11 found
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  1.  70
    Contempt: Derogating Others While Keeping Calm.Agneta Fischer & Roger Giner-Sorolla - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (4):346-357.
    While philosophers have discussed the emotion of contempt from antiquity to the present day, contempt has received less attention in psychological research. We review the defining features of contempt, both as a short-term emotion and as a more long-lasting sentiment. Contempt is similar to anger in that it may occur after social or moral transgressions, but it differs from anger in its appraisals, actions, and emotivational goals. Unlike anger, contempt arises when a person’s or group’s character is appraised as bad (...)
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  2.  96
    Just an anger synonym? Moral context influences predictors of disgust word use.Roberto Gutierrez, Roger Giner-Sorolla & Milica Vasiljevic - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (1):53-64.
    Are verbal reports of disgust in moral situations specific indicators of the concept of disgust, or are they used metaphorically to refer to anger? In this experiment, participants read scenarios describing a violation of a norm either about the use of the body (bodily moral) or about harm and rights (socio-moral). They then expressed disgust and anger on verbal scales, and through facial expression endorsement measures. The use of disgust words in the socio-moral condition was largely predicted by anger words (...)
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  3.  20
    Judging passions: moral emotions in persons and groups.Roger Giner-Sorolla - 2012 - New York: Psychology Press.
    Psychological research shows that our emotions and feelings often guide the moral decisions we make about our own lives and the social groups to which we belong. But should we be concerned that out important moral judgments can be swayed by "hot" passions, such as anger, disgust, guilt, shame and sympathy? Aren't these feelings irrational and counterproductive? Using a functional conflict theory of emotions (FCT), Giner-Sorolla proposes that each emotion serves a number of different functions, sometimes inappropriately, and that moral (...)
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  4.  32
    The past thirty years of emotion research: appraisal and beyond.Roger Giner-Sorolla - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):48-54.
  5.  24
    Emotions in sexual morality: Testing the separate elicitors of anger and disgust.Roger Giner-Sorolla, Jennifer K. Bosson, T. Andrew Caswell & Vanessa E. Hettinger - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (7):1208-1222.
  6.  42
    Perceiving mixed valence emotions reduces intergroup dehumanisation.Francesca Prati & Roger Giner-Sorolla - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (5):1018-1031.
    ABSTRACTTo deny others’ humanity is one of the most heinous forms of intergroup prejudice. Given evidence that perceiving various forms of complexity in outgroup members reduces intergroup prejudice, we investigated across three experiments whether the novel dimension of emotional complexity, or outgroup members’ joint experience of mixed-valence emotions, would also reduce their dehumanisation. Experiment 1 found that perceiving fictitious aliens’ experience of the same primary emotions presented in mixed vs. non-mixed valence pairs led to reduced prejudice via attenuated dehumanisation, i.e. (...)
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  7.  14
    Reply to Dahl (2023): moral content is varied, and premature definitions should not constrain it.Roger Giner-Sorolla, Simon Myers & Joshua Rottman - unknown
    To propose a clear psychological definition of morality is no easy task, and Dahl (2023) is to be commended here for not only doing so, but leaving an explicit paper trail of traits deemed desirable for any such proposal. However, while a rationale for calling phenomena “moral” would be useful, is it really as vital for the conduct of research as Dahl presumes? We instead argue that the definition of the term “morality” is not always a task of scientific definition (...)
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  8.  12
    On cooperative libertines and wicked puritans.Roger Giner-Sorolla & Simon Myers - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e306.
    We agree with Fitouchi et al. that self-denial is sometimes moralized to signal capacity for cooperation, but propose that a person's cooperative character is more precisely judged by willingness to follow cultural, group, and interpersonal goals, for which many rules can serve as proxies, including rules about abstention. But asceticism is not a moral signal if its aims are destructive, while indulging impulses in a culturally approved way can also signal cooperation.
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  9.  24
    Contempt, like any other social affect, can be an emotion as well as a sentiment.Roger Giner-Sorolla & Agneta H. Fischer - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  10.  24
    Three strong moves to improve research and replications alike.Roger Giner-Sorolla, David M. Amodio & Gerben A. van Kleef - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  11.  7
    Social-functional characteristics of Chinese terms translated as “shame” or “guilt”: a cross-referencing approach.Daqing Liu & Roger Giner-Sorolla - 2023 - Cognition and Emotion 37 (3):466-485.
    Previous research has found a rich lexicon of shame and guilt terms in Chinese, but how comparable these terms are to “shame” or “guilt” in English remains a question. We identified eight commonly used Chinese terms translated as “shame” and “guilt”. Study 1 assessed the Chinese terms’ intensities, social characteristics, and action tendencies among 40 Chinese speakers. Testing term production in the reverse direction, Study 2 asked another Chinese-speaking sample (N = 85) to endorse emotion terms in response to eight (...)
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