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Roeland Van Hout [4]Roeland W. N. M. van Hout [1]
  1.  4
    .Karlien Franco, Dirk Geeraerts, Dirk Speelman & Roeland Van Hout - 2019 - 30 (1):205-242.
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  2. Patterns of Semantic Variation Differ Across Body Parts: Evidence From the Japonic Languages.Asifa Majid, Roeland van Hout & John L. A. Huisman - 2021 - Cognitive Linguistics 32 (3):455-486.
    The human body is central to myriad metaphors, so studying the conceptualisation of the body itself is critical if we are to understand its broader use. One essential but understudied issue is whether languages differ in which body parts they single out for naming. This paper takes a multi-method approach to investigate body part nomenclature within a single language family. Using both a naming task and colouring-in task to collect data from six Japonic languages, we found that lexical similarity for (...)
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  3. A Cognitive Account of Subjectivity Put to the Test: Using an Insertion Task to Investigate Mandarin Result Connectives.Wilbert P. M. S. Spooren, Ted J. M. Sanders, Roeland W. N. M. van Hout & Hongling Xiao - 2021 - Cognitive Linguistics 32 (4):671-702.
    This article aims to further test the cognitive claims of the so-called subjectivity account of causal events and their linguistic markers, causal connectives. We took Mandarin Chinese, a language that is typologically completely different from the usual western languages, as a case to provide evidence for this subjectivity account. Complementary to the commonly used corpora analyses, we employed crowdsourcing to tap native speakers’ intuitions about causal coherence, focusing on four result connectives kějiàn ‘therefore’, suǒyǐ ‘so’, yīncǐ ‘so/for this reason’ and (...)
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  4.  9
    Concept Characteristics and Variation in Lexical Diversity in Two Dutch Dialect Areas.Karlien Franco, Dirk Geeraerts, Dirk Speelman & Roeland Van Hout - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (1):205-242.
    Lexical diversity, the amount of lexical variation shown by a particular concept, varies between concepts. For the concept drunk, for instance, nearly 3000 English expressions exist, including blitzed, intoxicated, and hammered. For the concept sober, however, a significantly smaller number of lexical items is available, like sober or abstinent. While earlier variation studies have revealed that meaning-related concept characteristics correlate with the amount of lexical variation, these studies were limited in scope, being restricted to one semantic field and to one (...)
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  5.  4
    Big Data Suggest Strong Constraints of Linguistic Similarity on Adult Language Learning.Job Schepens, Roeland van Hout & T. Florian Jaeger - 2020 - Cognition 194:104056.
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