which may be sought when rights are claimed. Particular attention is given to the problem which arises when different rights are seen to be in conflict with each other or with other kinds of moral consideration. These arguments are then examined with regard to such special features of children as their incomplete but developing rationality and their material dependence on adults. (shrink)
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  5.  14
    An Anatomy of Values: Problems of Personal and Social Choice[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):352-352.
    A clearly written book that purports to analyze "the ends men pursue, and the ways in which these ends are ordered in some kind of system." The (...)
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  6. Pembroke College Cambridge: A Short History.S. C. Roberts (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    This short history of Pembroke College, Cambridge appeared in 1936, during a particularly successful period for the college in terms of both academic and sporting achievements. Pembroke (...)
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  7.  8
    Kleene S. C.. A Note on Recursive Functions. Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 42 , Pp. 544546.Alonzo Church - 1936 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 1 (3):119-119.
  8.  12
    Theocritus. Edited with a Translation and Commentary by A. S. F. Gow. 2 Voll. Pp. Lxxxiv + 257; 635, with 15 Pll. Cambridge University Press, 1950. 63s[REVIEW]C. A. Trypanis & A. S. F. Gow - 1952 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 72:135-136.
  9.  32
    Proceedings From the IV Brazilian Meeting on Research Integrity, Science and Publication Ethics : Goi'Nia, Brasil. 17-18 November 2016[REVIEW]A. S. C. Abreu, H. S. Selistre-de-Araujo, D. Guilhem, M. R. C. G. Novaes, N. R. A. Silva, M. Palácios, P. G. Camacho, M. Russo, A. Abreu, S. Cruz-Riascos, L. V. R. Rezende, A. C. Quintela, J. Leta, E. Damasio, H. H. Caiaffa Filho, R. M. Catarino, A. A. B. Almodóvar, A. P. Vicentini, B. C. Machado, M. M. Sorenson, J. R. Lapa E. Silva, A. Palma, R. M. V. R. Almeida, E. H. Watanabe, D. Foguel, S. M. R. Vasconcelos, C. A. Guimarães, A. Schtscherbyna, J. C. Amaral, H. G. Falcão, F. R. Mota, S. C. Bourguignon, R. Kant de Lima, S. Liskauskas, M. C. Cassimiro, J. Araújo, A. S. Carvalho, M. Patrão Neves, F. M. Litto, M. D. P. Silva, L. S. Gracioso, A. C. Furnival, P. M. Lourenço, V. Ronchi, M. M. M. Machado, R. Amaral, M. D. Ribeiro, R. Neves, V. C. Garbocci, M. Fontes-Domingues, P. Biancovilli, R. T. Souza, P. V. S. Souza, D. C. Machado, C. C. Santos, A. M. Gollner, H. S. Pinheiro, G. A. Fófano, A. A. P. Santa Rosa, C. H. Debenedito Silva, A. M. M. Soares, M. M. P. Diós-Borges, E. Duarte & Gar - 2017 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 2 (Suppl 1).
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  10.  25
    Corporate Social Responsibility Starts at University.Heidi S. C. A. MuijenHeidi - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):235-246.
    The author addresses the question of how to use value-learning processes to integrate corporate social responsibility (CSR) in organizations as an interesting challenge in (higher) education. (...)Two strategies have been proposed for the issue of CSR: a compliance strategy and a cultural change strategy (Karssing, 2001). This article focuses on the ethical and philosophical presuppositions of these different approaches. The incorporation of CSR in organizations cannot be accomplished by means of a compliance strategy only. Rather, it needs to be supplemented by a strategy aimed at stimulating a transformation process on the corporate culture level. The perspective of change through dialogue is proposed as a means of innovating the curriculum and the primary processes of student education. This organizational change perspective is demonstrated by describing how (ethical) reflective aspects are integrated in the curriculum of the Free University of Amsterdam. An additional case study on organizational value learning is presented to illustrate the thesis that CSR presupposes that university is an adequate context where life-long learning begins. (shrink)
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  11. EASTON, S. C. -Roger Bacon and His Search for a Universal Science[REVIEW]A. C. Crombie - 1954 - Mind 63:565.
     
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  12.  3
    What's Wrong with Moralism.C. A. J. Coady (ed.) - 2006 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This thought-provoking book examines exactly what people mean when they accuse others of beingmoralistic”. Written by an international team of philosophers Analyses what thevice (...)of moralism might be and contrasts this with a genuine concern for morality Contributors draw upon literary sources, philosophical theories and political theory Helps readers to appreciate the role that morality really plays in our judgements and decisions. (shrink)
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  13.  8
    The Shape of Athenian Law.S. C. Todd - 1995 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Unlike its predecessors, this systematic survey of the law of Athens is based on explicit discussion of how the subject might be studies, incorporating topics such as (...)
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  14.  58
    The Design Argument: Hume's Critique of Poor Reason: J. C. A. GASKIN.J. C. A. Gaskin - 1976 - Religious Studies 12 (3):331-345.
    In an article in Philosophy R. G. Swinburne set out to argue that none of Hume's formal objections to the design argumenthave any validity against (...)a carefully articulated version of the argument’ . This, he maintained, is largely because Hume's criticismsare bad criticisms of the argument in any form’ . The ensuing controversy between Swinburne and Olding 1 has focused upon the acceptable/unacceptable aspects of the dualism presupposed in Swinburne's defence of the design argument; upon whether any simplification is achieved by reducing scientific explanation to agent explanation; and upon the problems which arise from taking a man's acting upon his body as the analogy for understanding a disembodied agent acting upon matter. In this article I shall refer to the Swinburne-Olding controversy when appropriate but my main concern is to return to Swinburne's original article and argue, seriatim , that Hume's individual criticisms of the design argument are for the most part a great deal more powerful than Swinburne allowed. I shall contend that cumulatively they destroy the design argument as any sort of rational foundation for theistic belief. But first I shall indicate briefly the character of the argument together with one or two of the distinctions and refinements in terms of which it has been found helpful to carry on the discussion in recent years. (shrink)
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  15.  32
    The Concept of Expression: A Study in Philosophical Psychology and Aesthetics[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (3):571-571.
    A lucidly written and original contribution to the study of the concept of expression. "The aim has been to construct an analysis from the examination of typical (...)
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  16.  78
    Critical Notice.Review author[S.]: C. A. Mace - 1953 - Mind 62 (246):253-258.
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  17.  19
    In Defense of Practical Reason: A Study and An Application of Arthur Murphy's Theory[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (3):558-558.
    An account and development of Arthur Murphy's Theory of Practical Reason and its application to contemporary moral problems. Chapter II gives a schematic account of Murphy's (...) theory of normative discourse. Chapter III contrasts this theory with other theories and approaches. The author justly remarks that "Murphy's intent has been primarily to restore proper balance among considerations that play a role in practical discourse and to steer clear of the pitfalls which would impair or diminish the effectiveness of reason in human actions." Chapter IV deals with "the contemporary erosion of practical reason and critique of existentialistic [[sic]] ethics." Chapter V contains an interesting discussion of Murphy's conception of developing and dynamic self as responsible agent. It gives recognition to the moral self as basic condition that underlies the activity of practical justification. The final chapter undertakes practical applications of the theory expounded. The monograph is a good exposition and defense of Murphy's important contribution to contemporary moral philosophy.--A. S. C. (shrink)
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  18.  6
    S. C. Pepper's "Concept and Quality: A World Hypothesis". [REVIEW]A. S. Cua - 1969 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 29 (4):616.
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  19.  41
    The Mental Representation of Discourse in a Focussed Memory System: Implications for the Interpretation of Anaphoric Noun Phrases.S. C. Garrod & A. J. Sanford - 1982 - Journal of Semantics 1 (1):21-41.
    To a cognitive psychologist discourse comprehension poses a number of interesting problems both in terms of mental representation and mental operations. In this paper we suggest that (...)
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  20.  33
    Collingwood and Historical Testimony: C. A. J. Coady.C. A. J. Coady - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (194):409-424.
    Although there are many different philosophical hares that could be started by the use of the termhistorical factI am interested in pursuing one that is (...)
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  21. Idealism and Common Sense.C. A. McIntosh - 2021 - In Joshua Farris & Benedikt Paul Göcke (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Idealism and Immaterialism. pp. 496-505.
    The question I wish to explore is this: Does idealism conflict with common sense? Unfortunately, the answer I give may seem like a rather banal one: It (...)
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  22.  22
    Group DifferencesIndividual Differences.C. S. Bergeman & A. D. Seroczynski - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):546-548.
    Mealey's etiological distinction between primary and secondary sociopathy blurs the delineation between individual and group differences. She uses physiological evidence to support her claim of genetic (...)influences, neglecting variability within social classes, frequency of delinquent behavior in upper and middle classes (measured by self-report), and discontinuity of criminal behavior across the life span. Finally, Mealey's proposals for differential intervention fall short of a future agenda, which should tailor to individual needs, not social classes. (shrink)
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  23.  32
    Berkeley on the Unity of the Self: S. C. Brown.S. C. Brown - 1971 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 5:64-87.
    That the legacy of Berkeley's philosophy has been a largely sceptical one is perhaps rather surprising. For he himself took it as one of his objectives (...)to undermine scepticism. He roundly denied that there wereany principles more opposite to Scepticism than those we have laid down’. Yet Hume was to write of Berkeley thatmost of the writings of that very ingenious author form the best lessons of scepticism, Bayle not excepted’. And it has become something of a commonplace to say that Berkeley's philosophy is sceptical in direction, if not in intention. He is represented as a half-hearted sceptic, applying radical empiricist principles in his treatment of matter but baulking at their implications when he came to consider spirits. Hume is credited with being the more thoroughgoing of the two. Berkeley had denied the substantiality of extended things. Hume felt obliged, by parity of reasoning, to deny the substantiality of the self. On his account of the mind there isproperly no simplicity in it at one time, nor identity in different’. It is commonly supposed that Berkeley, in maintaining the quite contrary view that we know ourselves to be simple, undivided beings, showed a lack of rigour or consistency. (shrink)
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  24. Dialectics: A Controversy-Oriented Approach to the Theory of KnowledgePlausible Reasoning: An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Plausible Inference[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (2):368-368.
    These two small works are a good supplement to Reschers recent trilogy. Whereas the systems-theoretic approach is employed in Methodological Pragmatism in dealing with the problem (...) of the legitimation of claims to factual knowledge or cognitive rationality, Dialectics deals with the argumentation aspect of thesis-introduction rather than the logical aspect of thesis-derivation. Although some key notions such as the idea of burden of proof and presumption have been stated in the former work, what is offered here is a systematic discussion of a disputational model of inquiry. The principal aims are "to exhibit the sociocommunal roots of the foundations of rationality, to provide an instrument for the critique of scepticism implicit in the cognitive solipsism of the Cartesian approach, and to illuminate the communal and controversy-oriented aspects of rational argumentation and inquiryscientific inquiry in particular." Again, Rescher limits his discussion to "the probative mechanism in the factual domain." This book, if it were not for its price, should be a good supplement to a course in "informal" logic which focuses on argumentation rather than on mere evaluation of arguments. Plausible Reasoning provides the mechanism for evaluation of plausibility claims as distinct from probabilistic ones. The basic differences between these two types of claims are clearly discussed. "Plausibility is essentially a classificatory concept which ranks theses in terms of the standing and solidity of their cognitive basis. Plausibility grades theses by an external or extrinsic standard of the hierarchical nature of their supporting bases. It classifies propositions by the status of the evidential sources or validating principles that vouch for them. Probability weighs alternatives and evaluates theses by this relative contentual weight of the supporting considerations."—A.S.C. (shrink)
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  25. C.S. Peirce and the Problem of God.S. M. A. James O’Connell - 1958 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 8:24-45.
    Peirces doctrine of God has scarcely been studied at all. This is surprising because his own naturally religious temperament, his desire for philosophical completeness and the (...)influence of Kant, all led him to give an important place to theistic speculation in his philosophy. It is true that few parts of his philosophy reveal more than the fragmentary and unfinished nature of his thinking. This however does not take away from its importance both for the interpretation of his philosophy and for the evaluation of its contribution. In this paper I want to examine his doctrine of God mainly in order to discover and outline what views he held in the matter. Such examination is an essential preliminary to any consideration of the value of his theistic thinking. Moreover, an objective exposition is already the best beginning of evaluation. However it is impossible to undertake this kind of examination without a careful search into various corners of his writings and a meticulous and slightly laboured presentation of ones findings. But I think that the patience involved in such research has a rich reward. (shrink)
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  26.  41
    The Liberal Theory of Justice: A Critical Examination of the Principal Doctrines in a Theory of Justice by John Rawls[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (1):116-117.
    This book is a sustained criticism of John Rawlscomprehensive work on the theory of justice. While recognizing the significant contribution of Rawls to both ethics and (...)
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  27.  24
    Root Metaphor: The Live Thought of Stephen C. Pepper[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 36 (1):162-163.
    For scholars of American philosophy, this anthology of essays on S. C. Pepper's works on metaphysics, aesthetics, and value theory is especially a welcome one. Also (...)included is a reprint of a little known but valuable essay by Pepper entitled "Metaphor in Philosophy," which originally appeared in volume 3 of Phillip S. Wiener's Dictionary of the History of Ideas. In this essay, Pepper discusses his root metaphor theory in relation to Bacon and Kant, and some contemporary uses of the notion of paradigm, e.g., Wittgenstein and Kuhn. Lewis E. Hahn's "The Stephen C. Pepper Papers, 1903-1972" gives an informative account of six book-length unpublished manuscripts in the Pepper Archives at the Southern Illinois University. The rest of the essays concentrate on the various aspects of Pepper's works. A few deal with aesthetic theory and its application to critical practice. Of philosophical interests are papers by Elmer H. Duncan, David B. Richardson, Robert J. Yanal, Robert L. Armstrong, and Brian Caraher, and a short essay by Charles Hartshorne and a response by Joseph H. Monast. Duncan gives a just but critical account of the neglect of Pepper's Sources of Value, and a highly appreciative appraisal of Pepper's World Hypotheses. Caraher's careful essay on the conflicting root metaphors in Frege's theory of meaning offers interesting application of Pepper's conception of formism and contextualism to problems in Frege's philosophy. A variety of problems such as the root metaphor theory, descriptive definition and aesthetic experience are discussed. Efron's long introductory essay entitled "Pepper's Continuing Value" serves its purpose well in terms of indicating Pepper's influence in non-philosophical disciplines and the problems that arise in Pepper's value theory. What is missed is a sustained critical examination of Pepper's root metaphor theory, characterization of the various world hypotheses including Pepper's own selectivism, and its relation to ethical theory. The anthology however is useful in indicating the scope of Pepper's influence and the need to examine his contributions with reference to contemporary philosophical problems.--A.S.C. (shrink)
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  28.  25
    Root Metaphor: The Live Thought of Stephen C. Pepper.S. C. A. - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 36 (1):162-163.
    For scholars of American philosophy, this anthology of essays on S. C. Pepper's works on metaphysics, aesthetics, and value theory is especially a welcome one. Also (...)included is a reprint of a little known but valuable essay by Pepper entitled "Metaphor in Philosophy," which originally appeared in volume 3 of Phillip S. Wiener's Dictionary of the History of Ideas. In this essay, Pepper discusses his root metaphor theory in relation to Bacon and Kant, and some contemporary uses of the notion of paradigm, e.g., Wittgenstein and Kuhn. Lewis E. Hahn's "The Stephen C. Pepper Papers, 1903-1972" gives an informative account of six book-length unpublished manuscripts in the Pepper Archives at the Southern Illinois University. The rest of the essays concentrate on the various aspects of Pepper's works. A few deal with aesthetic theory and its application to critical practice. Of philosophical interests are papers by Elmer H. Duncan, David B. Richardson, Robert J. Yanal, Robert L. Armstrong, and Brian Caraher, and a short essay by Charles Hartshorne and a response by Joseph H. Monast. Duncan gives a just but critical account of the neglect of Pepper's Sources of Value, and a highly appreciative appraisal of Pepper's World Hypotheses. Caraher's careful essay on the conflicting root metaphors in Frege's theory of meaning offers interesting application of Pepper's conception of formism and contextualism to problems in Frege's philosophy. A variety of problems such as the root metaphor theory, descriptive definition and aesthetic experience are discussed. Efron's long introductory essay entitled "Pepper's Continuing Value" serves its purpose well in terms of indicating Pepper's influence in non-philosophical disciplines and the problems that arise in Pepper's value theory. What is missed is a sustained critical examination of Pepper's root metaphor theory, characterization of the various world hypotheses including Pepper's own selectivism, and its relation to ethical theory. The anthology however is useful in indicating the scope of Pepper's influence and the need to examine his contributions with reference to contemporary philosophical problems.--A.S.C. (shrink)
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  29.  20
    Bradley's Metaphysics and the Self.A. S. C. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):373-373.
    An able and clear defense of Bradley's principal theses and the underlying conception of metaphysical enterprise. "This is a book about a metaphysician, about metaphysics, and, (...)most importantly, it attempts to develop elements of a metaphysical position long the lines of what is called Absolute Idealism." The Introduction takes up the Verificationists [[sic]] argument and two recent accounts of metaphysics. Part I devotes ten Chapters to the elucidation and defense of Bradley's conception of reality. It culminates in examining three alternative accounts of "Real". Part II considers "the major philosophical theories of the self in order to defend Bradley's Theory of the self within his metaphysical scheme."--A. S. C. (shrink)
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  30.  4
    A Questão Do Retorno da Religião Na Obra de G. Vattimo.C. A. S. Baleeiro - 2013 - Páginas de Filosofía 5 (1):57-72.
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  31.  75
    God, Hume and Natural Belief: J. C. A. Gaskin.J. C. A. Gaskin - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (189):281-294.
    Hume's doctrine of natural belief allows that certain beliefs are justifiably held by all men without regard to the quality of the evidence which may be (...)produced in their favour. Examples are belief in an external world and belief in the veracity of our senses. According to R. J. Butler, Hume argues in the Dialogues that belief in God is of this sort. More recently John Hick has argued that for some people it is as natural to believe in God as to believe in an external world. I shall first inquire what Hume understands by reasonable belief and by natural belief. I shall then use the results of this investigation to argue, against Butler, that belief in God is not a natural belief; and against Hick, more briefly, that his thesis is not viable in as far as it depends upon Hume's doctrine of natural belief. These discussions are important to the philosophy of religion since by means of natural beliefs it could be urged that belief in God is something justifiable without reference to reason or evidence: a position which would be of immense value to the theist. (shrink)
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  32. The Isenberg Memorial Lectures 1965-1966[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (3):570-570.
    An excellent collection of lectures. The collection consists of the following: Carl C. Hempel, "On the Structure of Scientific Theories"; W. V. Quine, "Stimulus and Meaning"; Stuart (...)
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  33.  49
    Disclosures: J. C. A. GASKIN.J. C. A. Gaskin - 1973 - Religious Studies 9 (2):131-141.
    Dr Ian Ramsey has made considerable use of the worddisclosurein what he has to say about religion and in his attempts to give an account (...)
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  34.  18
    The Primacy of Practice: Essays Towards a Pragmatically Kantian Theory of Empirical Knowledge[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (4):812-813.
    These essays "develop in a more ample and emphatic form the pragmatic perspective of the idealistic position" defended in previous books. The basic question deals with validating (...)
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  35.  6
    Ethics Consultation in U.S. Hospitals: A National Follow-Up Study.Ellen Fox, Marion Danis, Anita J. Tarzian & Christopher C. Duke - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (4):5-18.
    A 19992000 national study of U.S. hospitals raised concerns about ethics consultation practices and catalyzed improvement efforts. To assess how practices have changed since 2000, we (...) administ... (shrink)
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  36.  80
    Can There Be a Private Language[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):412-413.
    This book is another work on the voluminous literature on the Private Language Argument. The author devotes his arguments solely to a refutation of "anti-private language (...)thesis" as it appears in the articles of N. Malcolm, J. D. Carney, and Newton Garver. Two arguments of the thesis are considered without ascription to Wittgensteins Philosophical Investigations. The first is the familiar "The Diary Keeper Argument" found in Wittgenstein : "The claim that the supposition that one could keep a record of a particular kind of sensation having no publicly observable behavioral or circumstantial indicators is unintelligible". Smeruds attack on this argument in part relies on Ayers paper "Can There Be a Private Language?" on the issue of recognition. For the issue on the criterion requirement, Smerud appealed to J. J. Thomsons paper "Private Languages" as a basis for argument. No note is taken of the criticism of the relevance of verification principle to the issue in D. Lockes Myself and Others. (shrink)
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  37.  21
    John Deweys Philosophy of Value[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):385-385.
    This is a comprehensive and appreciative account of Deweys philosophy of value. It succeeds in rectifying certain current misconceptions of Deweys aims and contributions to moral (...) philosophy, and in clearly presenting a coherent theory of value. Gouinlock begins his account by laying stress upon Deweys Experience and Nature as a key to Deweys thought. Chapter 1 is devoted to this task. It is held that "Dewey develops and articulates an inclusive philosophy by characterizing such things as art, science, and value with a common set of concepts denoting the generic traits of experience." There is also a discussion of Deweys philosophic method and the uses and abuses of experience. Chapter 2 deals with man and nature and Deweys critical response to bifurcation between mind and body, and the relation between individual and society. Chapter 3 begins with Nature and Value. Here one finds a good discussion of ends-in-view and values. A great stress is laid on Deweys use of metaphysical concepts in value analysis, in particular the needed stress on the inclusive unity of means and end. (shrink)
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  38.  47
    The Problem of the Self[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):356-356.
    This interesting and original essay deals with the sense in which the self is a problem, i.e. the sense in which the self poses a problem. (...)The central thesis is carefully argued: "that if there is a problem of the self, its solution is that self is a problem." Central to the thesis is the distinction between persons and selves. The concept of a person is in Heideggerian terms "ontic" in the sense that it does not arise from any theoretical concern. The concept of self is an "ontological" one. Chapter one argues for the assumption that "persons can be generally inconsistent" and for the distinction between computers and persons. In Chapter two, "the self" is defined as "the locus of the inconsistency." The remaining essays deal with the problems of identity, immortality, consciousness and the pivotal role of the self in philosophical controversy. The book is clearly written and its thesis is carefully supported by arguments. It is an original contribution to the philosophy of mind.--A. S. C. (shrink)
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  39. C.A.A.S. Rome-Athens Scholarship, Summer 1967.J. C. Williams - 1966 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 60 (1):4.
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  40. C.A.A.S. Rome-Athens Scholarship, Summer 1967.J. C. Williams - 1966 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 60 (2):49.
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  41.  34
    The Open Texture of Moral Concepts[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (2):352-353.
    This new addition to the series New Studies in Practical Philosophy edited by W. D. Hudson is a study of deontic moral judgment, in particular of moral (...)
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  42.  14
    Using Deep Learning to Predict Sentiments: Case Study in Tourism.C. A. Martín, J. M. Torres, R. M. Aguilar & S. Diaz - 2018 - Complexity 2018:1-9.
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  43.  21
    Without Guilt and Justice: From Decido-Phobia to Autonomy[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):395-396.
    This is a sustained attack on what the author termed "decido-phobia"—the fear of making fateful decisions. The book begins with an illuminating discussion of ten popular (...) strategies of decido-phobia. Of particular interest to moral philosophy is the attack on "moral rationalism" which "claims that purely rational procedures can show what one ought to do or what would constitute a just society". "Moral irrationalism" is also criticized for ignoring the relevance of reasons "when one is confronted with fateful decision". An ethics of autonomous men is proposed as an alternative to decido-phobia. This ethics involves four cardinal virtues of love, honesty, courage, and "humbition," the last a new coinage for "fusion of ambition and honesty." Both the concepts of justice and guilt are subjected to detailed criticism, since they constitute the chief obstacles on the road to autonomy. Unlike Kantian autonomy, Professor Kaufmann focuses on that which "consists of making with open eyes the decisions that give shape to ones life". There is no need of Kantian maxims or categorical imperative. Autonomy involves a new integrity or high standards of honesty which consist in a sort of lived intellectual honesty that is characteristic of a mind that is open to alternatives and spirit of questions. Alienation is regarded as a price of autonomy. A searching critique of current conceptions of alienation is given in Chapter 6. The author recommends a creative autonomous way of life. In his concluding words "guilt is mired in the past, as is retributive justice. Distributive justice is struck in the present, but by the time it has figured out how to cope with that, it is dated. We must move beyond guilt and justice. We must give up the pleasant notion that we can have all good things at once. What is best is not things at all but creative autonomy". This is an important theme and requires closer scrutiny of its central arguments and its suggested alternative ethics of creative autonomy.—A.S.C. (shrink)
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  44.  46
    John Dewey's Philosophy of Value.S. C. A. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):385-385.
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  45.  21
    Unselfishness: The Role of the Vicarious Affects in Moral Philosophy and Social Theory[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (2):357-358.
    This work belongs to what Adam Smith called "the theory of moral sentiments," in particular, it is concerned with the operation of sympathetic affections, which are termed (...)
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  46. Alfred North Whitehead an Anthology. Selected by F.S.C. Northrop and Mason W. Gross; Introductions and a Note on Whitehead's Terminology.Alfred North Whitehead, Mason Welch Gross & F. S. C. Northrop - 1953 - At the University Press.
     
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  47. From Bowne's Oldest Living Graduate.C. A. S. Dwight - 1953 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 34 (4):360.
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  48.  1
    Strangeness of Gods: Historical Perspectives on the Interpretation of Athenian Religion.S. C. Humphreys - 2004 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The Strangeness of Gods combines studies of changes in modern interpretations of Greek religion with studies of changes in Athenian ritual. The combination is necessary in order (...)
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  49.  36
    Opinions About Euthanasia and Advanced Dementia: a Qualitative Study Among Dutch Physicians and Members of the General Public.Pauline S. C. Kouwenhoven, Natasja J. H. Raijmakers, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Judith A. C. Rietjens, Donald G. Van Tol, Suzanne van de Vathorst, Nienke de Graeff, Heleen A. M. Weyers, Agnes van der Heide & Ghislaine J. M. W. van Thiel - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):7.
    The Dutch law states that a physician may perform euthanasia according to a written advance euthanasia directive when a patient is incompetent as long as all legal (...)
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  50.  11
    The Sources of Value[REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):364-364.
    A welcome reprint of a classical study in the theory of value first published in 1958. This, a comprehensive empirical study of values, culminates in the pivotal (...)
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