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  1.  57
    The turn to affect: A critique.Ruth Leys - 2011 - Critical Inquiry 37 (3):434-472.
  2.  6
    The ascent of affect: genealogy and critique.Ruth Leys - 2017 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    In recent years, emotions have become a major, vibrant topic of research not merely in the biological and psychological sciences but throughout a wide swath of the humanities and social sciences as well. Yet, surprisingly, there is still no consensus on their basic nature or workings. Ruth Leys’s brilliant, much anticipated history, therefore, is a story of controversy and disagreement. The Ascent of Affect focuses on the post–World War II period, when interest in emotions as an object of study began (...)
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  3.  23
    Mead's Voices: Imitation as Foundation, or, the Struggle against Mimesis.Ruth Leys - 1993 - Critical Inquiry 19 (2):277-307.
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  4.  24
    Traumatic Cures: Shell Shock, Janet, and the Question of Memory.Ruth Leys - 1994 - Critical Inquiry 20 (4):623-662.
  5.  40
    Critical Response II - Affect and Intention: A Reply to William E. Connolly.Ruth Leys - 2011 - Critical Inquiry 37 (4):799-805.
    William Connolly is in error when he remarks that I begin my article with a discussion of scientific accounts that reduce the emotions to a few genetically wired categories and that I suggest that the cultural theorists who are interested in affect are driven in the same reductive direction.
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  6.  47
    IIIFacts and Moods: Reply to My Critics.Ruth Leys - 2012 - Critical Inquiry 38 (4):882-891.
    The purpose of my article, “The Turn to Affect: A Critique,” was to show that the theorists whose work I analyzed are all committed to the mistaken idea that affective processes are responses of the organism that occur independently of cognition or intention.1 My aim was not to emphasize the differences among the authors under consideration—differences that, as I noted in my article, of course do exist—but rather to demonstrate that those theorists share certain erroneous assumptions about the separation presumed (...)
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  7.  19
    Image and Trauma.Ruth Leys - 2006 - Science in Context 19 (1):137-149.
    ArgumentIn 1980, when the diagnosis of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder was introduced into the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, survivor guilt – a symptom long associated with trauma of the Holocaust and other extreme experiences – was included in the list of symptom criteria. But in the revised edition of the manual of 1987, survivor guilt was demoted to the status of merely an “associated feature” of the condition. Now that survivor guilt has disappeared from the (...)
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  8.  3
    A World Without Pretense? Honest and Dishonest Signaling in Social Life.Ruth Leys - 2013 - Philosophy of Education 69:25-42.
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  9. The real Miss Beauchamp: gender and the subject of imitation.Ruth Leys - 1992 - In Judith Butler & Joan Wallach Scott (eds.), Feminists Theorize the Political. Routledge. pp. 167--214.
     
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  10.  15
    Reply to my commentators – Review Symposium on Leys’s The Ascent of Affect.Ruth Leys - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (2):150-159.
  11.  12
    Surveying the Emotions.Ruth Leys - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (2):109-110.
    A commentary on Robert Kagan’s What is Emotion? (2007). The commentary praises the author for the range and breadth of his analysis and for his skepticism concerning the common tendency to equate emotions with brain states. At the same time, I raise questions about the terms in which Kagan attempts to separate out the distinct components of the emotional “cascade.” In particular, I suggest that by treating the appraisal or interpretation of the changes in bodily feelings as a distinct phase (...)
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