Results for 'S. A. Wylie'

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  1.  13
    Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Improves Reward-Based Decision-Learning in Parkinson's Disease.Nelleke C. van Wouwe, K. R. Ridderinkhof, W. P. M. van den Wildenberg, G. P. H. Band, A. Abisogun, W. J. Elias, R. Frysinger & S. A. Wylie - 2011 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.
  2.  12
    A Tribute to Charlie Chaplin: Induced Positive Affect Improves Reward-Based Decision-Learning in Parkinson’s Disease.K. Richard Ridderinkhof, Nelleke C. van Wouwe, Guido P. H. Band, Scott A. Wylie, Stefan Van der Stigchel, Pieter van Hees, Jessika Buitenweg, Irene van de Vijver & Wery P. M. van den Wildenberg - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
  3.  10
    Exposing an “Intangible” Cognitive Skill among Collegiate Football Players: Enhanced Interference Control.Scott A. Wylie, Theodore R. Bashore, Nelleke C. Van Wouwe, Emily J. Mason, Kevin D. John, Joseph S. Neimat & Brandon A. Ally - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  4.  46
    A more social epistemology: Decision vectors, epistemic fairness, and consensus in Solomon's social empiricism.Alison Wylie - 2008 - Perspectives on Science 16 (3):pp. 237-240.
    Solomon has made the case, in Social Empicism (2001) for socially naturalized analysis of the dynamics of scientific inquiry that takes seriously two critical insights: that scientific rationality is contingent, disunified, and socially emergent; and that scientific progress is often fostered by factors traditionally regarded as compromising sources of bias. While elements of this framework are widely shared, Solomon intends it to be more resolutely social, more thoroughly naturalizing, and more ambitiously normative than other contextualizing epistemologies currently on offer. Four (...)
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  5.  9
    Tibetan Civilization.Turrell V. Wylie, R. A. Stein & J. E. S. Driver - 1974 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 94 (4):521.
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  6. Review of Ian Dowbiggin, A concise history of euthanasia: Life, death, God, and medicine and Neal Nicol and Harry Wylie, Between the dying and the dead: Dr. Jack Kevorkian’s life and the battle to legalize euthanasia. [REVIEW]Sandra Woien - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):50-52.
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  7.  20
    The Enduring Influence of a Dangerous Narrative: How Scientists Can Mitigate the Frankenstein Myth.Peter Nagy, Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich & Ed Finn - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (2):279-292.
    Reflecting the dangers of irresponsible science and technology, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein quickly became a mythic story that still feels fresh and relevant in the twenty-first century. The unique framework of the Frankenstein myth has permeated the public discourse about science and knowledge, creating various misconceptions around and negative expectations for scientists and for scientific enterprises more generally. Using the Frankenstein myth as an imaginative tool, we interviewed twelve scientists to explore how this science narrative shapes their views and perceptions of (...)
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  8. What’s Feminist about Gender Archaeology?Alison Wylie - 2009 - In Que(e)rying Archaeology: Proceedings of the 36th Annual Chacmool Conference. University of Calgary Archaeology Association. pp. 282-289.
    I explore the relevance of feminist standpoint theory for understanding the development of gender research in archaeology. This is an approach to thinking about questions about gender in archaeology that I find fruitfully articulated in Jane Kelley and Marsha Hanen's analysis of the 1989 Chacmool abstracts. As standpoint theory has been reformulated in recent years it offers a strategy for understanding critically and constructively-what is (and is not) feminist about gender archaeology, and it suggests some guidelines for realizing "strong objectivity" (...)
     
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  9.  16
    Why Frankenstein is a Stigma Among Scientists.Peter Nagy, Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich & Ed Finn - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (4):1143-1159.
    As one of the best known science narratives about the consequences of creating life, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is an enduring tale that people know and understand with an almost instinctive familiarity. It has become a myth reflecting people’s ambivalent feelings about emerging science: they are curious about science, but they are also afraid of what science can do to them. In this essay, we argue that the Frankenstein myth has evolved into a stigma attached to scientists (...)
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  10. Editor’s pick: Hypatia.Alison Wylie - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):107-111.
    This article is a profile of the journal Hypatia for TPM: its founding, its mission, and central themes that figure in its close to 30 year publication history. When the first issues of Hypatia appeared in the mid-1980s they were the culmination, in the mid-1980s, of a decade-long process of visionary debate in the Society for Women in Philosophy (SWIP) about what form a journal of feminist philosophy should take, and extended discussion of how to make it a reality. The (...)
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  11. Epistemological Issues Raised by a Structuralist Archaeology.Alison Wylie - 1982 - In Ian Hodder (ed.), Symbolic and Structural Archaeology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 39-46.
    Insofar as the material residues of interest to archaeologists are cultural and, as such, have specifically symbolic significance, it is argued that archaeology must employ some form of structuralist analysis (i.e. as specifically concerned with this aspect of the material). Wylie examines the prevalent notion that such analysis is inevitably 'unscientific' because it deals with a dimension of material culture which is inaccessible of any direct, empirical investigation, and argues that this rests on an entrenched misconception of science; it (...)
     
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  12.  24
    Facing the Pariah of Science: The Frankenstein Myth as a Social and Ethical Reference for Scientists.Peter Nagy, Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich & Ed Finn - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (2):737-759.
    Since its first publication in 1818, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus has transcended genres and cultures to become a foundational myth about science and technology across a multitude of media forms and adaptations. Following in the footsteps of the brilliant yet troubled Victor Frankenstein, professionals and practitioners have been debating the scientific ethics of creating life for decades, never before have powerful tools for doing so been so widely available. This paper investigates how engaging with the Frankenstein myth (...)
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  13. Women in Philosophy: The Costs of Exclusion—Editor's Introduction.Alison Wylie - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (2):374-382.
    Philosophy has the dubious distinction of attracting and retaining proportionally fewer women than any other field in the humanities, indeed, fewer than in all but the most resolutely male-dominated of the sciences. This short article introduces a thematic cluster that brings together five short essays that probe the reasons for and the effects of these patterns of exclusion, not just of women but of diverse peoples of all kinds in Philosophy. It summarizes some of the demographic measures of exclusion that (...)
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  14.  17
    Setting a standard for a “silent” disease: defining osteoporosis in the 1980s and 1990s.Caitlin Donahue Wylie - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (4):376-385.
    Osteoporosis, a disease of bone loss associated with aging and estrogen loss, can be crippling but is ‘silent’ prior to bone fracture. Despite its disastrous health effects, high prevalence, and enormous associated health care costs, osteoporosis lacked a universally accepted definition until 1992. In the 1980s, the development of more accurate medical imaging technologies to measure bone density spurred the medical community’s need and demand for a common definition. The medical community tried, and failed, to resolve these differing definitions several (...)
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  15.  31
    Social constructionist arguments in Harding's science and social inequality.Alison Wylie - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 201-211.
    Harding’s aim in Science and Social Inequality is to integrate the insights generated by diverse critiques of conventional ideals of truth, value freedom, and unity in science, and to chart a way forward for the sciences and for science studies. Wylie assesses this synthesis as a genre of social constructionist argument and illustrates its implications for questions of epistemic warrant with reference to transformative research on gender-based discrimination in the workplace environment.
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  16.  20
    Commentary on 'Toward a Critical Archaeology' by Mark P. Leone, Parker B. Potter, and Paul A. Shackel.Alison Wylie - 1987 - Current Anthropology 28:247-298.
    Critical theory is construed in very broad terms in Leone, Potter, and Shackel's discussion. It is not restricted to the "critical theory" associated with the Frankfurt school or, latterly, with Habermas. It encom-passes any research program that adopts a critically self-conscious attitude toward its constituent presuppositions: as they describe it, "critical theory asks of any set of conclusions from what point of view they are constructed." To press for such reflexiveness is crucially important, but a number of important things drop (...)
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  17.  9
    Hutcheson and the "Classical" Theory of Slavery.Wylie Sypher - 1939 - Journal of Negro History 24 (3):263-280.
    Among the most characteristic effects of the onset of "romanticism" in the eighteenth century was the underinining of the "classical" ethics, based on rational selfdiscipline, by the "romantic" or humanitarian ethics, based on benevolism. A useful indication of the point at which this change in ethics occurred is the moment in which the institution of Negro slavery was attacked by benevolistic theory. As Trevelyan says, the anti-slavery movement was "the first successful propagandist agitation of the modern type" ; years before (...)
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  18.  13
    Rock, Bone, and Ruin: A Trace-centric Appreciation.Alison Wylie - 2019 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 11.
    I am on record as a fan of Rock, Bone, and Ruin, and I was pleased to discover that, in our paired cover blurbs, Martin Rudwick and I make essentially the same point: the great virtue of Rock, Bone, and Ruin is that Adrian Currie combines what you might describe as a jeweler’s-eye view, in his attention to the messy details of research practice in the historical sciences, with a cartographer’s breadth of vision that, as Rudwick puts it, leads him (...)
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  19. Epistemic Justice, Ignorance, and Procedural Objectivity—Editor's Introduction.Alison Wylie - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (2):233-235.
    The groundwork has long been laid, by feminist and critical race theorists, for recognizing that a robust social epistemology must be centrally concerned with questions of epistemic injustice; it must provide an account of how inequitable social relations inflect what counts as knowledge and who is recognized as a credible knower. The cluster of papers we present here came together serendipitously and represent a striking convergence of interest in exactly these issues. In their different ways, each contributor is concerned both (...)
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  20.  6
    Exposing an “Intangible” Cognitive Skill Among Collegiate Football Players: II. Enhanced Response Impulse Control.Theodore R. Bashore, Brandon Ally, Nelleke C. van Wouwe, Joseph S. Neimat, Wery P. M. van den Wildenberg & Scott A. Wylie - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  21.  12
    More on climbing fiber signals and their consequence(s).J. I. Simpson, D. R. W. Wylie & C. I. De Zeeuw - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):496-498.
    Several themes can be identified in the commentaries. The first is that the climbing fibers may have more than one function; the second is that the climbing fibers provide sensory rather than motor signals. We accept the possibility that climbing fibers may have more than one function consequence(s)’ in the title. Until we know more about the function of the inhibitory input to the inferior olive from the cerebellar nuclei, which are motor structures, we have to keep open the possibility (...)
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  22.  16
    Testing Scientific Theories, John Earman (Ed.): Explaining Confirmation Practice:Testing Scientific Theories John Earman.Alison Wylie - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (2):292-.
    The contributions to Testing Scientific Theories are unified by an in-terest in responding to criticisms directed by Glymour against existing models of confirmation—chiefly H-D and Bayesian schemas—and in assessing and correcting the "bootstrap" model of confirmation that he proposed as an alternative in Theory and Evidence (1980). As such, they provide a representative sample of objections to Glymour's model and of the wide range of new initiatives in thinking about scientific confirmation that it has influenced. The effect is a sense (...)
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  23. Making.Wylie Breckenridge - manuscript
    (Last modified 17th July 2007) I use Williamson’s results about necessary existents to argue that making something never involves bringing into existence something that does not exist. Rather, to make x is, for some kind k, to change x from being a non-k into being a k. I use this result to defend the position that the statue is identical to the lump of clay against one otherwise problematic appeal to Leibniz’s Law. I have presented this paper at the Cornell (...)
     
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  24. Why standpoint matters.Alison Wylie - 2003 - In Robert Figueroa & Sandra G. Harding (eds.), Science and Other Cultures: Issues in Philosophies of Science and Technology. Routledge. pp. 26--48.
    Feminist standpoint theory has been marginal to mainstream philosophical analyses of science–indeed, it has been marginal to science studies generally–and it has had an uneasy reception among feminist theorists. Critics of standpoint theory have attributed to it untenable foundationalist assumptions about the social identities that can underpin an epistemically salient standpoint, and implausible claims about the epistemic privilege that should be accorded to those who occupy subdominant social locations. I disentangle what I take to be the promising core of feminist (...)
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  25.  27
    Has Smith Solved the Moral Problem?Wylie Breckenridge & Daniel Blair Cohen - 2019 - Acta Analytica 34 (4):463-472.
    Michael Smith attempts to solve the moral problem by arguing that our moral beliefs constitute a rational constraint on our desires. In particular, Smith defends the ‘practicality requirement’, which says that rational agents who believe that an action is right must have some desire to perform that action. We clarify and examine Smith’s argument. We argue that, for the argument to be sound, it must make two crucial assumptions about the rational agent in question: that facts about her desires are (...)
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  26.  8
    Humanizing Science and Philosophy of Science: George Sarton, Contextualist Philosophies of Science, and the Indigenous/Science Project.Alison Wylie - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 52 (3):256-278.
    A century ago historian of science George Sarton argued that “science is our greatest treasure, but it needs to be humanized or it will do more harm than good”. The systematic cultivation of an “historical spirit,” a philosophical appreciation of the dynamic nature of scientific inquiry, and a recognition that science is irreducibly a “collective enterprise” was, on Sarton’s account, crucial to the humanizing mission he advocated. These elements of Sarton’s program are more relevant than ever as philosophers of science (...)
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  27.  13
    The plurality of assumptions about fossils and time.Caitlin Donahue Wylie - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):21.
    A research community must share assumptions, such as about accepted knowledge, appropriate research practices, and good evidence. However, community members also hold some divergent assumptions, which they—and we, as analysts of science—tend to overlook. Communities with different assumed values, knowledge, and goals must negotiate to achieve compromises that make their conflicting goals complementary. This negotiation guards against the extremes of each group’s desired outcomes, which, if achieved, would make other groups’ goals impossible. I argue that this diversity, as a form (...)
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  28.  41
    Overcoming the underdetermination of specimens.Caitlin Wylie - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (2):24.
    Philosophers of science are well aware that theories are underdetermined by data. But what about the data? Scientific data are selected and processed representations or pieces of nature. What is useless context and what is valuable specimen, as well as how specimens are processed for study, are not obvious or predetermined givens. Instead, they are decisions made by scientists and other research workers, such as technicians, that produce different outcomes for the data. Vertebrate fossils provide a revealing case of this (...)
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  29.  61
    Doesn't everybody jaywalk? On codified rules that are seldom followed and selectively punished.Jordan Wylie & Ana Gantman - 2023 - Cognition 231 (C):105323.
    Rules are meant to apply equally to all within their jurisdiction. However, some rules are frequently broken without consequence for most. These rules are only occasionally enforced, often at the discretion of a third-party observer. We propose that these rules—whose violations are frequent, and enforcement is rare—constitute a unique subclass of explicitly codified rules, which we call ‘phantom rules’ (e.g., proscribing jaywalking). Their apparent punishability is ambiguous and particularly susceptible to third-party motives. Across six experiments, (N = 1440) we validated (...)
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  30.  10
    Young Coleridge and the Philosophers of Nature.Ian Wylie - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    As a young man, Samuel Taylor Coleridge lived in an age of great social change. The political upheavals in America and France, the industrial revolution, and the explosion in humanity's knowledge of the natural order all had a profound effect on Coleridge and radical intellectuals like him. This book examines Coleridge's ideas on science and society in the critical years 1794 to 1796, setting them within the moral, political, and scientific context of the time. Wylie shows how the complex (...)
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  31. Introduction: Feminist Legacies / Feminist Futures: 25th Anniversary Special Issue.Lori Gruen & Alison Wylie - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):725-732.
    This special issue marks the culmination of Hypatia's twenty-fifth anniversary year. We kicked off the celebration of Hypatia's quarter century as an autonomous journal with a conference, "Feminist Legacies/Feminist Futures," which drew close to 150 attendees—a capacity crowd, and more than twice what we'd expected in the planning stages! The conference provided an opportunity to reflect on how Hypatia came to be and how it has shaped feminist philosophy.
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  32.  1
    Trust in Technicians in Paleontology Laboratories.Caitlin Donahue Wylie - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (2):324-348.
    New technologies can upset scientific workplaces’ established practices and social order. Scientists may therefore prefer preserving skilled manual work and the social status quo to revolutionary technological change. For example, digital imaging of rock-encased fossils is a valuable way for scientists to “see” a specimen without traditional rock removal. However, interviews in vertebrate paleontology laboratories reveal workers’ skepticism toward computed tomography imaging. Scientists criticize replacing physical fossils with digital images because, they say, images are more subjective than the “real thing.” (...)
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  33. Discourse, Practice, Context: From HPS to Interdisciplinary Science Studies.Alison Wylie - 1994 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:393 - 395.
    One of the most widely debated and influential implications of the "demise" of positivism was the realization, now a commonplace, that philosophy of science must be firmly grounded in an understanding of the history of science, and/or of contemporary scientific practice. While the nature of this alliance is still a matter of uneasy negotiation, the principle that philosophical analysis must engage "real" science has transformed philosophical practice in innumerable ways. This short paper is the introduction to a symposium presented at (...)
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  34. Unification and Convergence in Archaeological Explanation: The Agricultural “Wave-of-Advance” and the Origins of Indo-European Languages.Alison Wylie - 1996 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (S1):1-30.
    Given the diversity of explanatory practices that is typical of the sciences a healthy pluralism would seem to be desirable where theories of explanation are concerned. Nevertheless, I argue that explanations are only unifying in Kitcher's unificationist sense if they are backed by the kind of understanding of underlying mechanisms, dispositions, constitutions, and dependencies that is central to a causalist account of explanation. This case can be made through analysis of Kitcher's account of the conditions under which apparent improvements in (...)
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  35.  1
    ‘Reflexivities of discomfort’: Researching the sex trade and sex trafficking in Ireland.Gillian Wylie & Eilís Ward - 2014 - European Journal of Women's Studies 21 (3):251-263.
    This article theorizes a research process in a highly politicized environment in which we, as feminist researchers, found ourselves standing outside the feminist standpoint which dominated Irish public discourse, viz advocacy of a Swedish-style, neo-abolitionist, prostitution policy. We suggest that our increasing personal and intellectual discomfort as that policy position gained support contained valuable epistemic insight. We theorize this principally by drawing on Pillow’s concept of ‘reflexivities of discomfort’. This article offers an account of the messy dynamics of a research (...)
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  36.  26
    Legacy Data, Radiocarbon Dating, and Robustness Reasoning.Alison Wylie - manuscript
    *PSA 2016, symposium on “Data in Time: Epistemology of Historical Data” organized by Sabina Leonelli, 5 November 2016* *See published version: "Radiocarbon Dating in Archaeology: Triangulation and Traceability" in Data Journeys in the Sciences (2020) - link below* Archaeologists put a premium on pressing “legacy data” into service, given the notoriously selective and destructive nature of their practices of data capture. Legacy data consist of material and records that been assembled over decades, sometimes centuries, often by means and for purposes (...)
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  37. From the Ground Up: Philosophy and Archaeology, 2017 Dewey Lecture.Alison Wylie - 2017 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 91:118-136.
    I’m often asked why, as a philosopher of science, I study archaeology. Philosophy is so abstract and intellectual, and archaeology is such an earth-bound, data-driven enterprise, what could the connection possibly be? This puzzlement takes a number of different forms. In one memorable exchange in the late 1970s when I was visiting Oxford as a graduate student an elderly don, having inquired politely about my research interests, tartly observed that archaeology isn’t a science, so I couldn’t possibly be writing a (...)
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  38. Collaborations in Indigenous and Community-Based Archaeology: Preserving the Past Together.Alison Wylie, Sara L. Gonzalez, Yoli Ngandali, Samantha Lagos, Hollis K. Miller, Ben Fitzhugh, Sven Haakanson & Peter Lape - 2020 - Association for Washington Archaeology 19:15-33.
    This paper examines the outcomes of Preserving the Past Together, a workshop series designed to build the capacity of local heritage managers to engage in collaborative and community-based approaches to archaeology and historic preservation. Over the past two decades practitioners of these approaches have demonstrated the interpretive, methodological, and ethical value of integrating Indigenous perspectives and methods into the process and practice of heritage management and archaeology. Despite these benefits, few professional resources exist to support the development of collaborative relationships (...)
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  39.  4
    Exploitation: From Practice to Theory ed. by Monique Deveaux and Vida Panitch.Gillian Wylie - 2020 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 13 (1):167-170.
    Exploitation is a concept that escapes easy definition. As Ruth Sample writes in her contribution to Exploitation: From Practice to Theory, "There seems to be no clear, publicly recognized principle, that allows us to determine which interactions are exploitative and which are not". As someone who researches in the field of human trafficking, this is a problem I recognize. Exploitation is at the nub of the international definition of human trafficking. The United Nation's anti-trafficking Palermo Protocol outlines trafficking as the (...)
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  40.  11
    Review: Testing Scientific Theories, John Earman (Ed.): Explaining Confirmation Practice. [REVIEW]Alison Wylie - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (2):292 - 303.
    The contributions to Testing Scientific Theories are unified by an interest in responding to criticisms directed by Glymour against existing models of confirmation–-chiefly H-D and Bayesian schemas–-and in assessing and correcting the “bootstrap“ model of confirmation that he proposed as an alternative in Theory and Evidence. As such, they provide a representative sample of objections to Glymour's model and of the wide range of new initiatives in thinking about scientific confirmation that it has influenced. The effect is a sense of (...)
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  41. Standpoint Theory.Alison Wylie - 2015 - In Robert Audi (ed.), Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 1021-1022.
    Standpoint theory is an explicitly political as well as social epistemology. It’s distinctive features are commitment to understand the social locations that shape the epistemic capacities and resources of individuals in structural terms, and a recognition that those who are marginalized within hierarchically structured systems of social differentiation are often epistemically advantaged. In some crucial domains they know more and know better as a contingent function of their situated experience and knowledge. This “inversion thesis” counters the alignment of social with (...)
     
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  42.  22
    Feminist Critiques of Science: The Epistemological and Methodological Literature.Alison Wylie, Kathleen Okruhlik, Leslie Thielen-Wilson & Sandra Morton - 1989 - Women's Studies International Forum 12 (3):379-388.
    Feminist critiques of science are widely dispersed and often quite inaccessible as a body of literature. We describe briefly some of the influences evident in this literature and identify several key themes which are central to current debates. This is the introduction to a bibliography of general critiques of science, described as the “core literature,” and a selection of feminist critiques of biology. Our objective has been to identify those analyses which raise reflexive (epistemological and methodological) questions about the status (...)
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  43.  26
    Bootstrapping in Un-Natural Sciences: Archaeological Theory Testing.Alison Wylie - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:314 - 321.
    Several difficulties have been raised concerning applicability of Glymour's model to developing and "un-natural" sciences, those contexts in which he claims it should be most clearly instantiated. An analysis of testing in such a field, archaeology, indicates that while bootstrapping may be realized in general outline, practice necessarily departs from the ideal in at least three important respects 1) it is not strictly theory contained, 2) the theory-mediated inference from evidence to test hypothesis is not exclusively deductive and, 3) structural (...)
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  44.  21
    Cartesian Views: Papers Presented to Richard A. Watson[REVIEW]Patricia A. Easton - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):320-321.
    Cartesian Views is a fitting tribute to a man of many parts, to use Alison Wylie’s apt description . Richard A. Watson has provoked, evoked, and invoked new directions in Cartesian scholarship—both methodologically and substantively. Watson’s Downfall of Cartesianism and its sequel, The Breakdown of Metaphysics , have become required reading for students of early modern philosophy and are largely responsible for the revival of many “minor” Cartesians, while serving as sourcebook for methodological attention to history and rational reconstruction. (...)
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  45.  28
    Cartesian views: Papers presented to Richard A. Watson.Patricia A. Easton - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 320-321.
    Cartesian Views is a fitting tribute to a man of many parts, to use Alison Wylie’s apt description . Richard A. Watson has provoked, evoked, and invoked new directions in Cartesian scholarship—both methodologically and substantively. Watson’s Downfall of Cartesianism and its sequel, The Breakdown of Metaphysics , have become required reading for students of early modern philosophy and are largely responsible for the revival of many “minor” Cartesians, while serving as sourcebook for methodological attention to history and rational reconstruction. (...)
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  46. How to Make Home Happy. An Essay. By A.S.A.Y.S. A. Y. A. & How - 1887
     
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  47. Maharshi Patañjalikr̥ta Yogasūtra: Maharshi-Vyāsakr̥ta-Yogasūtrabhāshya aura Ācārya Rajanīśa ke vicāroṃ ke āloka meṃ.Jñāna Prakāśa Śāstrī - 2016 - Dillī: Parimala Pablikeśansa.
    Study of Yogasūtra of Patañjali with Yogabhāṣya of Vyāsa and philosophy of Osho on Yoga philosophy.
     
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  48. Existence, Experience, and Ethics: Essays for S.A. Shaida.S. A. Shaida & A. Raghuramaraju (eds.) - 2000 - D.K. Printworld.
    The Essays Study Different Dimensions Of The Modern Autonomous Individual Existence Such As The Pre-Selfconscious Self And The Mind S Insane Aspects. They Discuss Artistic, Especially Aesthetic, Experience, And Ethics And Moral Philosophy.
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  49.  41
    How Well Do Facts Travel?: The Dissemination of Reliable Knowledge.Peter Howlett & Mary S. Morgan (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Travelling facts Mary S. Morgan; Part I. Matters of Fact: 2. Facts and building artefacts: what travels in material objects? Simona Valeriani; 3. A journey through times and cultures? Ancient Greek forms in American 19th century architecture: an archaeological view Lambert Schneider; 4. Manning's N: putting roughness to work Sarah J. Whatmore and Catharina Landström; 5. My facts are better than your facts: spreading good news about global warming Naomi Oreskes; 6. Real problems with fictional (...)
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  50. Une philosophie de la parole: l'Enquête sur la connaissance verbale (Śābdanirṇaya) de Prakāśātman, maître Advaitin du Xe siècle: (édition critique, traduction, commentaire, avec une nouvelle édition du commentaire d'Anandabodha). Prakāśātma - 2020 - Paris: École française d'Extrême-Orient.
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