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  1.  12
    Arendt's Denktagebuch, 1950–1973: An Unwritten Ethics for the Human Condition?Rodrigo Chacón - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (4):561-582.
    Summary This paper provides an interpretation of the movement of Arendt's thought in her Denktagebuch, from 1950 to 1973. This movement results in an incipient political philosophy based on new concepts of freedom, equality, and solidarity. As a contribution to debates on the normative foundations of Arendt's political thought, the paper seeks to show that her incipient political philosophy is based on an ethical understanding of the human condition as constituted by its openness to the divine, the worldly, and the (...)
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  2.  21
    Reading Strauss From the Start.Rodrigo Chacón - 2010 - European Journal of Political Theory 9 (3):287-307.
    It has often been noted that Leo Strauss developed his understanding of political philosophy through a critical engagement with Heidegger. Yet most analyses focus on Strauss’s American works while neglecting his earlier response during the crisis years of the Weimar Republic. The article seeks to overcome this limitation by ‘deconstructing’ Strauss’s American definitions of political philosophy in light of both his Weimar understanding of politische Wissenschaft and his 1922 discovery of Heidegger’s Aristotle. I argue that Strauss’s conception of political philosophy (...)
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    Leo Strauss and the Classics. Burns Brill's Companion to Leo Strauss’ Writings on Classical Political Thought. Pp. XIV + 480. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2015. Cased, €168, Us$218. Isbn: 978-90-04-24335-4. [REVIEW]Rodrigo Chacon - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (1):281-283.
  4.  21
    Strauss and Husserl.Rodrigo Chacón - 2014 - Idealistic Studies 44 (2-3):281-295.
    Among the great philosophers of the twentieth century, only one, perhaps, shared Leo Strauss’s understanding of “ideas” as fundamental problems: his teacher Husserl. Throughout his work, Strauss heeded Husserl’s call to return to the “things themselves” and “the problems connected with them.” I argue that “natural right” is one such phenomenon or problem which Strauss seeks to recover—and reactivate—from centuries of sedimented interpretations. I further propose that “natural right” may be a “sense-formation” analogous to Husserl’s “geometry.” If this is true, (...)
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