6 found
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  1.  89
    Making Sense of Whistle-Blowing’s Antecedents: Learning From Research on Identity and Ethics Programs.Abhijeet K. Vadera, Ruth V. Aguilera & Brianna B. Caza - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (4):553-586.
    Despite a significant increase in whistle-blowing practices in work organizations, we know little about what differentiates whistle-blowers from those who observe a wrongdoing but chose not to report it. In this review article, we first highlight the arenas inwhich research on whistle-blowing has produced inconsistent results and those in which the findings have been consistent. Second, we propose that the adoption of an identity approach will help clarify the inconsistent findings and extend prior work on individual-level motives behind whistle-blowing. Third, (...)
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  2.  94
    The Dark Side of Authority: Antecedents, Mechanisms, and Outcomes of Organizational Corruption.Ruth V. Aguilera & Abhijeet K. Vadera - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4):431-449.
    Corruption poisons corporations in America and around the world, and has devastating consequences for the entire social fabric. In this article, we focus on organizational corruption, described as the abuse of authority for personal benefit, and draw on Weber’s three ideal-types of legitimate authority to develop a theoretical model to better understand the antecedents of different types of organizational corruption. Specifically, we examine the types of business misconduct that organizational leaders are likely to engage in, contingent on their legitimate authority, (...)
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  3.  37
    Legislating a Woman’s Seat on the Board: Institutional Factors Driving Gender Quotas for Boards of Directors.Siri Terjesen, Ruth V. Aguilera & Ruth Lorenz - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (2):233-251.
    Ten countries have established quotas for female representation on publicly traded corporate and/or state-owned enterprise boards of directors, ranging from 33 to 50 %, with various sanctions. Fifteen other countries have introduced non-binding gender quotas in their corporate governance codes enforcing a “comply or explain” principle. Countless other countries’ leaders and policy groups are in the process of debating, developing, and approving legislation around gender quotas in boards. Taken together, gender quota legislation significantly impacts the composition of boards of directors (...)
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  4.  14
    The Evolution of Vocabularies and Its Relation to Investigation of White-Collar Crimes: An Institutional Work Perspective.Abhijeet K. Vadera & Ruth V. Aguilera - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (1):21-38.
    White-collar crimes are illegal and unethical actions by agents of an organization. In this paper, we address two related research questions concerning white-collar crime—how did the language of white-collar crime evolve? And how did this language co-evolve with the investigation of white-collar crime? Building on research on institutional work, we find that key institutional actors such as the Presidential Office are likely to use frames and adopt a particular language in order to legitimize institutional practices . Conversely, less powerful actors (...)
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  5. Deborah E. Rupp Cynthia A. Williams.Ruth V. Aguilera - 2010 - In Marshall Schminke (ed.), Managerial Ethics: Managing the Psychology of Morality. Routledge. pp. 69.
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  6.  1
    An Eye for Artificial Intelligence: Insights Into the Governance of Artificial Intelligence and Vision for Future Research.Ruth V. Aguilera & Deepika Chhillar - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (5):1197-1241.
    In this 60th anniversary of Business & Society essay, we seek to make three main contributions at the intersection of governance and artificial intelligence. First, we aim to illuminate some of the deeper social, legal, organizational, and democratic challenges of rising AI adoption and resulting algorithmic power by reviewing AI research through a governance lens. Second, we propose an AI governance framework that aims to better assess AI challenges as well as how different governance modalities can support AI. At the (...)
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